How do you know where the cueball is going ?

rementis

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I find out where the cue ball is going by asking it directly. "Where are you going, cueball?" No need to be overly polite, just ask it straight up.
 

swest

goldmember
Silver Member
I think you've asked two, very different, questions (IMHO).

JoeyInCali said:
What do you see before you shoot ?
and
JoeyInCali said:
How do you know where the cueball is going ?

The answer to the first question is that I (try to) visualize the shot in its entirety (including my own body movements), and then I (try to) quiet my mind, and allow the shot to 'shoot itself'.

(emphasis on 'try to')

For the second, I rely on experience, basic principles, and memory.
 
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Tim-n-NM

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Visualization. thats what i do. I see it and then it goes there. I really never think about the process. but thats just me.
 

manwon

"WARLOCK 1"
Silver Member
What do you see before you shoot ?

In most cases the 90% deflection rule is where you start, then you must factor in the spin placed upon the cue ball, last you follow the tangent line too it's destination based upon the speed and spin induced motion.

JIMO
 

Cue Alchemist

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I see the path the cb will travel in my head.Then it's just a case of following through with the plan:smile: Also seeing patterns in a rack after you break helps you visualize the path!
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
What do you see before you shoot ?

I usually see my object ball hitting the rail a good two to three inches from the intended pocket, my cue ball kicking off of three balls and scratching, then my opponent running out the rack, me losing another match, then I see myself sitting dejectedly at my table throwin' back some Crown Royal :eek:, Gotta love pool, eh???

Maniac
 

pulldapin

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Aloha, I visualize the tanget after contact and adjust with top and bottom center on the verticle when not using my third eye. When I'm using my third eye I am unconcious and I don't know what I'm doing.:wink: Mahalo Carl
 

emf123

Up the Irons!!!
Silver Member
You don't just "see" where it's going, you "feel" it. The correct term, as Bob Fancher would call it, is "sensuous imagery".
 

GaryB

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you are trying to learn position, the best place to start is learning how to make a stop shot at any distance. The tangent line is based on a stop, or stun shot. (Stop shot stops the cb dead, a stun shot is the same reaction on the cb, that is, a sliding cue ball at contact, but the cb hits the ob at an angle so it doesn't stop).

Once you have stop shots down, then it is just a matter of looking at your tangent line, and seeing where that goes. Often, that is all you have to do. If you need to change the tangent line, you can add follow or draw. Once you hit the rail, you can change the angle coming off the rail with english.

Experience is the best option for learning these angles. I can tell you that one tip of right will do this, but if you don't have the same stroke I do, and the same speed, your results will vary. Start with stop shots, and practice from there.

Lil Joe Villanpando's (sp?) Cue Ball IQ video shows you what happens clearer than any book or verbal explanation. You watch that and your mind goes "Duh." You then have a consistant visualization for the rest of your pool life. Yes, you still need to practice to fine tune within fractions. Thanks Joe!
 

GaryB

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you are trying to learn position, the best place to start is learning how to make a stop shot at any distance. The tangent line is based on a stop, or stun shot. (Stop shot stops the cb dead, a stun shot is the same reaction on the cb, that is, a sliding cue ball at contact, but the cb hits the ob at an angle so it doesn't stop).

Once you have stop shots down, then it is just a matter of looking at your tangent line, and seeing where that goes. Often, that is all you have to do. If you need to change the tangent line, you can add follow or draw. Once you hit the rail, you can change the angle coming off the rail with english.

Experience is the best option for learning these angles. I can tell you that one tip of right will do this, but if you don't have the same stroke I do, and the same speed, your results will vary. Start with stop shots, and practice from there.

Lil Joe Villanpando's (sp?) Cue Ball IQ video shows you what happens clearer than any book or verbal explanation. You watch that and your mind goes "Duh." You then have a consistant visualization for the rest of your pool life. Simple, clearly presented and bingo you understand tangents and how you can accurately change the end results. Still requires practice but it is fulfilling practice. Thanks Joe!
 

hitman jones

Registered
hello

it goes on the tangent line call lil joe with pool iq and tell him todd jones told u to call he will hook u up he has a killer video on cue ball control he is my sons teacher hes the best
 

Ratta

Hearing the balls.....
Silver Member
Hussa,

1.) Walk *behind* the OB to stand in a straight line how the OB should go into the pocket- to visualize the contact point.

2.) Walk behind the CB- align myself- go down into the line to shoot the CB to the contact-point (the point on the OB i detected before)- now i m usualy aligned *perfectly*.

3.) 3 slow pre-(test strokes)--Last Check if the alignment still is good-point of contact on the CB still is ok-- Stop at CB with the tip (about 1-2inches)-

4.) Eyes onto the Contact-Point AT THE OBJECT-BALL WHICH WAS DEFINED AS THE TARGET!

5.) Backswing and GO.

6.) Staying down until stroke is finished

Happy-End and next one........lol^^
___________________________________________
How do you know where the cueball is going ? <--- Just believing in my stroke
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do you see before you shoot ? <------Object-Ball (Contactpoint on the OB)
________________________________________________________________________
Makes no matter if i would watch in Point 1.) just for a contact-point or for the point of the Ghostball--or what else-would make no difference at all. Just an important part of the Pre-Shot-Routine.
And sure i could divide the process into some more several points-- but i hope JoeyinCali meant this when he asked here in the thread.

lg from overseas,

Ingo
 
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dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
FYI, there are numerous articles, video demonstrations, and other resources on this topic here:
Can you just give an answer instead of a link.
Yes, but I think the link is much more useful than a short text-only answer. But since you asked, here you go:

For a stun shot, the CB heads along the tangent line. This is the 90-degree rule.

For a rolling CB shot, the CB heads in the natural angle direction predicted by the 30-degree rule.

For a good action draw shot, the CB heads in the trisect system direction.

With more speed and cue elevation, the CB persists longer in the tangent line direction before curving (see HSV B.23).​

If people want more details, illustrations, examples, articles, and video demonstrations, they can click on the links.

Regards,
Dave
 

cookie man

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yes, but I think the link is much more useful than a short text-only answer. But since you asked, here you go:

For a stun shot, the CB heads along the tangent line. This is the 90-degree rule.

For a rolling CB shot, the CB heads in the natural angle direction predicted by the 30-degree rule.

For a good action draw shot, the CB heads in the trisect system direction.

With more speed and cue elevation, the CB persists longer in the tangent line direction before curving (see HSV B.23).​

If people want more details, illustrations, examples, articles, and video demonstrations, they can click on the links.

Regards,
Dave
Trisect system- wow you have to pivot your hand and make a peace sign, sounds very unnatural and complicated, think I'll pass.
 
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