Inlays in the forearm ...?

WilleeCue

The Barefoot Cuemaker
Silver Member
When cutting inlay pockets in the forearm of a cue it is important to get the cutter exactly on the center line of the forearm.
Because of the round shape of the forearm, cutting to a depth of .11" at the center dont leave much room for error with a .5" wide inlay.
If it is off one side will be deeper than the other side.
Worst case is that there will not be any depth at one of the the outer edges of the pocket.

What would be a good method of setting the cutter bit exactly on the center line of the forearm?

center.jpg
 
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str8eight

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Set your z a few thou from the surface of the forearm. While lowering your cutter a thou or so at a time sweep across the forearm until you make contact. Center your end mill on the cut you just made and you’re done.


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DaveK

Still crazy after all these years
Silver Member
Do cuemakers use edge finders ?


That is how this non-cuemaker finds the edge of a round thing ... and then moves over one radius-of-the-round-thing to get centered.

Dave
 

Newsheriffintwn

Newsheriff Custom Cues
Gold Member
Silver Member
Before loading the cue in whatever jig you're using to hold it under the cutter, move the spindle over and center it on the point of the live or dead center you're using to hold the cue. I'm assuming you are using a center to hold the ends of the cue. Once dialed in reset your zero and off to the races..
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
Before loading the cue in whatever jig you're using to hold it under the cutter, move the spindle over and center it on the point of the live or dead center you're using to hold the cue. I'm assuming you are using a center to hold the ends of the cue. Once dialed in reset your zero and off to the races..
Currently, I don'y do inlays, but using my CNC Mill, I put a 60 degree engraving bit in the spindle and do just as you described, then change out the bit to whatever I am using and go from there. the Y center is good to go
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
Once you find center set it at zero in a currently unused offset and never look for it again.
 

63Kcode

AKA Larry Vigus
Silver Member
Set your z a few thou from the surface of the forearm. While lowering your cutter a thou or so at a time sweep across the forearm until you make contact. Center your end mill on the cut you just made and you’re done.


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I am surprised how few people know this trick. i read about it in Mr. Hightower’s book.

Larry
 

Hits 'em Hard

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If ones cutter isn’t centered, and they’re unable to figure out to find it. I’d be willing to bet their bit isn’t perpendicular to the cue either.
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Thanks, I appreciate it. Always admired your work. Always trying to get better at this for sure but I've had a bit of help along the way. Vigus, Nemeck, Rounceville, Cohen, DZ, Haley etc. Typically when you find someone who is successful at an endeavor you'll usually find they have a mentor(s).


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When you surround yourself with world class it's easy to become the same.
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Wish I was gifted and knew it all but alas I am just a normal human being.
Is it fun to berate or insult others or does it just make you feel more manly?
I'm sure you are gifted at something, I just doubt it's at building a pool cue if you can't figure out how to do one of the simplest and most fundamental ops that one might have to execute in their shop.
Good God...just once, think outside the box even if it's only for 30 seconds of your life.
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
I'm sure you are gifted at something, I just doubt it's at building a pool cue if you can't figure out how to do one of the simplest and most fundamental ops that one might have to execute in their shop.
Good God...just once, think outside the box even if it's only for 30 seconds of your life.
Didn't you ask me if I was "having a bad day" a while back?

In retrospect, my day was grand now that I have something to compare it to.

:ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Didn't you ask me if I was "having a bad day" a while back?

In retrospect, my day was grand now that I have something to compare it to.

:ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
I'm only trying to help. Some people just need a little nudge in the right direction. ;)
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
Set your z a few thou from the surface of the forearm. While lowering your cutter a thou or so at a time sweep across the forearm until you make contact. Center your end mill on the cut you just made and you’re done.


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If you center your end mill on a cut across the surface at some point you're "eyeballing" center anyway right? Even if you're within a couple of thou.

Why not just eyeball center by lowering your endmill in front of one of your centers if you're going to end up guestimating exact center anyway? Seems a lot quicker and easier.

Ring billets are where lack of exact center can really bite you in my limited experience as they are less forgiving than inlays.
 

str8eight

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you center your end mill on a cut across the surface at some point you're "eyeballing" center anyway right? Even if you're within a couple of thou.

Why not just eyeball center by lowering your endmill in front of one of your centers if you're going to end up guestimating exact center anyway? Seems a lot quicker and easier.

Ring billets are where lack of exact center can really bite you in my limited experience as they are less forgiving than inlays.

Eyeballing will get you within a couple of thou pretty easily. There are other methods if you want to be dead nuts. If centers are aligned then sure you can do it your way without any issues.


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JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
Eyeballing will get you within a couple of thou pretty easily. There are other methods if you want to be dead nuts. If centers are aligned then sure you can do it your way without any issues.


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The way I described isn't the way I do it but it came to mind as you are eventually down to eyeballing with either method. I guess if your centers are off you have an entire other set of issues making centering the bit moot.
 

mrkdenton

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
"This is not a spoon feed forum". You're right, Dave...this is an "Ask the Cuemaker" forum.

All the OP did was ask a question that cuemakers would have knowledge of. 5 people (so far) offered answers to the question that he asked.

When you come along and deem the question not worthy and put the guy down for asking, it doesn't matter who you've helped in PM-land. In this instance right now, you're one of those forum A-holes that everyone hates. And the only thing worse than the forum A-hole, is the forum A-hole that digs in and doubles down on their A-hole-ness.

Don't be a forum A-hole, Dave.
wow. you took the words right out of my mouth sir. like you were reading my mind
 

str8eight

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The way I described isn't the way I do it but it came to mind as you are eventually down to eyeballing with either method. I guess if your centers are off you have an entire other set of issues making centering the bit moot.

The method I described will lessen the issue with centers being off. Centering to the location you're going to be inlaying.


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Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
going back to my earlier post about using an engraving bit, I use Mach3 at 5% speed to jog the alignment of the bit to the drive and tail centers. Hit the zero button for that axis....and done.
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20210708_170340.jpg
 

WilleeCue

The Barefoot Cuemaker
Silver Member
I apologize to everyone for asking such a dumb question and starting a flame war.
That was not my intent.

Only make 1 or 2 cues a month on average.
I sell them to the local players and like the concept of "try it before you buy it".

I have long ago found the truth that the price of a cue is a poor indicator as to its quality or play-ability.
What is a bad feeling cue in one persons hands is the holy grail in someone else's.

In the past I have taken part in flame wars in the misguided belief that I needed to defend myself of show off my superior intelligence.
The reality was that I accomplished just the opposite.
I try to learn from my mistakes and when possible learn from other's mistakes as well.
So if I have offended anyone by posting my dumb ass question here I truly apologize and beg forgiveness.
 
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