Pocket size?

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The common sense answer is - from ALL of the above- the only true way to set up a home table that is best for you is to try various tables/pockets and THEN make your own decision. Please DO NOT make a decision on pocket size based on this forum- we are all over the place on the answer.

It is not an easily reversible decision once implemented, a change will involve considerable expense to be done correctly. As some have mentioned, and I also once experienced this, due to the hassle and expense of making a change, you may end up living unhappily with your chosen table set up if you do not verify your choice up front via trial and error on various tables.
 
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Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The challenge is finding different pocket sizes referred to as tight vs. enormous.
In my opinion, 5” CP are enormous and 4.5” would be tight. Finding tables with
pockets any smaller would be a challenge since pool halls want customers to
do repeat business. Make the pockets any tighter doesn’t encourage that but a
few pool halls have some 9’ tables with very tight pockets that you’ll usually find
the really best players using. It all comes down to one’s expectations & enjoyment.
That’s nice box, very nice!
 
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MurrayNevada

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member

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TrxR

Member
The problem here is there is not too many options around to try. The local area only has 8' valley coin tables or 9' Palasons at the Dooleys. There were a couple of 8' Dufferins around but they seemed to have dissappeared when the place changed ownership. Im not sure what the pocket size is in either the Valleys or the Palasons.

Im thinking i would go 4.5"
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The problem here is there is not too many options around to try. The local area only has 8' valley coin tables or 9' Palasons at the Dooleys. There were a couple of 8' Dufferins around but they seemed to have dissappeared when the place changed ownership. Im not sure what the pocket size is in either the Valleys or the Palasons.

Im thinking i would go 4.5"
4.5” CP are the largest size I’d use and expect to struggle when first installed.
But that’s okay. Just think of it as starting your 1st gym membership or a diet.

The catch is you will get better. You will master cue ball & object ball speeds.
Your friends that play on your table would be at a disadvantage unlike yourself.

And when you play on tables with more generous pocket sizes, you should play
better. It’s no guarantee since on any given day, even better players can struggle.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The problem here is there is not too many options around to try. The local area only has 8' valley coin tables or 9' Palasons at the Dooleys. There were a couple of 8' Dufferins around but they seemed to have dissappeared when the place changed ownership. Im not sure what the pocket size is in either the Valleys or the Palasons.

Im thinking i would go 4.5"
wth is a Palason?
 

mattb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
For the casual player, practicer and friends and family over to play, 4.5 pro cut is perfect. For more serious play, 4.25 is really good but your casual playing opponents will not like it. Anything tighter should not be an option unless you are planning to go out on the pro tour Or are a glutton for punishment.
 

Konrad

Your wushu is weak!
It’s an older model Olhausen.
If I saw an olhausen with those pockets I’m not even taking my cue out of the case. 4.75”- 5” on olhausen. Everything else 4.5”. I personally play too “fast” for an olhausen. Not fast as in better, I don’t even like playing when those corners are 4.5”.

Even practicing on 4.5” will improve you game a lot. Those 4.75” corners literally will swallow up everything for you after getting good on 4.5”. If the table is only for me maybe 4-3/8”. Like others have said. It takes the fun out of it for some and I have some little ones and not so good friends who like to play.
 
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cjr3559

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I grew up playing on a 4x8 with what I think were (at least) 5” shallow sloped craters. A ball could be completely within the jaws and you could fire another ball right past without even a nudge.

Needless to say when I grew up 30 years later I wanted something with a challenge, and the 4.5 inchers on my GC5 are just the right size of challenging without being frustrating. It’s great for 1 Pocket and Rotation games, but wish they were a little looser for 14.1.

Personally I think anything tighter than 4.5” is for training.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Here's another kicker to ponder over. Pocket geometry is also important. A 5" Olhausen for example just might play as tough as a 4.5" in another brand due to the angle of the pocket facing. I'd say a 5" Olhausen plays about like a 4.5-4.75" in another brand. They are notorious for "pocket rattle" for this reason. Basically with an Olhausen, you have to shoot pocket speed or where the pocket cutout meets the cushion or you can risk rattle.

My home table is an 8.5' (oversize 8) Olhausen that I did a lot of work on to correct pocket geometry. The pockets ended up 4 3/8" because that's how much I had to close them to correct the wonky angles without doing subrail work. It plays closer to most pro cut pockets now without the wonky-ness. I forget what the original pocket dimensions were, but even at 4 3/8" it now plays easier than it did with the original rattler cut pockets. It's not an easy table, but a well hit ball goes, where before it might go or it might end up rattled out. For 9B especially sometimes you have to put a little "heat" on the ball to get shape which wasn't possible with the stock pockets.

I'd say 4.5" is what most people would find challenging, yet enjoyable. Anything less is for tightening up your aiming or gambling. If you're learning you don't really want any tighter as it cuts off important parts of the game like cheating the pocket.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
small pockets to me at least is like raising the hoop on a basketball court in yur driveway. it might make your shotmaking improve for a while but lots of other things lose out as you are always missing .
and a big part of pool is getting position by fudging the pockets. on tight pockets that goes out.
and forcing the cue ball over and across doesnt work very well on tight pockets not because it wont go but because you miss all the time doing it.

all this lowers the fun level.
if you are buying a table to sharpen your pocketing skills then fine but for just enjoying the game and with lesser players larger pockets are best.
 

Nyquil

Active member
I have 4.75 league cuts on my diamond they definitely dont play like buckets but can be a but can be more forgiving at slower speeds. I got bigger pockets for company/young daughter. 4.5 pro's cuts are the standard though for sure. I wouldn't want tighter than that for a 9 ft diamond for a enthusiast player like myself. Diamonds do play tougher than most tables so just keep that in mind. They reject bad shots no matter the size of pocket.
 

Nyquil

Active member
I have 4.75 league cuts on my diamond they definitely dont play like buckets, but can be more forgiving at slower speeds. I got bigger pockets for company/young daughter. 4.5 pro's cuts are the standard though for sure. I wouldn't want tighter than that for a 9 ft diamond for a enthusiast player like myself. Diamonds do play tougher than most tables so just keep that in mind. They reject bad shots no matter the size of pocket.
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’d get 5” for a home table. Hi want to get in stroke at home and build my confidence.
So that when you go and play on tables with smaller pockets you can understand why you didn’t get them.
One thing is pretty certain. When you do get to play on them, it will not likely build up your confidence any.

Plus, if you play in any tournaments, the only 5” pockets you’ll probably see are the table’s side pockets.
4.5” CP, or thereabout, are what you’ll most likely be confronted with in tournaments. So get real good on
tables playing relatively easy so you can gripe about tight pockets on other tables & why it makes no sense.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So that when you go and play on tables with smaller pockets you can understand why you didn’t get them.
One thing is pretty certain. When you do get to play on them, it will not likely build up your confidence any.

Plus, if you play in any tournaments, the only 5” pockets you’ll probably see are the table’s side pockets.
4.5” CP, or thereabout, are what you’ll most likely be confronted with in tournaments. So get real good on
tables playing relatively easy so you can gripe about tight pockets on other tables & why it makes no sense.

To each his own. I spent 15 years in the pool hall playing on mostly 4.75" (double shim) and 4.5" (triple shim) GC's. Those were the gambling tables. We never played in the back which were the 5" banger tables. 15 years later I got my first home table, a GC4, with the factory 5" pocket (single shim). I have zero issues going to the triple shimmed pool hall gambling table. But my home play is more enjoyable, and I can let you my stroke more often.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The problem here is there is not too many options around to try. The local area only has 8' valley coin tables or 9' Palasons at the Dooleys. There were a couple of 8' Dufferins around but they seemed to have dissappeared when the place changed ownership. Im not sure what the pocket size is in either the Valleys or the Palasons.

Im thinking i would go 4.5"

Have you ever played on a Diamond with Pro-Cut 4.5" pockets? Especially with cloth broken in? If not, it is about 5 times harder than the tables you just described. No lie. Valley tables actually have very small pockets at the mouth, I think actually less than 4.5". But the shelf is super short, and the pocket facing angle is much different than a diamond. It is almost obtuse, where as Diamond (and Brunswick commercial tables) are acute. These factors make the tables on bar box Valley night and day easier than a Diamond.

On commercial tables, such as Diamond 7' or 9', or Brunswick GC (not Brunswick home tables), even if you go with a 5" pocket, it will play way, way tougher than a Valley with much smaller pockets, due to the slate shelf and angles.

Strongly recommend if you go Diamond to get a League Cut Pocket, which is 4.75", unless you know for sure what its like to play on a Diamond.
 
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