Dimond ball cleaner RPM

slach

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Watch the stripes in both of them home made ball polishers, they spin in a perfect circle, look for the strip spinning with the strip, if it don't change its rotation its because the centrifical force of the spin is keeping all the balls spinning on the same axis, which means the balls are not rotating for a 100% buffing shin, but rather polishing the balls like a yoyo. You don't have to believe me, but if you clearly see one strip not rotating while it's spinning, then none of them are rotating while they're spinning.
Can you also explain why the balls come out very clean and well polished?
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Watch the balls spinning, you can clearly see them rotating while they're spinning!

The biggest issue for me with the Diamond polisher which is why I’m still using my Bludworth spinner after 25 years is certainly not the price, but due to the size and weight of the double platter unit.

We don’t have a good place in our room to keep even a smaller ball polisher permanently, so I’m able to store the bludworth polisher in our storage room and simply bring it out from the storage room weekly, set it on a pool table (with a cover on the table of course), to clean all our sets of pool balls. I simply could not do that with the diamond double platter unit (due to the size and weight of it) nor do we have enough room in our very small storage room to store it.
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Screenshot_20211112-175108__01.jpg

Wheeeeeee!
 

northshoremb

Registered
One of the only downsides I see to the diamond isn't in the design but the replacement parts. Why tge hell would they make replacement carpet that isn't the correct measurements and needs to be cut with an exact blade by the owner?? Literally they have the exact dimensions on hand since they build the unit so the carpet should be precut to exact dimensions. Save Diamond money on material as well as the buyer from having a chance to mess up or cut themselves.
Also why the hell do they tell you to replace the velcro when the purpose to velcro is to aid in speed and replacement?? No need at all to replace velcro if it was contact cemented right at the factory. Just seems like Diamond dropped the ball in those to aspects when it's 2 things that can be fixed so easy. I can see if the replacement pads were from another company set as UNIVERSAL FIT that would cover different size polishers but they are made specific so should 100% be correct size upon manufacturing.


Correct me if I'm wrong.

Sent from my SM-G988W using Tapatalk
 

Shuddy

Diamond Dave’s babysitter
Silver Member
Watch the balls spinning, you can clearly see them rotating while they're spinning!

Yeah, but just remember: “The hardest, things are made harder, than easier things, when they are done by someone, who didn’t do it the first time, someone harder did it the last time.”
 

bradsh98

Bradshaw Billiard Service
Gold Member
Silver Member
Can you also explain why the balls come out very clean and well polished?
I can....
All surfaces of the ball are being contacted. Just because the balls come out clean, it doesn't mean that the design isn't wearing the balls unevenly.

If the ball is spinning only on one axis, it will cause more wear on that axis, causing the balls to become ellipsoidal, vs spherical.

Watch the 2 ball, in this video:

You can see that it never changes its rotational axis.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
One of the only downsides I see to the diamond isn't in the design but the replacement parts. Why tge hell would they make replacement carpet that isn't the correct measurements and needs to be cut with an exact blade by the owner?? Literally they have the exact dimensions on hand since they build the unit so the carpet should be precut to exact dimensions. Save Diamond money on material as well as the buyer from having a chance to mess up or cut themselves.
Also why the hell do they tell you to replace the velcro when the purpose to velcro is to aid in speed and replacement?? No need at all to replace velcro if it was contact cemented right at the factory. Just seems like Diamond dropped the ball in those to aspects when it's 2 things that can be fixed so easy. I can see if the replacement pads were from another company set as UNIVERSAL FIT that would cover different size polishers but they are made specific so should 100% be correct size upon manufacturing.


Correct me if I'm wrong.

Sent from my SM-G988W using Tapatalk
Are you aware that most buyers never replace the carpeting? Secondly, i can't believer someone who can copy this design and build it themselves, would even think about the skills needed to replace the carpeting. I've replaced the carpeting on many of these and never with the Diamond replacement carpeting, because I've got the skills to do so. Let's see what YOU come up with😅
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
The biggest issue for me with the Diamond polisher which is why I’m still using my Bludworth spinner after 25 years is certainly not the price, but due to the size and weight of the double platter unit.

We don’t have a good place in our room to keep even a smaller ball polisher permanently, so I’m able to store the bludworth polisher in our storage room and simply bring it out from the storage room weekly, set it on a pool table (with a cover on the table of course), to clean all our sets of pool balls. I simply could not do that with the diamond double platter unit (due to the size and weight of it) nor do we have enough room in our very small storage room to store it.
I've put caster wheels on the double platter for a lot of owners.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
I can....
All surfaces of the ball are being contacted. Just because the balls come out clean, it doesn't mean that the design isn't wearing the balls unevenly.

If the ball is spinning only on one axis, it will cause more wear on that axis, causing the balls to become ellipsoidal, vs spherical.

Watch the 2 ball, in this video:

You can see that it never changes its rotational axis.
Unless you disturbed the rotation of the balls, the spinning axis is always going to finish up shiner than the 2 spindle sides of the balls.

The faster the balls spin, the more the centrifical force holds the balls to a single pattern rotation.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
Centrifugal force is the inertia force that arises in each rotating object. ... According to Newton's first law, if no force acts on an object, it moves in a straight line. For rotation to occur, a centrifugal force - acting outwards from the center of rotation - must be applied.Jan 4, 2021
 

Hoogaar

Registered
If the ball is spinning only on one axis, it will cause more wear on that axis, causing the balls to become ellipsoidal, vs spherical.
Serious question - how long would this need to happen before you would notice uneven wear on a ball? After a few uses? A couple of decades? Can't imagine it would happen very quickly.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
I'm getting ready to do the same for my single. Or for my back. Or both.

Bit I got a question about the polishers: why don't they fit under the damn diamond table, man?

Thing sat perfectly under the gold crown, so I guess the gold crown is better (!!)?
I have the design for the next generation ball polisher for Diamond that would definitely replace their current models. It'll rotate the balls even more while they're spinning, no more carpeting needed, no sprockets needed either. And the double platter will be about 30% shorter, and both platters will be on the same level
 

fastone371

Certifiable
Silver Member
I can....
All surfaces of the ball are being contacted. Just because the balls come out clean, it doesn't mean that the design isn't wearing the balls unevenly.

If the ball is spinning only on one axis, it will cause more wear on that axis, causing the balls to become ellipsoidal, vs spherical.

Watch the 2 ball, in this video:

You can see that it never changes its rotational axis.
I noticed that the stripped balls spin on one axis only immediately.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
The new ball polisher, if I decide to build it, will actually rotate the balls twice per spin cycle, insuring a 100% surface shine in half the time of the double platter.
 

bradsh98

Bradshaw Billiard Service
Gold Member
Silver Member
Serious question - how long would this need to happen before you would notice uneven wear on a ball? After a few uses? A couple of decades? Can't imagine it would happen very quickly.
It's all dependent on how often you clean the balls, and how much polish is used...

Naturally, to think that the balls will spin on the same axis every time you run them is just unrealistic. That said, it could take years, for the effect to be noticeable.

Something to note: If the design has no implements which cause an axial shift during a cycle, the amount of wear along that axis will increase over time. Once the balls start to become ellipsoidal, they will have a natural tendency to consistently spin about the major axis, thereby accelerating the wear about the major axis.

It may not be noticeable to the naked eye, though it could be measured, and would certainly be noticeable when racking the balls. This would become most obvious in a poolhall setting, with frequent cleanings.
 
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