CNC machines or all by hand. Which is best? What is the cues value?

middleofnowhere

Registered
Bert schrager and Tim Pagget was all panto


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Bert had a guy named named Stu who was a genius with a pantograph. Pantographs can be retrofitted to CNC. I have a Gorton P 1-2 and I was told I can make it CNC for about ,$2500.00 by Bludworth.
 
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JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
Burt had a guy named named Stu who was a genius with a pantograph. Pantographs can be retrofitted to CNC. I have a Gorton P 1-2 and I was told I can make it CNC for about ,$2500.00 by Bludworth.
Probably not a good investment even if it was true. Which if Leonard told you so is doubtful.
 

MJB

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you’re really talking “hand made”, doesn’t that mean you’re whittling down the butt and shaft by hand with your pocket knife? So “hand made” isn’t really hand made to begin with…
 

middleofnowhere

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Probably not a good investment even if it was true. Which if Leonard told you so is doubtful.
Wasn't even a consideration. I think at one time he was building machines. I have a pretty good set up for indexing and can do some intricate work. Truth is though, I haven't had any interest in years.
 

ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
There is considerable difference between CNC or Pantograph and a true artist or craftsman that can carve something out by hand. I can train a helper to start cranking out dozens or thousands of identical pieces on a machine in half a day or less. Teaching someone to cut the same things with hand tools might be difficult or impossible regardless of how long I spent with them. With a computer I can or could do magic. Drawings of extreme complexity. When it comes to doing things by hand I am a pretty fair technician and craftsman, a pretty lousy artist.

There is little difference in a NC machine and a printer. I admire the people that can whip out that old three blade knife or a bent and sharpened piece of an old hacksaw blade and make magic! Some can that use NC machines to save time, some can't. While there can be artistry in the design, once created as an NC file countless copies can be cranked out.

There is a traditional wood turning site called World of Wood I believe. Some of the turnings/carvings show very high levels of artistry, far beyond 99.9% of pool cues. I would like to see genuine artistry brought to pool cues. The door is wide open for someone that wants to step in.

Hu
 

str8eight

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There is considerable difference between CNC or Pantograph and a true artist or craftsman that can carve something out by hand. I can train a helper to start cranking out dozens or thousands of identical pieces on a machine in half a day or less. Teaching someone to cut the same things with hand tools might be difficult or impossible regardless of how long I spent with them. With a computer I can or could do magic. Drawings of extreme complexity. When it comes to doing things by hand I am a pretty fair technician and craftsman, a pretty lousy artist.

There is little difference in a NC machine and a printer. I admire the people that can whip out that old three blade knife or a bent and sharpened piece of an old hacksaw blade and make magic! Some can that use NC machines to save time, some can't. While there can be artistry in the design, once created as an NC file countless copies can be cranked out.

There is a traditional wood turning site called World of Wood I believe. Some of the turnings/carvings show very high levels of artistry, far beyond 99.9% of pool cues. I would like to see genuine artistry brought to pool cues. The door is wide open for someone that wants to step in.

Hu

What website are you referring to? Can't find world of wood.


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ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
What website are you referring to? Can't find world of wood.


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this is the site. You don't see a whole lot without being a member but there is a few things to view and a few for sale. Now I am trying to remember the name of the national association, they have lots of eye candy including slide shows of over a hundred pieces last I knew.

Anyway, here is the link to world of wood turners. If you decide you want to join I can send you an invite if I remember how, any member can.
 

Canadian cue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It isnt the technology that determines the value it is how you use it. If you invest a bunch of time into designing a cue and use the latest technology to execute it, that shouldn't lesson its value. Now if you use cnc as a means to pump out a thousand of that same design then those cues will certainly have less value.
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
It isnt the technology that determines the value it is how you use it. If you invest a bunch of time into designing a cue and use the latest technology to execute it, that shouldn't lesson its value. Now if you use cnc as a means to pump out a thousand of that same design then those cues will certainly have less value.
I think one of a kind can be important in value. I had a cue made by at the time the most preeminent cue maker. It was an original design drawn up by me. He did not disappoint, it was magnificent.

He later made copies of my cue.
 

Ron Padilla

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Burt had a guy named named Stu who was a genius with a pantograph. Pantographs can be retrofitted to CNC. I have a Gorton P 1-2 and I was told I can make it CNC for about ,$2500.00 by Bludworth.

When Tim worked with Bert it was
All done brain, eyes, and hands, no cnc at that time, and Tim went on to make cues the same way!


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middleofnowhere

Registered
When Tim worked with Bert it was
All done brain, eyes, and hands, no cnc at that time, and Tim went on to make cues the same way!


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When I was at Berts shop there was no CNC. Don't know if there was later. Inlay work was done with a pantograph.
 
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