Fast Improvement Training Method for Shot Making

While trying to improve my shot making on distant thin cuts, I realized that working on aiming doesn’t make sense if my stroke accuracy isn’t up to what’s needed for the shot. One thing led to another and I developed a 3-part system. I propose working on 1 cut angle at a time.

I’ve found a way to shoot the shot ‘without aiming’ in any conventional sense, such that you can tell if you have adequate accuracy at that distance and cut angle. It’s become part 2 of the Method and is called the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. Then proceed to work on honing your aiming method, if any, including sighting until the results approach the percentage you were previously achieving.

Using this method, I’ve learned that my own stoke was not only inaccurate, but had a left-shift offset. And I discovered I had learned unconscious aiming techniques to attempt to compensate for that left offset. Obviously the net result was inconsistent shooting. In only a week’s time, I’ve substantially corrected the left shift and also substantially increased my shot accuracy through learning how I needed to adjust my mechanics for better accuracy.

I improved my shot mechanics through a dry practice approach (part 1 of the FIT Method) that tries to identify one’s worst flaws and make incremental improvements in a few of them at a time. I found that both using the dry practice and looking for the worst problems only, allowed progress, whereas otherwise I was stuck and just flailed around trying stuff randomly and without any sustained progress (sound familiar?). It worked for me when I first identified flaws in my grip and wrist motion and then worked on integrating these changes into my stroke, with feedback from the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. Then when I tried progressing to a setup requiring higher accuracy, I was forced back to the dry practice part in order to figure out the next most important flaw(s) to address.

I’ve now achieved a level of stroke accuracy that I can start working on my aiming method(s). I personally use different aiming methods depending on cut angle and the distance between the cue ball and object ball. But I think there are many viable aiming approaches, including intuition, which is my ultimate goal. I may have more to say about aiming after I have more time with attempting a variety of cut angles and distances, now that I have a stroke that’s up to the task.

Why should you consider this Method before I've even made it to Part 3? First, because there's much value in Parts 1 and 2 that I have done for improving stroke accuracy. I wanted to get that to you without delay.

Secondly, I believe that aiming and aiming methods are personal. What works for one is different from what works for another. If I told you how to refine an aiming method I use (if that's even possible to explain), what's the use of that to you? And I'm not prepared to apply this to 8 aiming methods and give an encyclopedic report. But there's no need. Once you have sufficient accuracy at a given shot, simply apply your aiming method and see if you get good results. Be sure to try it at different distances between CB & OB. If results are not good, try variations. If that doesn't work, try a different method. This is very individual especially because it involves sighting/vision which is unique to each of us.

I invite you to consider this FIT Method for Shot Making and give me your feedback. Setup requires high precision and thus is a bit complicated, requiring equipment, data and training. So, you can’t easily try it now. I think it’s probably best for a pool room pro to use on a dedicated table. I’m hoping to find such, who are interested in learning the Method to deliver it to their students. If interested, you might ask your local pro to learn about it and offer such training at your local pool room.

I have two introductory videos so far in Feb 2024. They are only available on YouTube, so click on the Link to Watch on YouTube
.
The first is an introduction to the Method:


The second video is a show and tell about part 2 of the Method, shooting the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill at various cut angles and distances:

 
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Oikawa

Active member
Can you explain the setup for the FIT method and all the different parts of applying it?

Without them, this thread sounds too much like an advertisement for a product rather than an open discussion. There's lots of ideas, but the most important details behind them aren't explained.
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
While trying to improve my shot making on distant thin cuts, I realized that working on aiming doesn’t make sense if my stroke accuracy isn’t up to what’s needed for the shot. One thing led to another and I developed a 3-part system. I propose working on 1 cut angle at a time.

I’ve found a way to shoot the shot ‘without aiming’ in any conventional sense, such that you can tell if you have adequate accuracy at that distance and cut angle. It’s become part 2 of the Method and is called the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. Then proceed to work on honing your aiming method, if any, including sighting until the results approach the percentage you were previously achieving.

Using this method, I’ve learned that my own stoke was not only inaccurate, but had a left-shift offset. And I discovered I had learned unconscious aiming techniques to attempt to compensate for that left offset. Obviously the net result was inconsistent shooting. In only a week’s time, I’ve substantially corrected the left shift and also substantially increased my shot accuracy through learning how I needed to adjust my mechanics for better accuracy.

I improved my shot mechanics through a dry practice approach (part 1 of the FIT Method) that tries to identify one’s worst flaws and make incremental improvements in a few of them at a time. I found that both using the dry practice and looking for the worst problems only, allowed progress, whereas otherwise I was stuck and just flailed around trying stuff randomly and without any sustained progress (sound familiar?). It worked for me when I first identified flaws in my grip and wrist motion and then worked on integrating these changes into my stroke, with feedback from the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. Then when I tried progressing to a setup requiring higher accuracy, I was forced back to the dry practice part in order to figure out the next most important flaw(s) to address.

I’ve now achieved a level of stroke accuracy that I can start working on my aiming method(s). I personally use different aiming methods depending on cut angle and the distance between the cue ball and object ball. But I think there are many viable aiming approaches, including intuition, which is my ultimate goal. I may have more to say about aiming after I have more time with attempting a variety of cut angles and distances, now that I have a stroke that’s up to the task.

I invite you to consider this FIT Method for Shot Making and give me your feedback. Setup requires high precision and thus is a bit complicated, requiring equipment, data and training. So, you can’t easily try it now. I think it’s probably best for a pool room pro to use on a dedicated table. I’m hoping to find such, who are interested in learning the Method to deliver it to their students. If interested, you might ask your local pro to learn about it and offer such training at your local pool room.

I have two introductory videos so far in Feb 2024. The first is an introduction to the Method:


The second video is a show and tell about part 2 of the Method, shooting the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill at various cut angles and distances:

Please note the videos are not playing on this site, which may be your choice, Ray, but please have a look.
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
Can you explain the setup for the FIT method and all the different parts of applying it?

Without them, this thread sounds too much like an advertisement for a product rather than an open discussion. There's lots of ideas, but the most important details behind them aren't explained.
Ray has other videos that go into details. It's not really an ad IMHO. Ray Balzer is a teacher at heart and his AimRight costs just a few dollars. With it or without it in your toolbox, he has a methodical, logical approach to teaching and learning that will benefit most players.
 
Can you explain the setup for the FIT method and all the different parts of applying it?

Without them, this thread sounds too much like an advertisement for a product rather than an open discussion. There's lots of ideas, but the most important details behind them aren't explained.
It's more than an idea, since I've just demonstrated its effectiveness. I'd like your opinion about what I've presented so far.

Maybe you missed it, but I think I've presented all the important ideas:
Use dry practice in an incremental way to find the worst parts of one's mechanics and a laser for a cue stick worked well for that. Setup a CB out and back drill, but put a ball in the way, such that an accurate stroke will pocket the ball. Increase distance and cut angle as your skill improves. Once sufficient repeatability is achieved at some cut angle and distance, then try your aiming method; experiment until you find a way to approach the results 'without aiming'. Probably a house pro needs to set this up for players on a table set aside for the purpose. If you see merit, ask him to do that.

Note that it's only been maybe a little over 2 weeks since I got the idea. The videos and my text are as much explanation as I've created or thought about. If you watched the intro video, you'll understand that I don't know how to deliver it or explain it any more easily than I've already done. If a picture is work 1000 words, how many words for 2 videos? I think it's something best done in person. To create a way to deliver it effectively to a wide audience remotely seems to me to be to develop it as a product, which I have not done and which is what you say you don't want me to do. Or did I misunderstand you?

Again, my videos show the basic setups and suggest how to apply it. Further, I say that there must be many ways to apply it that WE will invent/create with time. I've just made a first start.
 
Please note the videos are not playing on this site, which may be your choice, Ray, but please have a look.
Matt:

Please educate me. I didn't know there were options. But it seemed best to me to just link to existing videos on youtube, where I've put in chapters, text descriptions, links to related videos, etc. and have a channel (ad free -- non monitized) such that folks can easily find my other videos if they want more of what I've been up to. Further, it makes the most sense to me for there to be ONE place for video management. If I need to replace it with a better version, I have one place to handle it. What're reasons to duplicate the videos here?

And on my computer, it does appear to play here and offers to play in YouTube as well. I don't know how it happens to be able to play here (in YouTube I turn OFF all options for external use, embedding, etc.), nor why it doesn't play for you.
 
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BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
I don't know why it appears this way on my PC in AZ Billiards, but it's unsightly:

Screenshot 2024-02-09 092947.png

I like your work, so I clicked and watched on YouTube, but I'd typically assume the link was old, the video was bad...
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
While trying to improve my shot making on distant thin cuts, I realized that working on aiming doesn’t make sense if my stroke accuracy isn’t up to what’s needed for the shot. One thing led to another and I developed a 3-part system. I propose working on 1 cut angle at a time.

I’ve found a way to shoot the shot ‘without aiming’ in any conventional sense, such that you can tell if you have adequate accuracy at that distance and cut angle. It’s become part 2 of the Method and is called the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. Then proceed to work on honing your aiming method, if any, including sighting until the results approach the percentage you were previously achieving.

Using this method, I’ve learned that my own stoke was not only inaccurate, but had a left-shift offset. And I discovered I had learned unconscious aiming techniques to attempt to compensate for that left offset. Obviously the net result was inconsistent shooting. In only a week’s time, I’ve substantially corrected the left shift and also substantially increased my shot accuracy through learning how I needed to adjust my mechanics for better accuracy.

I improved my shot mechanics through a dry practice approach (part 1 of the FIT Method) that tries to identify one’s worst flaws and make incremental improvements in a few of them at a time. I found that both using the dry practice and looking for the worst problems only, allowed progress, whereas otherwise I was stuck and just flailed around trying stuff randomly and without any sustained progress (sound familiar?). It worked for me when I first identified flaws in my grip and wrist motion and then worked on integrating these changes into my stroke, with feedback from the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. Then when I tried progressing to a setup requiring higher accuracy, I was forced back to the dry practice part in order to figure out the next most important flaw(s) to address.

I’ve now achieved a level of stroke accuracy that I can start working on my aiming method(s). I personally use different aiming methods depending on cut angle and the distance between the cue ball and object ball. But I think there are many viable aiming approaches, including intuition, which is my ultimate goal. I may have more to say about aiming after I have more time with attempting a variety of cut angles and distances, now that I have a stroke that’s up to the task.

I invite you to consider this FIT Method for Shot Making and give me your feedback. Setup requires high precision and thus is a bit complicated, requiring equipment, data and training. So, you can’t easily try it now. I think it’s probably best for a pool room pro to use on a dedicated table. I’m hoping to find such, who are interested in learning the Method to deliver it to their students. If interested, you might ask your local pro to learn about it and offer such training at your local pool room.

I have two introductory videos so far in Feb 2024. The first is an introduction to the Method:


The second video is a show and tell about part 2 of the Method, shooting the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill at various cut angles and distances:

You haven't learned how to aim accurately yet and you are already selling a system for it? Seems like you should master the subject first.
 
You haven't learned how to aim accurately yet and you are already selling a system for it? Seems like you should master the subject first.
Dan: if none of us can offer anything until our play is perfect, what would any of us have to say?

1. I had an insight that has led to remarkable improvement and I'm sharing it. Why should I delay? And I've shared that process at no charge, so I fail to understand your claim I'm selling it.

2. I'm offering a PROCESS that leads to insights and the potential for progress. I only have to understand the PROCESS in order to propose it coherently. And I don't need to know all the possibilities or insights yet to gained. Discovering value (for some) seems sufficient.

3. I noticed a particular weakness in my shot making and looked for a way to separate the elements into their constituent pieces and work on them separately and then see if the problem really is aiming or not. Then use a known shot with known performance as the perfect place to investigate nuances of aiming to consider possible improvements.

Whether I have mastered my aiming or not is irrelevant. There are many aiming methods, as I'm sure you know; plus we change methods over time. How can one systematically evaluate or refine one's method. This is an approach that might help some.
 
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I don't know why it appears this way on my PC in AZ Billiards, but it's unsightly:

View attachment 742350
I like your work, so I clicked and watched on YouTube, but I'd typically assume the link was old, the video was bad...
Oh, I see what you are saying. It looks and plays fine on my computer, but probably because I'm the owner. That video screen is reporting what I already mentioned: that in YouTube, I've disabled the ability for this to play on other websites. This prevents unauthorized uses and allows me to monitor usage and centralize everything at YouTube. I didn't realize this site would attempt to display the video here and post a big black screen. I think this behavior is being done by AZBilliards. The screen is reporting accurately, but it is unsightly as you say. I was just trying to include links to youtube. Right now, I don't see a nice solution that both meets my needs and isn't unsightly and encourages folks that the links are good. I'll think on it.
 
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BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
Oh, I see what you are saying. It looks and plays fine on my computer, but probably because I'm the owner. That video screen is reporting what I already mentioned: that in YouTube, I've disabled the ability for this to play on other websites. This prevents unauthorized uses and allows me to monitor usage and centralize everything at YouTube. I didn't realize this site would attempt to display the video here and post a big black screen. I think this behavior is being done by AZBilliards. The screen is reporting accurately, but it is unsightly as you say. I was just trying to include links to youtube. Right now, I don't see a nice solution that both meets my needs and isn't unsightly and encourages folks that the links are good. I'll think on it.
I can tell you this, if I click here and like what I see, I'm opening/maximizing/viewing on YouTube, and over time, clicks off YouTube into YouTube will increase your viewership, it's a virtuous cycle...
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
You haven't learned how to aim accurately yet and you are already selling a system for it? Seems like you should master the subject first.
Is that the proper question? Isn't the proper question, "Would this product help me improve?" Only some highly skilled teachers are pros, and in each and all stick-and-ball sports.

We can do other questions, too, like asking the inventor, "How much specifically did this product help you? Your students?"
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dan: if none of us can offer anything until our play is perfect, what would any of us have to say?

1. I had an insight that has led to remarkable improvement and I'm sharing it. Why should I delay? And I've shared that process at no charge, so I fail to understand your claim I'm selling it.

2. I'm offering a PROCESS that leads to insights and the potential for progress. I only have to understand the PROCESS in order to propose it coherently. And I don't need to know all the possibilities or insights yet to gained. Discovering value (for some) seems sufficient.

3. I noticed a particular weakness in my shot making and looked for a way to separate the elements into their constituent pieces and work on them separately and then see if the problem really is aiming or not. Then use a known shot with known performance as the perfect place to investigate nuances of aiming to consider possible improvements.

Whether I have mastered my aiming or not is irrelevant. There are many aiming methods, as I'm sure you know; plus we change methods over time. How can one systematically evaluate or refine one's method. This is an approach that might help some.
I initially read your post quickly and got the distinct impression you were selling a three step method while saying you haven't even tried the third step. Now that I spent more time and watched some of your video I see what is going on. You are selling a product (the AimRight card) by coming up with a practice program that makes use of it. Nothing wrong with that. You said you wanted to sell the idea (the method you just came up with, not the AimRight) globally and have every instructor use it. You seem to have commercialized an idea before you have even tried the whole method to see what works and what doesn't. That is VERY odd.

You found some revelations after 40 years of struggling and that must be exhilarating. I know I get excited when I learn something new. However, not every personal breakthrough needs to become a worldwide phenomenon. We all practice and improve in different ways and in ways that hopefully don't take a lifetime to find. I have "invented" numerous tricks and methods that work great for me but that doesn't mean I should make up acronyms for it and essentially monetize it.

Please be aware I'm having a shitty day and am a bit cranky. Good luck with your progress. Report back when you have actually tried the third step of your revolutionary method. ;)
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Is that the proper question? Isn't the proper question, "Would this product help me improve?" Only some highly skilled teachers are pros, and in each and all stick-and-ball sports.

We can do other questions, too, like asking the inventor, "How much specifically did this product help you? Your students?"
We can also ask the inventor if he has actually tried the steps in his own method (please see my latest post).
 
We can also ask the inventor if he has actually tried the steps in his own method (please see my latest post).
Yes, I have. But I don't have anything yet worth publishing.

Besides your dogged opinion that this is all about commercialization, do you have any thoughts about the merits of the approach?

Note: I tell you more about the AimRight because it's mine and I can. I tried to get permission from the laser trainer people to put in a plug for their product and they have not responded to phone or email. That's why you see one and not the other.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yes, I have. But I don't have anything yet worth publishing.

Besides your dogged opinion that this is all about commercialization, do you have any thoughts about the merits of the approach?

Note: I tell you more about the AimRight because it's mine and I can. I tried to get permission from the laser trainer people to put in a plug for their product and they have not responded to phone or email. That's why you see one and not the other.
My criticism isn't just that you're selling a product. Several things kind of irk me:

1. You said in the video that you hadn't yet even tried step 3 aiming. Why not learn about what you are doing before making two videos and coming up with catchy names for everything?
2. I didn't know anything about you initially and you sounded like a kid just learning how to play and were going to show all the instructors this great method that nobody ever thought of.
3. Your videos are way too long and I didn't have 40 minutes to sit through them but I think the gist of what you are recommending is to isolate the variables that could be causing trouble and fix them... not sure why this is revolutionary. It is good to do that and a good instructor can save a lot of time.
4. I think it was Ronnie O'Sullivan who did the "boring" down and back drill for an hour every day. Just sayin'.

Overall I think using new technology like lasers and even VP4 is great for learning. I've even made videos on that. I'm not against your method (in so much as I kind of understand it). I think maybe you are coming on a bit strong that this is something everyone needs, especially when you really don't have it all fleshed out. If it excites you about the game and it isn't snake oil like some other billiard things are then go for it. I'd recommend making a new video after you have it all figured out and be concise. Good luck.
 
My criticism isn't just that you're selling a product. Several things kind of irk me:

1. You said in the video that you hadn't yet even tried step 3 aiming. Why not learn about what you are doing before making two videos and coming up with catchy names for everything?
2. I didn't know anything about you initially and you sounded like a kid just learning how to play and were going to show all the instructors this great method that nobody ever thought of.
3. Your videos are way too long and I didn't have 40 minutes to sit through them but I think the gist of what you are recommending is to isolate the variables that could be causing trouble and fix them... not sure why this is revolutionary. It is good to do that and a good instructor can save a lot of time.
4. I think it was Ronnie O'Sullivan who did the "boring" down and back drill for an hour every day. Just sayin'.

Overall I think using new technology like lasers and even VP4 is great for learning. I've even made videos on that. I'm not against your method (in so much as I kind of understand it). I think maybe you are coming on a bit strong that this is something everyone needs, especially when you really don't have it all fleshed out. If it excites you about the game and it isn't snake oil like some other billiard things are then go for it. I'd recommend making a new video after you have it all figured out and be concise. Good luck.
Thanks for your best wishes.

1. Read my revised first post on this for an answer. As to catchy names; thanks. Names help conversation.

2. Yes, I'm excited like a kid. I think my excitement is appropriate. You'll only know yourself if you seriously try it.

3. I've had instruction (described in the video) and more. Obviously, it didn't work. This works for me. I made the videos for people who want to understand the what and why to seriously consider it and also have some experience of the progress I made. Divide and conquer is certainly one of the principles. So is being fun and being progressive and giving a method to diagnose one's worst flaws in accuracy and in aiming.

4. I could spend an hour each day doing the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. It's revealing and challenging and fun and progressive in a way I don't find with the up and back drill. Part 1 helps find what to change to improve, if stuck, and Part 3 of the FIT Method builds on the setup and progresses to aiming method evaluation & repair.

Being concise: I find it terrific to help with improving shot accuracy and refining Aiming. Highly recommended. Get your local pool instructor to offer it if you need any help in those areas or if you are suffering from a shooting slump and might need a stroke/aiming tuneup.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks for your best wishes.

1. Read my revised first post on this for an answer. As to catchy names; thanks. Names help conversation.

2. Yes, I'm excited like a kid. I think my excitement is appropriate. You'll only know yourself if you seriously try it.

3. I've had instruction (described in the video) and more. Obviously, it didn't work. This works for me. I made the videos for people who want to understand the what and why to seriously consider it and also have some experience of the progress I made. Divide and conquer is certainly one of the principles. So is being fun and being progressive and giving a method to diagnose one's worst flaws in accuracy and in aiming.

4. I could spend an hour each day doing the AimRight Straight-Cut Drill. It's revealing and challenging and fun and progressive in a way I don't find with the up and back drill. Part 1 helps find what to change to improve, if stuck, and Part 3 of the FIT Method builds on the setup and progresses to aiming method evaluation & repair.

Being concise: I find it terrific to help with improving shot accuracy and refining Aiming. Highly recommended. Get your local pool instructor to offer it if you need any help in those areas or if you are suffering from a shooting slump and might need a stroke/aiming tuneup.
Which requires everyone to buy your product. I haven't looked at it. Maybe it is something good.
 
Which requires everyone to buy your product. I haven't looked at it. Maybe it is something good.
'requires': Not true. As I say in my video, it just makes it easier. And I'm suggesting your local pool pro does the setup, not you -- so you don't have to buy any product; just pay your local instructor. Choose what you think is more (cost) effective and decide how long you're willing to wait for your local instructor to get on board. Widespread adoption of new ideas usually takes years.
 
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Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
'requires': Not true. As I say in my video, it just makes it easier. And I'm suggesting your local pool pro does the setup, not you -- so you don't have to buy any product; just pay your local instructor. Choose what you think is more (cost) effective and decide how long you're willing to wait for your local instructor to get on board. Widespread adoption of new ideas usually takes years.
That's the other thing that irked me. You are assuming that what finally clicked for you is a problem for everybody and what you just discovered must be adopted universally. All of us have discovered something about our stroke that made things better and became an "aha" moment. It is great to share those things but to assume that everyone has the same issue and should learn the same way is a bit presumptuous. Also, there are easier ways to achieve what you are doing without the extensive set up, I'm sure.

I'm also nearly 100% sure that nobody really understands what you are doing. I think, maybe, I understand it but your information is not clearly presented. I'm sure if you could tighten it up and be more clear you'd get more engagement.
 
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