Pool Ball Weights

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
FYI, many years ago, I took a bunch of weight measurements at a local pool hall. Here's a summary of the results from “Ball Weight and Size Difference Effects – Part I” (BD, February, 2012):

To see how much ball weight can vary in typical conditions, I took an accurate digital scale to my local pool hall (“Match Ups” in Fort Collins, Colorado). I weighed the CB and randomly selected OBs (and the 1- ball specifically) in each of eight Valley bar boxes with the assistance and permission of the owners. (Thanks Mike and Nicole!) The CB weights were fairly consistent with an average of 5.89 oz (167 g), a minimum of 5.78 oz (164 g), and a maximum of 5.93 oz (168 g). The OB weights were lighter (2-3 percent on average) and less consistent with an average of 5.75 oz (163 g), a minimum of 5.47 oz (155 g) and a maximum of 5.89 oz (167 g). The lightest OB was a 1-ball, which makes sense based on the extra abuse it takes (but this could also just be coincidence). If the heaviest CB were paired up with the lightest OB, the percentage difference would be about 8%.

FYI, I also have more info and related video demonstrations here:

Thanks for adding. Your measurements seem to be centered more around wear of used balls (CB vs object) and how that affects playability. The purpose for my measurements was to illustrate the weight tolerances across a variety of manufacturers and sets of mostly new/slightly used examples in an effort to dispel any myths regarding the quality control (in terms of weight) of certain phenolic ball manufacturers. As the data shows, the offerings from China and South Korea have very similar weight tolerances than the gold standard Aramith Tournaments and IMO, are slightly better than a new set of Brunswick Centennials which are also made by the folks that bring us the Aramith products. At the end of the day (in terms of weight), a quality phenolic ball is just that, regardless of who it was manufactured by.

One such myth as referenced in another thread:
Screen Shot 2021-11-16 at 6.30.46 AM.png
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks for adding. Your measurements seem to be centered more around wear of used balls (CB vs object) and how that affects playability. The purpose for my measurements was to illustrate the weight tolerances across a variety of manufacturers and sets of mostly new/slightly used examples in an effort to dispel any myths regarding the quality control (in terms of weight) of certain phenolic ball manufacturers. As the data shows, the offerings from China and South Korea have very similar weight tolerances than the gold standard Aramith Tournaments and IMO, are slightly better than a new set of Brunswick Centennials which are also made by the folks that bring us the Aramith products. At the end of the day (in terms of weight), a quality phenolic ball is just that, regardless of who it was manufactured by.

One such myth as referenced in another thread:
View attachment 616680
Most co's would die for consistency and QC like that.
 

jimmyco

NRA4Life
Silver Member
FYI, many years ago, I took a bunch of weight measurements at a local pool hall. Here's a summary of the results from “Ball Weight and Size Difference Effects – Part I” (BD, February, 2012):

To see how much ball weight can vary in typical conditions, I took an accurate digital scale to my local pool hall (“Match Ups” in Fort Collins, Colorado). I weighed the CB and randomly selected OBs (and the 1- ball specifically) in each of eight Valley bar boxes with the assistance and permission of the owners. (Thanks Mike and Nicole!) The CB weights were fairly consistent with an average of 5.89 oz (167 g), a minimum of 5.78 oz (164 g), and a maximum of 5.93 oz (168 g). The OB weights were lighter (2-3 percent on average) and less consistent with an average of 5.75 oz (163 g), a minimum of 5.47 oz (155 g) and a maximum of 5.89 oz (167 g). The lightest OB was a 1-ball, which makes sense based on the extra abuse it takes (but this could also just be coincidence). If the heaviest CB were paired up with the lightest OB, the percentage difference would be about 8%.

FYI, I also have more info and related video demonstrations here:

Interesting data. Thank you.

I have been curious as to ball size variances compared to cloth irregularities (wear, debris on surface, minute imperfections in the slate).

Let's say the largest, or least worn OB is at 2.250" and the CB is on the cusp of being out of spec at 2.245", or even so far as 2x out of spec at 2.240", a full 0.010". When these two balls contact each other, the difference in size at center is 1/200".

Will your average/above average player notice how they play? Are there other irregularities on the surface of a well maintained table as great?

Thanks again.
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
FYI, many years ago, I took a bunch of weight measurements at a local pool hall. Here's a summary of the results from “Ball Weight and Size Difference Effects – Part I” (BD, February, 2012):

To see how much ball weight can vary in typical conditions, I took an accurate digital scale to my local pool hall (“Match Ups” in Fort Collins, Colorado). I weighed the CB and randomly selected OBs (and the 1- ball specifically) in each of eight Valley bar boxes with the assistance and permission of the owners. (Thanks Mike and Nicole!) The CB weights were fairly consistent with an average of 5.89 oz (167 g), a minimum of 5.78 oz (164 g), and a maximum of 5.93 oz (168 g). The OB weights were lighter (2-3 percent on average) and less consistent with an average of 5.75 oz (163 g), a minimum of 5.47 oz (155 g) and a maximum of 5.89 oz (167 g). The lightest OB was a 1-ball, which makes sense based on the extra abuse it takes (but this could also just be coincidence). If the heaviest CB were paired up with the lightest OB, the percentage difference would be about 8%.

FYI, I also have more info and related video demonstrations here:


Interesting data. Thank you.

I have been curious as to ball size variances compared to cloth irregularities (wear, debris on surface, minute imperfections in the slate).

Let's say the largest, or least worn OB is at 2.250" and the CB is on the cusp of being out of spec at 2.245", or even so far as 2x out of spec at 2.240", a full 0.010". When these two balls contact each other, the difference in size at center is 1/200".

Will your average/above average player notice how they play? Are there other irregularities on the surface of a well maintained table as great?

Thanks again.

I think the 8% difference in ball weights mentioned above would definitely be noticed by a good player (especially on draw shots and natural angle direction). I'm not so sure about your example numbers, but I suspect that difference would not be noticeable.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
They make a much better ball now than Hyatt did.....but Hyatt’s color codes meant something.
Blue Dot was a little heavier....for straight pool players
Red Dot drew a little better....for 9-ball players
Green Dot by Macon was the lightest....could draw table length hitting almost center ball.

Raschig raised the bar...at the ‘89 tradeshow, they were the only ball that stayed within 2 onethousandths off round, even while crossing a stripe or a number.....but the ball, like their Vitelite snooker balls, were lighter than what players wanted.

The ball I won’t buy anymore is the measle...I feel it was a failure.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
They make a much better ball now than Hyatt did.....but Hyatt’s color codes meant something.
Blue Dot was a little heavier....for straight pool players
Red Dot drew a little better....for 9-ball players
Green Dot by Macon was the lightest....could draw table length hitting almost center ball.

Raschig raised the bar...at the ‘89 tradeshow, they were the only ball that stayed within 2 onethousandths off round, even while crossing a stripe or a number.....but the ball, like their Vitelite snooker balls, were lighter than what players wanted.

The ball I won’t buy anymore is the measle...I feel it was a failure.
These are the weights of the various cue balls I have.

Screen Shot 2021-11-16 at 10.43.32 AM.png
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks to the mods for making this a sticky! I'll edit the first post in this thread with updated data as I get it.
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
The lightest OB was a 1-ball, which makes sense based on the extra abuse it takes
The one ball on our nightly ring game table eventually gave up the ghost. It shattered. It had probably had a few collisions with the cinder block wall as there were breakers that consistently hopped the cue ball to the light on the break. Of course the big cue ball out weighed it too.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Data on the main page has been updated to include Dynashperes Platinum and Bronze Sets as well as Predator Arcos II.
 

MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The sphericity gauge I've seen supported the ball on three ball bearings and had a feeler gauge that came down on the top of the ball. You moved the ball by hand and the feeler gauge would indicate the local hills/valleys.
You could use a dial indicator and simply readout the asphericity directly.
{I see that others have figured this out, too.}
 

MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What was shown in the picture above was a Dial Test Indicator (which can be made more sensitive but are extremely sensitive to COS(angle) errors). These have 0.15" movements and as good as 0.000,1 accuracies.

The related Dial Indicator is generally positioned immediately above the ball and generally have 1.000" movements and 0.001" accuracies.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Most co's would die for consistency and QC like that.
The consistency among all those various sets except for the vintage sets seems almost hard to believe.

A few years ago I purchased 10 brand new sets of Brunswick Centennials. I weighed them all on my digital (by grams) scale and if I remember correctly they varied by 2-3 grams, recorded by the nearest 1/10th of a gram.

I then rearranged the balls in all the sets - all lightest in one set, all heaviest in one set, etc. Not that myself or anyone would be able to likely tell the difference, but I guess more than anything I felt I needed to get my money’s worth out of my $200 scale purchase.
 

RobMan

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I posted this in another thread somewhere, but when I purchased a set of Aramith Tournaments a few years ago, I weighed each ball on an accurate 0.1 gram digital scale. The results are attached.
  • Average OB - 168.0 grams
  • Heaviest - 168.5
  • Lightest - 167.5
  • CB with set - 166.5
  • Measles CB - 167.9
    Capture.JPG
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
They make a much better ball now than Hyatt did.....but Hyatt’s color codes meant something.
Blue Dot was a little heavier....for straight pool players
Red Dot drew a little better....for 9-ball players
Green Dot by Macon was the lightest....could draw table length hitting almost center ball.

Raschig raised the bar...at the ‘89 tradeshow, they were the only ball that stayed within 2 onethousandths off round, even while crossing a stripe or a number.....but the ball, like their Vitelite snooker balls, were lighter than what players wanted.

The ball I won’t buy anymore is the measle...I feel it was a failure.
I bought a set of new old stock Rashig 3 years ago. I guess 30 years old or so. They were horrible. All the markings on the balls had sunken in. I was really surprised. I haven't taken them out of the box since. They will be part of my data set when I get around to making my gauge projects.
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Two different cue balls from Manning Cues
Humm, the OP weight for the Arcos II says 168, same as Saluc centennials.
But I don't see a comparative weight of Red Circle CB weight vs the herd.

Much rather pay $20-25 than $50 for One ball.
 

charley2

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Are any of the cue balls weighed in this thread considered the old double slug cue balls or the single slug cue balls? Many of us old-timers remember these on bar tables.
Thanks for presenting this data. I have argued that some of these cue balls may be close in weight but I do believe some grab the object balls more than other ones (depending on material/other) and/or maybe .5 to 2.0 grams is heavier than I realize.
 
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