[idea/question] Training stroke straighness with elastic bands

scratchandrun

New member
Would it add any benefit if i attached an elastic band on a cue that is configured to move straight (by attaching it to a setup/device that only allows straight movement)
What i am trying to figure out here is: does the added resistance to the forward and back motion help make the move easier when there is no resistance?
My idea result here is that
1. i adjust my stance to accomodate the straight movement of the cue
2. i can accelerate easier after the pause on the final backstroke

This is a somewhat known method for other sports where athletes for example run or train with added weights on their hands/chest etc.
If this technique already exists please let me know of how i can further read about it.

Thanks
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
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could you post a pic/video of the set up you are describing?
 

FranCrimi

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Interesting idea, but I don't think it will work. First, it doesn't address some of the habits that cause a player to move their cue offline, such as twisting and other various hand movements while the cue is in motion. Second, I don't think that a resistance band would help a players' timing. The timing of a pool stroke is not a strength-related issue. Also, with a resistance band, there is a release. The release will always be a particular speed depending on the amount pulled back. That's not true with a pool stroke. The forward motion changes, but the backstroke speed stays pretty much constant. Some players tend to react differently when shooting at different speeds that can cause their cues to move offline, which a resistance band wouldn't address also.
 

Bob Jewett

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...
If this technique already exists please let me know of how i can further read about it.
Multiple devices have been invented that force a straight stroke but I don't think I've seen one that uses springs or bands. I think the straightness is the important part and that doesn't need springyness. As Fran mentioned, the player's proper development of timing would be hindered by the added force. Maybe it would help to get a faster break shot.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
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Or just practice stroking with the shaft over a straight line, like the cloth edge on the rail. It’s not an overnight fix either way - your arm has to “memorize” the motion.

pj
chgo
If you're doing the cloth edge line along a rail drill, you just have to make sure you are in a proper shooting stance and not just standing sideways to the rail.
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
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It's unfortunate that Tony Mattina no longer manufactures Cue Track: Precision-Engineered Stroke Trainer.

I've witnessed even professional players improve their game using Cue Track. It's great stuff! However, you can create a similar training tool by practicing your stroke between two chalk cubes.

Hint: Don't obsess over having a laser-straight motion with your stroke hand, as this can paradoxically lead to an uneven movement. Instead, focus on a smooth, fluid motion. A properly placed bridge hand will naturally help ensure a straight stroke.
 

tomatoshooter

Well-known member
If you're doing the cloth edge line along a rail drill, you just have to make sure you are in a proper shooting stance and not just standing sideways to the rail.
That's why I like the tape measure. And my bridge is on the same Southaven as when I'm actually shooting. I find out easier to judge the straightness seeing the yellow tape on both sides of the cue instead of the edge of the rail under the center.
 

BC21

https://www.playpoolbetter.com
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Multiple devices have been invented that force a straight stroke but I don't think I've seen one that uses springs or bands. I think the straightness is the important part and that doesn't need springyness. As Fran mentioned, the player's proper development of timing would be hindered by the added force. Maybe it would help to get a faster break shot.

A neat device could use rubber bands as guides, where resistance would only be felt when the stroke starts to deviate from the desired straight path. Not sure how someone would design a stroke trainer like that, but I'm sure it could be done. It would be interesting to see such a contraption.
 
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Bob Jewett

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I neat device could use rubber bands as guides, where resistance would only be felt when the stroke starts to deviate from the desired straight path. Not sure how someone would design a stroke trainer like that, but I'm sure it could be done. It would be interesting to see such a contraption.
A rod coming straight out of the back of the cue and placed between two vertical plates would do the job.

If you had two strings going sideways from the butt and tied to supports, the cue could move forward/back easily but would be hard to pull to the side. I think the body might be in the way at the end of the stroke. Also, the strings have to be exactly perpendicular to the shot line. Similarly, the plates would have to be moved for each new shot in the rod scheme.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.

There is a product like this. I didn't find it all that useful but I could see where it could have it's benefits. My stroke was already pretty straight so I didn't use it more than a couple times.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
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I neat device could use rubber bands as guides, where resistance would only be felt when the stroke starts to deviate from the desired straight path.
A rod coming straight out of the back of the cue and placed between two vertical plates would do the job.
These sound useful for helping to familiarize the arm with a straight stroke. I'd also (or instead) use the same kind of check for the shaft, to help train the eyes to see it.

pj
chgo
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member

There is a product like this. I didn't find it all that useful but I could see where it could have it's benefits. My stroke was already pretty straight so I didn't use it more than a couple times.
I carry a third eye device in my bag because many players believe they are aiming at the cue ball where their cue tip isn't actually pointing.
 
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