Favorite method to keep bridge hand slick

Fay

Member
Whatever happened to the good ole days of burnishing the shaft with a dollar bill? Maybe a $50 if you were high-brow.

I REMEMBER
WHEN I WAS LITTLE
EVERYTIME MY FATHER GOT HOME FROM THE BILLIARD PARLOR
HE WOULD JUST WIPE DOWN HIS SHAFT WITH A CLEAN CLOTH
THEN TAKE A DRINKING GLASS AND ROLL IT ACROSS THE WOOD
IT KEPT IT SO CLEAN AND SMOOTH LIKE SILK

 

RickLafayette

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I have been using the Carpe hand treatment with excellent results. Haven't worn a glove in 9 months (when I started using Carpe).
 

alstl

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Corn starch powder. Put it in a tray and rub it on the top of my hand. Nothing gets on the table or balls.
 

MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In woodworking, 150, 220 is considered fine grit.

What kind of wood working are you talking about?

When working on a tung oil finish I start at 600 and finish at 1500
 

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Jack Justis

CASEMAKER
Silver Member
And I was talking about old Dufferin (one-piece?) house cues that likely have 20 years of oil buildup on them. The sort that will happily fill the grit of 300 in 30 seconds of work. But I may have misunderstood what the OP is dealing with.
No, Bob, You were correct in every instance. 320 grit paper is considered fine and I'll guarantee it is being used by 95% of the cue makers or cue repair shops on shafts new and old if necessary.
 

Ghosst

Broom Handle Mafia
Silver Member
What kind of wood working are you talking about?

When working on a tung oil finish I start at 600 and finish at 1500
150 is indeed, "fine grit".

On a finish coat I'm using 0000 steel wool before the final. But anyways, we're off topic here...

Clamy hands: wet them with isopropyl alcohol and let them air dry. They will be dry for hours.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What kind of wood working are you talking about?

When working on a tung oil finish I start at 600 and finish at 1500
Shiny.
Grades above 400 will do that albeit temporarily. FI if your tung finish has no varnish , it'll go dull again. But you know this. 150-200 is considered fine grit. You can pour poly after 200 and work the dried poly to 10,000 if you like. Don't know if that matters though.

Just to smooth the shaft, I go 400 - 600. For slickness, magic eraser and 91% or stronger isopropyl. I follow with a Turtle Wax product they call Ice. I don't shake the bottle and just use a few drops off the top onto a folded paper towel and directly to the shaft. (If you do that last part in California, you can get cancer.) You can wear a glove if you like.


I WEAR A GLOVE
Lol. Not much else huh?
 

Geosnookery

Well-known member
I rub my cue down with extra fine steel wool once a month or so. Cue as good as new after 14 years.

re Dufferin house cues. They are usually very good quality.
 

9ball5032

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Keep balls and felt clean.
Wash hands before and use towel for sweat or use glove.
Keep shaft clean.
 

MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Shiny.
Grades above 400 will do that albeit temporarily. FI if your tung finish has no varnish , it'll go dull again.
You let the tung oil cure at 600-grit for 5-6 months and then start the last 10 coats, taking out the bumps with 600 and then starting the tung oil sessions. This prevents the shine from leaving over time.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You let the tung oil cure at 600-grit for 5-6 months and then start the last 10 coats, taking out the bumps with 600 and then starting the tung oil sessions. This prevents the shine from leaving over time.
5-6 mo is raw oil right? Or is that boiled or otherwise catalyzed? I've always used Minwax or Danish oil. Can't wait 2 years to appreciate a finish.:D
 

Protractor

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

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Welcome to AZB.

I'll second you on the glove. When I first started playing I could feel friction even if the cue was clean. I used talc, which made a difference, but considered it a band aid. I have used a glove for years now and it works better than any thing else I have tried.
 

Flowerbomb

Member
I don't like when people load up their hands with that white chalk 😑 it ends up all over the table, the felt, and the edges of the table. Then I bend over to shoot and end up with it all over my clothes!
 
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