FOR SERIOUS STUDENTS OF PROFESSIONAL METHODS FOR PLAYING THE GAME

Low500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
For years I noticed that the top Asian players were using extra long bridges most of the time instead of the old fashioned Mosconi method of 6-7-8 inches, etc.,etc.
The short bridges may(?) have been okay in the hey day of straight pool (a half table game), but now against these 9 ball and 10 ball wizards from Asia it is necessary to drive that cue ball around the table while pocketing accurately to remain at the table. And be assured that if the other guy throws a safety on you, most of the time you will be jammed up on a short rail a "mile away" from the object ball.
I began to wonder WHY the Asians seemed to use the long bridge so much?
Some of the answer has been revealed in Stan Shuffett's Master Encyclopedia of Pocket Billiards titled "CENTER POCKET MUSIC".
Stan spends a lot of time discussing bridge lengths as they relate to pivot aiming (which is almost an axiom now with Asian players and they disguise it SO well). They keep it to themselves also...which is a smart thing to do. Especially around most Americans, who by and large, seem to have a built in sense of moral and intellectual superiority toward residents of other countries.
This discussion of bridge lengths in the book should be studied, digested, and then thoroughly worked with at the practice table.
Longer bridges require less pivot, shorter bridges require greater pivots in order to arrive at the NISL (no imagination shot line). This is good news!
Studying these things will give a lot of answers toward some of the WHY concerning the Asians and some Europeans as to how they seem to be beating the daylights out of everyone they play most of the time.
Learning is a fun thing. When you stop learning, your brain atrophies and you die...both figuratively and literally.
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The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
Alex is technically Philippine but grew up in 🇨🇦.

I wouldn't say on average that his bridge is short. In fact I'd say he lingers toward to the long. Probably because he's a short dude.

Long bridges mandate a rock solid stroke. Small deviations on the grip hand are magnified as the bridge becomes longer.
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

FOR SERIOUS STUDENTS OF PROFESSIONAL METHODS FOR PLAYING THE GAME​

This topic heading has some grossly misleading inferences. When ever you create a category, and the topic heading creates two, you create a second category by inference.
When you create a category like “dog”, everything that doesn’t fit in it, is by inference “not dog”.
“Serious Students” is presented as a category here. Logically by inference whatever comes next in the narrative is for serious students. If you choose not to agree then you must be “not serious students”.
“Professional Methods” is a created category here and by implication what comes next belongs there and unless you are not using the presented concept you are using “not professional methods”.
If it stopped there, some might forgive the bias. Then the bias extends to Asian player bridge length methods attributing that to a likely completely unknown source to those players, a recently published book. Chinese 8 ball players require the accuracy of snooker players who have been using bridges up to 14 inches for nearly a century. Finding something you think confirms your thesis is not research. Findings emerge from data, not prove a bias. This is called “confirmation bias”.

Data is like lampposts, there to illuminate, not lean on as confirmation. That’s called cherry picking data to prove your point.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Alex is technically Philippine but grew up in 🇨🇦.

I wouldn't say on average that his bridge is short. In fact I'd say he lingers toward to the long. Probably because he's a short dude.

Long bridges mandate a rock solid stroke. Small deviations on the grip hand are magnified as the bridge becomes longer.
He was already a teenager when he moved to Canada. He still has a Pinoy accent.
Lots of the Pinoy greats have long bridges because the cloth is almost always wet in the Philippines.
Never mind that they have cheaper and slower cloth there . Efren used to have even longer bridge and a bicycle stroke .
He also used 21 oz+ cues . After several years of playing on much improved conditions, he lost the bicycle stroke and now plays with lighter cues .
 

Low500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

FOR SERIOUS STUDENTS OF PROFESSIONAL METHODS FOR PLAYING THE GAME​

This topic heading has some grossly misleading inferences. When ever you create a category, and the topic heading creates two, you create a second category by inference.
When you create a category like “dog”, everything that doesn’t fit in it, is by inference “not dog”.
“Serious Students” is presented as a category here. Logically by inference whatever comes next in the narrative is for serious students. If you choose not to agree then you must be “not serious students”.
“Professional Methods” is a created category here and by implication what comes next belongs there and unless you are not using the presented concept you are using “not professional methods”.
If it stopped there, some might forgive the bias. Then the bias extends to Asian player bridge length methods attributing that to a likely completely unknown source to those players, a recently published book. Chinese 8 ball players require the accuracy of snooker players who have been using bridges up to 14 inches for nearly a century. Finding something you think confirms your thesis is not research. Findings emerge from data, not prove a bias. This is called “confirmation bias”.

Data is like lampposts, there to illuminate, not lean on as confirmation. That’s called cherry picking data to prove your point.
Please do NOT, as you say, "forgive me for my bias toward CTE aiming". I am no more biased than you are in your implication of being "Unbiased".
Everyone is biased to some degree about everything. And everyone "cherry picks" to prove their points. The degree of bias will be in direct proportion to how much someone agrees with or disagrees with the issue being discussed. That is merely human nature and has not changed for 2000 years.
I do not accept or want "forgiveness" from you, or (as our esteemed Vice President says in between her cackles)..."any lectures" from you either. And actually I do not want to even converse with you whatsoever......unless you have something constructive to discuss regarding CTE aiming.
You have 12 hours to shape up or be shipped out to the "Ignore Section" of this forum
You may now depart to lament your fate.
Isn't democracy wonderful?
Signed. sealed, and delivered in his best "Stevie Wonder style"...by "The Low" 500
I feel just capital.JPG
 

The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
And actually I do not want to even converse with you whatsoever......unless you have something constructive to discuss regarding CTE aiming.
What does CTE have to do with a thread directed towards Students of Professional Methods for Playing the Game....?

Infer what you will....
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
. I am no more biased than you are in your implication of being "Unbiased"
So your implication that Stan precipitated Asian and European players to use a long bridge and sneak CTE into their games, is just bias, and not “fake news”?
 

Low500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So your implication that Stan precipitated Asian and European players to use a long bridge and sneak CTE into their games, is just bias, and not “fake news”?
Nowhere did I state that Stan Shuffett precipitated Asian and European players in using a long bridge. You're making that up.
Stan Shuffett has observed those players for years and years. He makes ZERO false news or ZERO false advertising.
His observations of pivot aiming have led him to say, long ago...."what is going on here with these pros?"
Now he discusses bridge distances in his book after years of working with it at the table in pivot aiming, so the pool players of the world would have access to a working tool(his book) to improve their playing.
A half blind man can watch E. Reyes in slow motion and see him pivoting in his aiming.
A half blind man can watch Bustamante in slow motion and see him pivoting in his aiming.
The best thing for you is to NEVER take up any kind of aiming system as a tool to help you. You should continue just as you have for years and continue doing EXACTLY what you've always done and leave people like me alone. As I certainly plan to leave you alone.
Don't bother to "circle back" to me a la Ms. Jen Psaki. You and I are not compatible.
You have failed your exam and are now blocked from accessing me. You're dismissed into the "Ignore Station"
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Nowhere did I state that Stan Shuffett precipitated Asian and European players in using a long bridge.
So the part that you don’t deny is your assertion that the Asians are sneaking CTE as a methodology, into their game, your inference, not a Stan claim. And you are right Stan didn’t claim the association concerning longer bridge use, you did, by inference, when you include it after your categorizations.

And BTW, who appointed you the arbiter of all things true and righteous. Screaming at people with colored text and all caps is just rude and crude. The fact that I don’t embrace CTE, does not mean I don’t have a very accurate and complete aiming system. No sweeps, no bridge adjustments, no mental gymnastics, science fact based. I just don’t try to cram it down people’s throats.
 
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