DC motor recomendation

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
Looking for recommendations for a small DC motor to use as a turning motor with the headstock from my other post, to be used for my CNC mill to turn shafts. I have 90 vdc and 12 vdc speed controllers. What do you guys use? Not looking to spend the farm, as it will just be turning shafts so no heavy torque required. Space is tight on the footprint of the table.
Thanks,
Dave
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
Has anyone used a stepper motor for continuous rotation? If so, what type of controls / software settings are needed? I have the Gecko G540 controller with a fourth axis, what else is needed?
Thanks,
Dave
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i’ve recommended the 3/4 hp consew motors an controller in the past. Haven’t bought one recently so don’t know if still in the $99 range. Solid torque. I prefer the version with integral vfd vs the brush version DC but have both. Either is plug n play in 115 outlet. However either version is set by dial, not footpedal. (IOW lever switch provided to hook to industrial sewing machine pedal is only on or off, not variable at least in my older versions. Variable can first be adjusted with a dial.

good luck whatever the choice. It’s always informative how you share the results.

smt.
 

Scratchy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dave, yes, people have, and I do, use steppers in continuous rotation. You set the output not as ‘A’ axis, but spindle. Damn poor with names, but the ‘OB Cues’ guy, VERY strong in motor applications, addressed it a couple years ago.

Can provide more detailed explanation if needed.

Mac


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BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Has anyone used a stepper motor for continuous rotation? If so, what type of controls / software settings are needed? I have the Gecko G540 controller with a fourth axis, what else is needed?
Thanks,
Dave
I have and I do. Mach 3... I just swapped out the spindle pins for the A pins (I believe). Been a long time ago I messed with it. But it worked and still works. I do remember this......It wouldn't change over after I went into the settings and changed the pinouts for some reason until after I closed out of Mach and rebooted it. Thanks to that advice from another azb member ;)
Not a high torque or super high speed turning situation but for shafts and/or butts it works fine and is very programmable for our needs.
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Dave, yes, people have, and I do, use steppers in continuous rotation. You set the output not as ‘A’ axis, but spindle. Damn poor with names, but the ‘OB Cues’ guy, VERY strong in motor applications, addressed it a couple years ago.

Can provide more detailed explanation if needed.

Mac


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If you are talking about Royce, yes, he was one of the best people that ever signed into this forum. Unfortunate and very sad that he is no longer with us.
 

Scratchy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yes, thanks, Dave. Royce, and indeed one of classiest and for sure smartest guys around. We miss a lot from his passing


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Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
OKay, looks like I will be going with a stepper motor with a separate stepper controller and a stepper motor drive. I figured it would be better to do a standalone setup so I don't risk my G540 if I messup the wiring, etc. Looking forward to getting this up and running soon.
 

dafunkdawg

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
For a quick cheap and easy way to manually controll a stepper you can use one of these
You will need to run it into a stepper driver but essentially it generates a step pulse that increases speed when the knob is turned and a push button to reverse it. I have used a stepper on my taper machine since I built it with good results. I run it at a little over 300 rpm max before it loses too much torque to be useful. You could probably get a motor with a slightly better torqure curve but I just used a nema 23 that I had extra
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
OKay, looks like I will be going with a stepper motor with a separate stepper controller and a stepper motor drive. I figured it would be better to do a standalone setup so I don't risk my G540 if I messup the wiring, etc. Looking forward to getting this up and running soon.
If you already have a 4 axis box you don't need a seperate controller. Just wire a new stepper up and bingo. Everything else is done in the software.
You running Mach?
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
OKay, looks like I will be going with a stepper motor with a separate stepper controller and a stepper motor drive. I figured it would be better to do a standalone setup so I don't risk my G540 if I messup the wiring, etc. Looking forward to getting this up and running soon.
Both of my cnc machines I built use a nema 23 stepper for the spindle and both are wired directly from my 540 boards on the A axis. You need nothing more, don't overcomplicate it. There is no more risk running the spindle than any of the other axis.

Wire up the 4 wires to the stepper as per diagram and plug it into the A axis plug. Then configure it in Mach.

You will then control every aspect of your spindle motor with your mouse. Really can't be beat. It gives you the ability to run a cut and walk away and having everything shut off when complete.
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What is consew motor?
Industrial sewing machines orginally are high speed clutch motor because most sewing rooms are still piecerate sweatshops. The moto runs constantly and the operator manipulates the clutch. Its amazing to watch, good ones can feather the clutch but mostly the machine is either stopped....or full tilt boogie. Can’t make money with it idling.

A number of years ago the Consew brand (& now Juki & others) machines became more widely used outside the original factory market for heavy duty home & craftwork and some one “over there” saw a market to provide non-clutch replacement motors with variable speed for the home shop and less intense craft markets. Less intimidating for occasional users. It does look like prices have gone up some from a few years ago.


They are not really 3/4 hp but the 550w & larger versions provide enough oomph for cue lathes & such. I use one on the taper and turning set up on my planer with a router is mounted in the tool slide.

All that said, a stepper gives some really nice options that aren’t going to be available on a regular dc motor.

smt
 
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Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
For a quick cheap and easy way to manually controll a stepper you can use one of these
You will need to run it into a stepper driver but essentially it generates a step pulse that increases speed when the knob is turned and a push button to reverse it. I have used a stepper on my taper machine since I built it with good results. I run it at a little over 300 rpm max before it loses too much torque to be useful. You could probably get a motor with a slightly better torqure curve but I just used a nema 23 that I had extra
This is what I will be doing....
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
If you already have a 4 axis box you don't need a seperate controller. Just wire a new stepper up and bingo. Everything else is done in the software.
You running Mach?
Yes I am running Mach, but where my control box is, I would have to move a bunch of stuff, and open the box etc then run some wiring...etc. Using an $18 separate controller and power supply(that I already have) will be easier to set up and locate, I am tight on space right now. Eventually I will move it to the G540, and then I will use the extra controller for another project I am cooking up.
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Yes I am running Mach, but where my control box is, I would have to move a bunch of stuff, and open the box etc then run some wiring...etc. Using an $18 separate controller and power supply(that I already have) will be easier to set up and locate, I am tight on space right now. Eventually I will move it to the G540, and then I will use the extra controller for another project I am cooking up.
I understand tight spaces. You should get your 540 box out of there now and allow some air to circulate around it or you may end up deeper in a hole than just running in tight spaces. A wire doesn't take up much space.
 
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BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Both of my cnc machines I built use a nema 23 stepper for the spindle and both are wired directly from my 540 boards on the A axis. You need nothing more, don't overcomplicate it. There is no more risk running the spindle than any of the other axis.

Wire up the 4 wires to the stepper as per diagram and plug it into the A axis plug. Then configure it in Mach.

You will then control every aspect of your spindle motor with your mouse. Really can't be beat. It gives you the ability to run a cut and walk away and having everything shut off when complete.
That makes too much sense JC. You need to do things in a more complicated way. o_O
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
Wire up the 4 wires to the stepper as per diagram and plug it into the A axis plug. Then configure it in Mach.
.
What if you have a 6 wire motor? I have 3 extra motors, all are 6 wire
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
What if you have a 6 wire motor? I have 3 extra motors, all are 6 wire


In that case I would figure out how to use it. Remember when we had to go to the library to find answers? Man it's nice to be alive today!
 

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