Interesting pool story in the news

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
The model for poolplayers in the Philippines is not much different than the one in place here. The top players have sponsors/backers who pay their expenses to compete in tournaments over here in return for a cut of the winnings. A typical full sponsorship deal may result in a player like Carlo keeping 50% of whatever prize money he wins, with the other half going to their sponsor. A very highly regarded player like Dennis who has a long track record of success can make an even better deal, perhaps keeping up to two-thirds of his winnings. As one would expect it's not inexpensive for Filipino players to compete over here, with airfares, hotels and entry fees to be paid. It takes a sponsor with deep pockets to foot the bill for them and is risky with an unproven player, no matter how good he is. Even a top player like Anton Raga needs a good sponsor (who will also expedite his visa application) before he can travel to the United States or Europe to play. Most of the up and coming players over there must cut their teeth on Asian events first and show a high level of success before they can hope to get the necessary sponsorship to compete over here.
 
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Nick B

This is gonna hurt
Silver Member
The model for poolplayers in the Philippines is not much different than the one in place here. The top players have sponsors/backers who pay their expenses to compete in tournaments over here in return for a cut of the winnings. A typical full sponsorship deal may result in a player like Carlo keeping 50% of whatever prize money he wins, with the other half going to their sponsor. A very highly regarded player like Dennis who has a long track record of success can make an even better deal, perhaps keeping up to two-thirds of his winnings. As one would expect it's not inexpensive for Filipino players to compete over here, with airfares, hotels and entry fees to be paid. It takes a sponsor with deep pockets to foot the bill for them and is risky with an unproven player, no matter how good he is. Even a top player like Anton Raga needs a good sponsor (who will also expedite his visa application) before he can travel to the United States or Europe to play. Most of the up and coming players over there must cut their teeth on Asian events first and show a high level of success before they can hope to get the necessary sponsorship to compete over here.
About 10 min after Biado won I wondered to myself how much of the 50K he would actually keep. I figure the prize money would have to double and we need at least 50% more tournament calendar to make the math work for at least the Top 20. Anything else and it's just a passion project.

Matchroom and others are making a difference, Lets see where we get to in 5 years.
 

jokrswylde

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The related billiards article cited at the bottom of that web-page is also well worth reading. It fully dimensionalizes the situation (and amount of opportunities) confronting top-level Filipino players:

"Win or don’t eat: PH’s poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars
Billiards drive to find fresh talents ‘futile’ "

https://sports.inquirer.net/60020/billiards-drive-to-find-fresh-talents-futile

Arnaldo
Sounds like they are having similar issues as us....young players can make more money hustling/ playing money games than they can playing for the national team in international tournaments.

I wonder if that gambling culture is prevalent in other Asian countries(China, Taiwan, Korea, etc. )...One of my good buddies was stationed in Korea in the early -mid 90's. He said there was pool action everywhere...
 

u12armresl

One Pocket back cutter
Silver Member
The model for poolplayers in the Philippines is not much different than the one in place here. The top players have sponsors/backers who pay their expenses to compete in tournaments over here in return for a cut of the winnings. A typical full sponsorship deal may result in a player like Carlo keeping 50% of whatever prize money he wins, with the other half going to their sponsor. A very highly regarded player like Dennis who has a long track record of success can make an even better deal, perhaps keeping up to two-thirds of his winnings. As one would expect it's not inexpensive for Filipino players to compete over here, with airfares, hotels and entry fees to be paid. It takes a sponsor with deep pockets to foot the bill for them and is risky with an unproven player, no matter how good he is. Even a top player like Anton Raga needs a good sponsor (who will also expedite his visa application) before he can travel to the United States or Europe to play. Most of the up and coming players over there must cut their teeth on Asian events first and show a high level of success before they can hope to get the necessary sponsorship to compete over here.
2/3 Jay, that's a huge cut, especially considering the stupid amount you'd have to win to cover 1 loss. 25k 50k match, that would sting.
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
There is very little difference other than the scale of the economy for PI pool players and American ones.

Having spent most of their lives from an early age obsessed with pool and it's culture these people for the most part are qualified for little else than a minimum wage job. Which of course they have no interest in showing up for and performing and working their way up from.

Yes there are top players not in this mold but the road there is paved with the other ones. Pool can't change it's image until it can attract people who aren't bums.
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
2/3 Jay, that's a huge cut, especially considering the stupid amount you'd have to win to cover 1 loss. 25k 50k match, that would sting.
I was referring to pool tournament sponsorship only. It's a different story and a very different arrangement when you're talking about big money matches. It's more like the player is getting one third of a big score, and in some cases even less.
 

Wolven

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There is very little difference other than the scale of the economy for PI pool players and American ones.

Having spent most of their lives from an early age obsessed with pool and it's culture these people for the most part are qualified for little else than a minimum wage job. Which of course they have no interest in showing up for and performing and working their way up from.

Yes there are top players not in this mold but the road there is paved with the other ones. Pool can't change it's image until it can attract people who aren't bums.

So, what you saying is that people who dedicate themselves to pool are bums, and that you are better than them because you make 2nd tier cues?
 
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JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
So, what you saying is that people who dedicate themselves to pool are bums, and that you are better than them because you make a 2nd tier cues?
My cues are third tier but it's a hobby. I'm saying most of the people I know who's only interest in life is the pool culture are bums, yes. One in a thousand of them can make a living at it if even that many. They tend to be moochie and parasitic.
 

Wolven

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My cues are third tier but it's a hobby. I'm saying most of the people I know who's only interest in life is the pool culture are bums, yes. One in a thousand of them can make a living at it if even that many. They tend to be moochie and parasitic.
Your original comments were not about people you know.

It is kind of sad that people who dedicate themselves to pursuit of something cannot make a living doing what they love. If they made sacrifices and worked hard at the game, and in the end just did not have enough talent, then it is kind of tragic. I have known many men that gave everything they had in the pursuit of their passion (not pool). Most people cannot understand men like that, because most people have never been that good at anything in their life. So, if someone reaches lets say top 2%-3% in their sport, and that's just not good enough to make a living, well that is kind of sad because it takes a lot of time and dedication to get there.
I find people that throw around generalized judgments like you did, to be a self-righteous you know what.
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
Your original comments were not about people you know.

It is kind of sad that people who dedicate themselves to pursuit of something cannot make a living doing what they love. If they made sacrifices and worked hard at the game, and in the end just did not have enough talent, then it is kind of tragic. I have known many men that gave everything they had in the pursuit of their passion (not pool). Most people cannot understand men like that, because most people have never been that good at anything in their life. So, if someone reaches lets say top 2%-3% in their sport, and that's just not good enough to make a living, well that is kind of sad because it takes a lot of time and dedication to get there.
I find people that throw around generalized judgments like you did, to be a self-righteous you know what.
Sorry if the truth hurts but it doesn't make it false.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
Your original comments were not about people you know.

It is kind of sad that people who dedicate themselves to pursuit of something cannot make a living doing what they love. If they made sacrifices and worked hard at the game, and in the end just did not have enough talent, then it is kind of tragic. I have known many men that gave everything they had in the pursuit of their passion (not pool). Most people cannot understand men like that, because most people have never been that good at anything in their life. So, if someone reaches lets say top 2%-3% in their sport, and that's just not good enough to make a living, well that is kind of sad because it takes a lot of time and dedication to get there.
I find people that throw around generalized judgments like you did, to be a self-righteous you know what.
Fact is, there's only about 20 players in the world that actually make a living playing pool professionally, so what does that say about the rest of the millions of players around the world pursuing playing pool as a Profession?
 

ghost ball

justnum survivor
Silver Member
Fact is, there's only about 20 players in the world that actually make a living playing pool professionally, so what does that say about the rest of the millions of players around the world pursuing playing pool as a Profession?
It says, according to your data and god knows we know you are 110% always right, that if you want to make a living in pool, you better be in the top 20.
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
Your original comments were not about people you know.

It is kind of sad that people who dedicate themselves to pursuit of something cannot make a living doing what they love. If they made sacrifices and worked hard at the game, and in the end just did not have enough talent, then it is kind of tragic. I have known many men that gave everything they had in the pursuit of their passion (not pool). Most people cannot understand men like that, because most people have never been that good at anything in their life. So, if someone reaches lets say top 2%-3% in their sport, and that's just not good enough to make a living, well that is kind of sad because it takes a lot of time and dedication to get there.
I find people that throw around generalized judgments like you did, to be a self-righteous you know what.
Being a pool player just falls into the same category as many many pursuits. Want to be an artist, stand up comedian, actor, writer, musician, animal breeder, farmer, activist, beekeeper and almost any athlete. I could go on and probably list a thousand professions that have very little possability of financial rewards. Are all these people all bums?
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
Fact is, there's only about 20 players in the world that actually make a living playing pool professionally, so what does that say about the rest of the millions of players around the world pursuing playing pool as a Profession?
It says like most of the Olympic events, they're essentially playing an amateur sport.
 
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