Keilwood shafts

Coos Cues

Coos Cues
Are you able to buy the blanks at different grades? I'm sure there is some type of certification to be qualified as Kielwood.
There was a thread here a while back talking about keilwood. It was pointed out correctly that the term was coined by one cue supplier to describe his torrefied maple wood. Like Kleenex describes one company's tissues.

So technically in order to be "qualified as keilwood" it has to come from him.

I personally have built many torrefied shafts and even more hard maple and at 600 fargo speed I frankly can't feel any difference based only on the wood. Nor is the torrified wood necessarily lighter. But it does accent certain cues nicely in coloration. Not saying science doesn't say they play different but I sure can't feel it. And just like hard maple some blanks have the "it" factor and others don't. It's still a god made product with huge variations.

And I use CNC to taper all my shafts. Very easy to make minor adjustments this way.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
There was a thread here a while back talking about keilwood. It was pointed out correctly that the term was coined by one cue supplier to describe his torrefied maple wood. Like Kleenex describes one company's tissues.

So technically in order to be "qualified as keilwood" it has to come from him.

I personally have built many torrefied shafts and even more hard maple and at 600 fargo speed I frankly can't feel any difference based only on the wood. Nor is the torrified wood necessarily lighter. But it does accent certain cues nicely in coloration. Not saying science doesn't say they play different but I sure can't feel it. And just like hard maple some blanks have the "it" factor and others don't. It's still a god made product with huge variations.

And I use CNC to taper all my shafts. Very easy to make minor adjustments this way.
I'm really sensitive to sounds, the keilwood/torrified seems to "sing" or ring out more than standard maple.

I think it's much harder, if not impossible to actually steam out dings in keilwood like you would on regular maple. I love my keilwood shaft but I'm honestly thinking about going back to either maple or CF just for this fact. I try to treat my equipment well but dings happen in the real world.

I have a probably 30 year old McDermott shaft with no dings (thanks to knowing how to steam them out occasionally) and I have a keilwood shaft about a year old with 4 dings that will not steam out. It's annoying.

I love how it plays and how it sounds though.
 

Sheldon

dontneednostinkintitle
Silver Member
Torrified maple breaks easier. Removing the moisture makes it more prone to cracking.
 

DJKeys

Sound Design
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'm really sensitive to sounds, the keilwood/torrified seems to "sing" or ring out more than standard maple.

I think it's much harder, if not impossible to actually steam out dings in keilwood like you would on regular maple. I love my keilwood shaft but I'm honestly thinking about going back to either maple or CF just for this fact. I try to treat my equipment well but dings happen in the real world.

I have a probably 30 year old McDermott shaft with no dings (thanks to knowing how to steam them out occasionally) and I have a keilwood shaft about a year old with 4 dings that will not steam out. It's annoying.

I love how it plays and how it sounds though.
I have banged my Hsunami shaft a number of times. A little very hot water on a microfiber towel raises the grain and takes the ding out like a standard maple shaft-

-dj
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
I have banged my Hsunami shaft a number of times. A little very hot water on a microfiber towel raises the grain and takes the ding out like a standard maple shaft-

-dj
I'll have to try that, I was using a layer of wet paper towel and a soldering iron. Thanks for the advice.
 
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