Dennis Orcullo banned from USA for five years

sixpack

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There should be quotes around "Kiss my ass, son" and a dash or colon after it, since he is using an example quote as a subject for study
Seems like there *should* be a colon in there somewhere...
 
Last edited:

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my hero's
Silver Member
Well then, call them up and set up a game for me. I could use some easy action from bad sticks.


Jeff Livingston


I am sure the Clinton’s don’t gamble on Pool, they do drain suckers money to their Foundation.

I have looked at the Clinton Foundation Web-site, all I know is they say they do good.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
I am sure the Clinton’s don’t gamble on Pool, they do drain suckers money to their Foundation.

I have looked at the Clinton Foundation Web-site, all I know is they say they do good.
It's not that hard to understand. Politicians are criminals. If you think it's only the Clinton Foundation robbing fools (or using tax loopholes to save their friends tax money), you need to research how politicians work. I'd be surprised if 20% of all US politicians at national level were not criminals. Once you have enough resources, the law is no longer a concern.
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
Unfortunately this is all true. Dennis was supposed to come to my home last night, after his plane arrived at 6 PM. I waited and waited and at about 10 PM I began to get worried. He has come here dozens of times and never had a problem before. My first thoughts were dire ones and I checked with Philippine Air and his flight did arrive on schedule. So I knew something happened after he got to Los Angeles. There were only two real possibilities; trouble entering the country or something far worse like a robbery during his taxi ride to get here. That kind of thing has happened more than once in the last year, where a rogue cab driver, along with an accomplice rob an unsuspecting passenger. Knowing Dennis and that he would put up a fight, I became very worried, so I called the police. The local sheriff station sent someone to my home, now well after Midnight. He took all my information and information about Dennis, but told me that since he was not a U.S. citizen there wasn't anything he could do. He gave me the direct phone number for Customs and Immigration and suggested I go to the airport early in the morning. I tried calling the number but just got a service saying they are closed now (It was Sunday night).

I tried to get some rest but was antsy to find out what happened to my friend. After a few hours of restless sleep I woke my wife and told her we were going to the airport. We got to LAX at 5 AM and it was like a morgue, with nothing opened and only a few people sleeping in chairs and on the floor, their luggage piled around them. The Customs office was closed and so was the airport police station. Lenie and I walked everywhere in the International terminal and I explored all the back hallways to see what I could find. There was virtually no security presence at that time of day, only TSA checkpoints that led to the boarding areas. I tried but was unable to bypass them. There was no place to get any food and almost all the restrooms were closed (we did find one). People were beginning to stream in at about 6 AM, as the first flights were going out at 7 AM. I stopped a Customs officer who was entering the terminal and asked him when their office opened. He said between 6 and 7 AM.

About 6:15 Philippine Air opened their counter and I inquired about Dennis there. I found out that he did make his flight and arrived in Los Angeles. The guy was close mouthed about what happened after that and he told me he couldn't discuss it. We now waited outside the Customs office for them to open. That's when we got the message from Dennis' wife that he had been allowed to send a text message to his family who were justifiably concerned about him (I had contacted them much earlier in the night to make sure he had made his flight and told them he never got to my house). Dennis had just texted them that he had been banned from entering the U.S. for five years and they were sending him back home today.

Soon after that the Customs office opened and I was the first one in line. I inquired about Dennis and asked them if he was there. The guy pointed to a sign that said in bold letters that all information was bound by PRIVACY, meaning he couldn't tell me anything. I'm not easily discouraged and told him I understand. I then told him who Dennis was and he listened, which was good. I knew he had overstayed his visa before, and I asked him what the penalty was. He then told me a five year ban and if it happened again he would be blacklisted for life! I knew then he was well aware of who I was talking about. I'm sure everybody had seen his pool gear by now and knew who he was. I then asked where they would hold someone and he pointed to the back of the terminal and said back there they have rooms (cells) where they hold people if necessary. I didn't bother to ask him if I could see Dennis or talk to him. I knew that was out of the question.

I told Lenie we could go home now. We had been there for hours and there was nothing else we could do. I was somehow relieved that Dennis was being held at Customs and would be going home. The other scenario that played in my head was much more troubling. We will try to find Dennis a good immigration attorney but I'm not optimistic. This is not like being arrested where you are innocent until proven guilty. There is no court here. Decisions by the Immigration department are final!
 
Last edited:

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Unfortunately this is all true. Dennis was supposed to come to my home last night, after his plane arrived at 6 PM. I waited and waited and at about 10 PM I began to get worried. He has come here dozens of times and never had a problem before. My first thoughts were dire ones and I checked with Philippine Air and his flight did arrive on schedule. So I knew something happened after he got to Los Angeles. There were only two real possibilities; trouble entering the country or something far worse like a robbery during his taxi ride to get here. That kind of thing has happened more than once in the last year, where a rogue cab driver, along with an accomplice rob an unsuspecting passenger. Knowing Dennis and that he would put up a fight, I became very worried, so I called the police. The local sheriff station sent someone to my home, now well after Midnight. He took all my information and information about Dennis, but told me that since he was not a U.S. citizen there wasn't anything he could do. He gave me the direct phone number for Customs and Immigration and suggested I go to the airport early in the morning. I tried calling the number but just got a service saying they are closed now (It was Sunday night).

I tried to get some rest but was antsy to find out what happened to my friend. After a few hours of restless sleep I woke my wife and told her we were going to the airport. We got to LAX at 5 AM and it was like a morgue, with nothing opened and only a few people sleeping in chairs and on the floor, their luggage piled around them. The Customs office was closed and so was the airport police station. Lenie and I walked everywhere in the International terminal and I explored all the back hallways to see what I could find. There was virtually no security presence at that time of day, only TSA checkpoints that led to the boarding areas. I tried but was unable to bypass them. There was no place to get any food and almost all the restrooms were closed (we did find one). People were beginning to stream in at about 6 AM, as the first flights were going out at 7 AM. I stopped a Customs officer who was entering the terminal and asked him when their office opened. He said between 6 and 7 AM.

About 6:15 Philippine Air opened their counter and I inquired about Dennis there. I found out that he did make his flight and arrived in Los Angeles. The guy was close mouthed about what happened after that and he told me he couldn't discuss it. We now waited outside the Customs office for them to open. That's when we got the message from Dennis' wife that he had been allowed to send a text message to his family who were justifiably concerned about him (I had contacted them much earlier in the night to make sure he had made his flight and told them he never got to my house). Dennis had just texted them that he had been banned from entering the U.S. for five years and they were sending him back home today.

Soon after that the Customs office opened and I was the first one in line. I inquired abouit Dennis and asked them if he was there. The guy pointed to a sign that said in bold letters that all information was bound by PRIVACY, meaning he couldn't tell me anything. I'm not easily discouraged and told him I understand. I then told him who Dennis was and he listened, which was good. I knew he had overstayed his visa and asked him what the penalty was. He then told me a five year ban and if it happened again he would be blacklisted for life! I knew then he was well aware of who I was talking about. I'm sure everybody had seen his pool gear by now and knew who he was. I then asked where they would hold someone and he pointed to the back of the terminal and said back there they have rooms (cells) where they hold people if necessary. I didn't bother to ask him if I could see Dennis or talk to him. I knew that was out of the question.

I told Lenie we would go home now. We had been there for hours and there was nothing else we could do. I was somehow relieved that Dennis was being held at Customs and would be going home. The other scenario that played in my head was much more troubling. We will try to find Dennis a good immigration attorney but I'm not optimistic. This is not like being arrested where you are innocent until found guilty. There is no court here. Decisions by the Immigration department are final!
Little confused here. They got him for overstaying on his way 'into' the US? Had he overstayed before he left and then on his way back got nabbed? Sounds weird.
 
Last edited:

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
Little confused here. They got him for overstaying on his way in to the US? Had he overstayed before he left and then on his way back got nabbed? Sounds weird.
Correct. They have no problem letting you leave the country if you overstay your visa. There is usually a fine assessed before allowing you to either leave here or to re-enter the Philippines. It could be as much as $100 up to $500 for every day you overstayed. This may have been Dennis' second infraction. They then notate that on your passport information (we live in the computer age) and when that comes up the next time you try to enter the USA you get red flagged and told to wait over there. That's when you get the bad news, maybe after they've been holding you for a period of time. They will tell you then exactly what's going to happen and there is no appeal.

One last thing. When Immigration grabs you, you pretty much lose all your rights; to an attorney, to make a phone call, and you can be held for an unlimited amount of time! That goes for both a foreign citizen or a U.S. citizen!
 
Last edited:

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
it might be just the start of his troubles as another agency may investigate him and find he owes lots of money. or not.
 

phreaticus

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Little confused here. They got him for overstaying on his way in to the US? Had he overstayed before he left and then on his way back got nabbed? Sounds weird.
Actually, it makes perfect sense. If he overstayed on his last trip, it wouldn’t be noticed until arriving back into USA on his next trip. There is no passport control or checking of visa status by US authorities upon departure from US and PI authorities don’t check upon on re-entry back into the PI. Usually airlines staff on the departure side will unofficially confirm passenger has a valid passport/visa status before boarding flight, which would have occured upon checking in to his last depart flight out of PI to here - but if he had a valid multi-entry visa the visa page itself would have appeared fine. The only indication of overstay is by checking the individual dates on each entry/exit stamp on the passport pages, which is exactly what happens to visa/greencard holders during passport control process upon entry to US.

Wish him well. Immigration attorney may be able to help, but at best the appeal process is likely to be long & painful, as nothing in INS world moves fast.

I’ve been traveling the globe my entire life, heavily in Asia for 25+ years. Situations like this are super stressful for all involved. Jay - Dennis & family are lucky to have caring friends like you & Lenie to check & help them out on this side. Get some rest, let me know if I can help in any way.

Best
 
Last edited:

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Correct. They have no problem letting you leave the country if you overstay your visa. There is usually a fine assessed before allowing you to leave. It could be as much as $500 for every day you overstayed. They then notate that on your passport information (we live in the computer age) and when that comes up the next time you try to enter the USA you get red flagged and told to wait over there. That's when you get the bad news, maybe after they've been holding you for a period of time. They will tell you then exactly what's going to happen and there is no appeal.

One last thing. When Immigration grabs you, you pretty much lose all your rights; to an attorney, to make a phone call, and you can be held for an unlimited amount of time! That goes for both a foreign citizen or a U.S. citizen!
Pretty sure immigrants/foreign nationals can have an attorney but you're not provided one. Have to hire them.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Unfortunately this is all true. Dennis was supposed to come to my home last night, after his plane arrived at 6 PM. I waited and waited and at about 10 PM I began to get worried. He has come here dozens of times and never had a problem before. My first thoughts were dire ones and I checked with Philippine Air and his flight did arrive on schedule. So I knew something happened after he got to Los Angeles. There were only two real possibilities; trouble entering the country or something far worse like a robbery during his taxi ride to get here. That kind of thing has happened more than once in the last year, where a rogue cab driver, along with an accomplice rob an unsuspecting passenger. Knowing Dennis and that he would put up a fight, I became very worried, so I called the police. The local sheriff station sent someone to my home, now well after Midnight. He took all my information and information about Dennis, but told me that since he was not a U.S. citizen there wasn't anything he could do. He gave me the direct phone number for Customs and Immigration and suggested I go to the airport early in the morning. I tried calling the number but just got a service saying they are closed now (It was Sunday night).

I tried to get some rest but was antsy to find out what happened to my friend. After a few hours of restless sleep I woke my wife and told her we were going to the airport. We got to LAX at 5 AM and it was like a morgue, with nothing opened and only a few people sleeping in chairs and on the floor, their luggage piled around them. The Customs office was closed and so was the airport police station. Lenie and I walked everywhere in the International terminal and I explored all the back hallways to see what I could find. There was virtually no security presence at that time of day, only TSA checkpoints that led to the boarding areas. I tried but was unable to bypass them. There was no place to get any food and almost all the restrooms were closed (we did find one). People were beginning to stream in at about 6 AM, as the first flights were going out at 7 AM. I stopped a Customs officer who was entering the terminal and asked him when their office opened. He said between 6 and 7 AM.

About 6:15 Philippine Air opened their counter and I inquired about Dennis there. I found out that he did make his flight and arrived in Los Angeles. The guy was close mouthed about what happened after that and he told me he couldn't discuss it. We now waited outside the Customs office for them to open. That's when we got the message from Dennis' wife that he had been allowed to send a text message to his family who were justifiably concerned about him (I had contacted them much earlier in the night to make sure he had made his flight and told them he never got to my house). Dennis had just texted them that he had been banned from entering the U.S. for five years and they were sending him back home today.

Soon after that the Customs office opened and I was the first one in line. I inquired abouit Dennis and asked them if he was there. The guy pointed to a sign that said in bold letters that all information was bound by PRIVACY, meaning he couldn't tell me anything. I'm not easily discouraged and told him I understand. I then told him who Dennis was and he listened, which was good. I knew he had overstayed his visa and asked him what the penalty was. He then told me a five year ban and if it happened again he would be blacklisted for life! I knew then he was well aware of who I was talking about. I'm sure everybody had seen his pool gear by now and knew who he was. I then asked where they would hold someone and he pointed to the back of the terminal and said back there they have rooms (cells) where they hold people if necessary. I didn't bother to ask him if I could see Dennis or talk to him. I knew that was out of the question.

I told Lenie we could go home now. We had been there for hours and there was nothing else we could do. I was somehow relieved that Dennis was being held at Customs and would be going home. The other scenario that played in my head was much more troubling. We will try to find Dennis a good immigration attorney but I'm not optimistic. This is not like being arrested where you are innocent until proven guilty. There is no court here. Decisions by the Immigration department are final!
Thanks for the clarification, Jay. How long did Dennis overstay his visa the last time he was here?
 

Fatboy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
He should play the “I was sick with covid card” that will give him some wiggle room. Works like a charm. And with jays accounting of time is a viable reason he couldn’t depart

“If the glove don’t fit you must acquit” worked for OJ.

Fatboy<——-aspiring lawyer
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my hero's
Silver Member
it might be just the start of his troubles as another agency may investigate him and find he owes lots of money. or not.


Well if Dennis wants sympathy he can look in dictionary to find it.

Dennis might be great Pool
Player, but should get he was GUEST in USA, and subject to our rules and regulations.

Just like someone who is guest in his home country is subject to their laws & regulations.
 

PoolBum

Ace in the side.
Silver Member
Unfortunately this is all true. Dennis was supposed to come to my home last night, after his plane arrived at 6 PM. I waited and waited and at about 10 PM I began to get worried. He has come here dozens of times and never had a problem before. My first thoughts were dire ones and I checked with Philippine Air and his flight did arrive on schedule. So I knew something happened after he got to Los Angeles. There were only two real possibilities; trouble entering the country or something far worse like a robbery during his taxi ride to get here. That kind of thing has happened more than once in the last year, where a rogue cab driver, along with an accomplice rob an unsuspecting passenger. Knowing Dennis and that he would put up a fight, I became very worried, so I called the police. The local sheriff station sent someone to my home, now well after Midnight. He took all my information and information about Dennis, but told me that since he was not a U.S. citizen there wasn't anything he could do. He gave me the direct phone number for Customs and Immigration and suggested I go to the airport early in the morning. I tried calling the number but just got a service saying they are closed now (It was Sunday night).

I tried to get some rest but was antsy to find out what happened to my friend. After a few hours of restless sleep I woke my wife and told her we were going to the airport. We got to LAX at 5 AM and it was like a morgue, with nothing opened and only a few people sleeping in chairs and on the floor, their luggage piled around them. The Customs office was closed and so was the airport police station. Lenie and I walked everywhere in the International terminal and I explored all the back hallways to see what I could find. There was virtually no security presence at that time of day, only TSA checkpoints that led to the boarding areas. I tried but was unable to bypass them. There was no place to get any food and almost all the restrooms were closed (we did find one). People were beginning to stream in at about 6 AM, as the first flights were going out at 7 AM. I stopped a Customs officer who was entering the terminal and asked him when their office opened. He said between 6 and 7 AM.

About 6:15 Philippine Air opened their counter and I inquired about Dennis there. I found out that he did make his flight and arrived in Los Angeles. The guy was close mouthed about what happened after that and he told me he couldn't discuss it. We now waited outside the Customs office for them to open. That's when we got the message from Dennis' wife that he had been allowed to send a text message to his family who were justifiably concerned about him (I had contacted them much earlier in the night to make sure he had made his flight and told them he never got to my house). Dennis had just texted them that he had been banned from entering the U.S. for five years and they were sending him back home today.

Soon after that the Customs office opened and I was the first one in line. I inquired abouit Dennis and asked them if he was there. The guy pointed to a sign that said in bold letters that all information was bound by PRIVACY, meaning he couldn't tell me anything. I'm not easily discouraged and told him I understand. I then told him who Dennis was and he listened, which was good. I knew he had overstayed his visa and asked him what the penalty was. He then told me a five year ban and if it happened again he would be blacklisted for life! I knew then he was well aware of who I was talking about. I'm sure everybody had seen his pool gear by now and knew who he was. I then asked where they would hold someone and he pointed to the back of the terminal and said back there they have rooms (cells) where they hold people if necessary. I didn't bother to ask him if I could see Dennis or talk to him. I knew that was out of the question.

I told Lenie we could go home now. We had been there for hours and there was nothing else we could do. I was somehow relieved that Dennis was being held at Customs and would be going home. The other scenario that played in my head was much more troubling. We will try to find Dennis a good immigration attorney but I'm not optimistic. This is not like being arrested where you are innocent until proven guilty. There is no court here. Decisions by the Immigration department are final!
Thanks for the information Jay. I hope something can be done for Dennis, it would be a shame if he couldn't come back to the U.S. for five years.
 

SBC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
With so many undocumented people from everywhere they decide to pick on someone from The Philippines? Christ they love Americans and we love them.. What a miscarriage of common sense!!
And our government flew in 60,000 unvetted people from Afghanistan in a time of war....where at some level they all hate us....
 

skip100

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Jay's information is a hell of a lot different than the "I heard it on Facebook" speculation that he overstayed his visa by one day. Unfortunately it sounds like far more than a minor infraction.
 
Top