Open- or closed-bridge hand and gloves?

JAM

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
At the recent European Open, I noticed some of the younger competitors used an open-hand bridge for all shots, which I found interesting. I also follow snooker competitions, and they seem to all use the open-bridge hand.

My other half as well as myself, we both use a closed-bridge hand.

Would love to learn some info on the pros and cons of each. If, say, Joshua Filler, one of the best in the world, is using an open-bridge hand, there must be something to it.

Also, before the final match at the European Open, Anton Raga was continuing to run down the clock because he kept running to his designated chair to wipe down his cue with a towel as well as his hands. I know some who suffer from a sweaty hand syndrome, as it's a medical condition. I brought this up in a Window's Open podcast in a discussion about the European Open before the finals, and the Filipino attendees chimed in that Anton was used to using powder in Philippines, and you cannot use powder in the Matchroom competitions; thus, why he was using the towel and wiping his hands on his pants. In some matches, Anton was not wearing a pool glove, but in the finals with David Alcaide, he was wearing a gray pool glove and didn't seem to run down the clock as much. He does use an open-hand bridge, though.

Just a few observations from a railbird. Thoughts?

2023-European-Open-Day-3_Anton-Raga.jpg
 

skogstokig

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
joshua filler uses a closed bridge a lot. most players switch between the two depending on the shot. open bridge is good for long shots or where sighting is more important than power. look at power draw shots and you'll see both raga, filler and others use the closed bridge.

powder does cause problems with the shot clock
 

Zerksies

Well-known member
I'm using a open bridge, from what i have found out my stoke is wobbly and shifts side to side. With an open bridge I can see my swing and make sure everything is moving straight. I can get a lower and a more level stroke with an open bridge, with a closed bridge it's more of a down angle. I can also see more of how i am aiming with a open bridge. I can also get more pinpoint hit on the CB with a open bridge, I don't have that finger blocking my view. I'm really only using a closed bridge with a draw shot and I am trying to move away from that.

I switched to a open bridge years ago. For me it was almost instant improvement as soon as i got use to the bridge style.

Most of these kids are standing very low to the table i would feel that an open bridge gives more of a line of sight, just like shooting down a barrel of a gun.

I'm using a carbon fiber shaft and no glove.
 

TrxR

Well-known member
I use a open bridge mostly but tend to use a closed bridge on heavy draw shots and when breaking.
 
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King T

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
At the recent European Open, I noticed some of the younger competitors used an open-hand bridge for all shots, which I found interesting. I also follow snooker competitions, and they seem to all use the open-bridge hand.

My other half as well as myself, we both use a closed-bridge hand.

Would love to learn some info on the pros and cons of each. If, say, Joshua Filler, one of the best in the world, is using an open-bridge hand, there must be something to it.

Also, before the final match at the European Open, Anton Raga was continuing to run down the clock because he kept running to his designated chair to wipe down his cue with a towel as well as his hands. I know some who suffer from a sweaty hand syndrome, as it's a medical condition. I brought this up in a Window's Open podcast in a discussion about the European Open before the finals, and the Filipino attendees chimed in that Anton was used to using powder in Philippines, and you cannot use powder in the Matchroom competitions; thus, why he was using the towel and wiping his hands on his pants. In some matches, Anton was not wearing a pool glove, but in the finals with David Alcaide, he was wearing a gray pool glove and didn't seem to run down the clock as much. He does use an open-hand bridge, though.

Just a few observations from a railbird. Thoughts?

View attachment 713705
You make a very interesting observation. A friend and I were discussing the same thing when I notiched the almost all the players in during the World Cup of Pool were using a open-bridge on cut shoots? Reberto Gomez told me that it allowed for better sighting on some shoots?
 
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stewie

Active member
I started with a closed bridge, but years ago a coach made me change to open to stop banging too much. The open bridge forced me to play softer, in general. Still break with a closed bridge.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
The shot dictates whether I use an open or closed bridge. For me, acquiring a proper closed bridge was a very awkward undertaking -- but, eventually, I got it. I tell beginners to use an open bridge and work toward closed. In evaluating the two, it occurred to me that the closed provided more points of contact and that more contact should result in more cue control/guidance. (If this is in fact true, the closed would benefit the beginner but become less useful as one's game improved.) As I get older, arthritis will likely dictate resort to an open bridge.
 

tim913

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
One pool school I attended years ago, for 3 days, would not allow us to use a closed bridge
 

tim913

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
They said the closed bridge hides flaws in your stroke and they wanted to see the stroke, to finish, without the cue lifting off of your bridge hand. They said a closed bridge would not allow this to be seen since the finger over the top would hold the cue down.
 
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westcoast

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just go by what intuitively feels right regarding open or closed bridging.

I know people can still execute draw shots with an open bridge, but I much prefer a closed bridge for such shots.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
They said the closed bridge hides flaws in your stroke and they wanted to see the stroke, to finish, without the cue lifting off of your bridge hand. They said a closed bridge would not allow this to be seen since the finger over the top would hold the cue down.
thanks for the reply
 

justadub

Rattling corners nightly
Silver Member
The towel. All well-dressed athletes wear one.

View attachment 713738
One wonders if that Matchroom might not have let him have a towel attached to his person...cuz it sure seems to me to make more sense to have it stuck in his belt or something, rather than running back to his chair every shot. I presume Matchroom has a pretty specific dress code, and maybe a towel would violate some rule?
 
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