Pro players still using wood shafts

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Back Hand English

Aim for a center ball shot and pivot the cue at the bridge with your back hand. Covers most soft to medium hits.
 

RDeca

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
No cue ball squirt....no shaft flexing/no give with ld's.

This allows me to ''walk up to the shot'' the same, and NOT have to allow for cue ball squirt.

The give/flexing of a maple shaft as I add more swing speed, makes me walk up and set my stance ''slightly'' different on all cut shots, along with my thought process on position play.
Ive never heard anyone say this before. And ps if Cf shafts didn't flex it would be un-playable. In archery people used to use cedar wood shafts for arrows. People switched to aluminum shafts in the 80s and carbon in the 90s. They did so because the bow progressed. (Pool is the same as it was 100 yrz ago basically.) Carbon arrows are also lighter...so you can get more speed for a flatter trajectory
I know archery is not the same as pool but. The only advantage of carbon in pool is the cheapness and speed of manufacture.

There is alot of waste in building wood shafts. Alot of culling going on. Alot of time goes into building it.
. Many people shooting recurve and longbows still prefer wood shafts. But not many use them anymore because of cost and the hassle of it all.
Many people still prefer wood shafts. Some people are lazy and dont like maintenance. Some people like the idea of a more consistent and durable product. And Some were never good enuf where switching ever affected their play anyways....so whats the difference.. Lol
 

Quesports

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
From what i've seen the benefits of CF are: dent free surface, SUPER slick finish, straight and long lasting. I've hit about four CF shafts and didn't find playability to be much different than my Mezz wood shaft. Pros get these things free so i wouldn't read to much into who uses what. Quite a few top-class players still use lumber.
Which Mezz wood shaft are you playing with? I just bought a Mezz EX Pro and like it a lot. Seems to have most of the benefits of wood and carbon fiber all in one shaft..
 

Cue Alchemist

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Deflection Ain’t So Bad As The Legendary Greats Would Attest.

On a different thread about OB’s CF shafts, I posted that I’ve been playing with original maple shafts
for six decades and switching to CF just doesn’t make any sense for someone like myself. However,
I noted that for pros and players under 40, it is probably a different proposition. 40 yrs.old was just a
random age I used. My point was there’s a point where the effort it requires to change, to improve, isn’t
worth the effort. IMO, the only advantage CF shafts have is less defection & that’s not important for me.
I do not have any issues with defection which always varies with the speed of the cue ball, the distance
it travels and the type and condition of the cloth. Defection is a strength when you learn how to master it.
Intresting topic, I agree with this above. A lot of factors come into play here. The biggest thing, is the tip you use. When your talking about getting more spin out of the ball.
I don't use CF Shafts. So I can't say it will improve my game.

Isn't it more about, how well you know how to use it? Or like bavafongoul said it more about, how well you master Deflection? If you can do that, then it doesn't really matter.
There will always be traditions in pool. Wood shafts will always be one of them.
 
Last edited:

Woodshaft

Do what works for YOU!
Has anyone done the legwork to figure out how many players that are 750 Fargo and better
Exactly half of the top 24 world fargorated use wood shafts, not including Wu Jiaqing (829) who also uses one but isn't on list atm due to not playing in any fargo tourneys recently.
And most of the fargorate-unrecognized studs in China use wood.
Predator tried to get the world's top fargorated guy, Josh Filler, to switch to a Revo and he said no ty, even after trying one for a while at a younger age. Josh's wood Z3 has served him well.
Wood playing shafts are more prevalent in the pro scene than many people think.
CF shaft breaking cues are used by many of these guys though.
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Exactly half of the top 24 world fargorated use wood shafts, not including Wu Jiaqing (829) who also uses one but isn't on list atm due to not playing in any fargo tourneys recently.
And most of the fargorate-unrecognized studs in China use wood.
Predator tried to get the world's top fargorated guy, Josh Filler, to switch to a Revo and he said no ty, even after trying one for a while at a younger age. Josh's wood Z3 has served him well.
Wood playing shafts are more prevalent in the pro scene than many people think.
CF shaft breaking cues are used by many of these guys though.
And many of the top 3c pros are still swinging trees.
 

RDeca

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The biggest benefit of wood is the ability to have it turned and tapered to your exact specs. If u have a favorite shaft. U can measure it (everything... taper. . diameter length... ferrule..material and length.. overall weight hell even grain count. give the specs to a cue maker and he can match it all pretty damn close.
 

MajorMiscue

Rock Spinner
Staff member
Moderator
Gold Member
I'm able to get ALLOT more spin transfer to the obj. ball AND waaaaaaaaay more spin on the cue ball than I ever did with the best maple shafts
I used to put the cb mid table 2 spots up from the short rail and shoot the ball straight at the opposite long rail and spin the ball into the near corner pocket to kill time waiting for the rack. If I use the same English with my cf shafts the cb hits the short rail in the center.

Must be my imagination...
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I used to put the cb mid table 2 spots up from the short rail and shoot the ball straight at the opposite long rail and spin the ball into the near corner pocket to kill time waiting for the rack. If I use the same English with my cf shafts the cb hits the short rail in the center.

Must be my imagination...
you don't get more spin with cf shaft. tip offset is what determines amount of spin. Dr.Dave's test show a slight increase with a low-deflec. shaft but its tiny. CF makes for a great shaft but it can't alter physics. UD: Dave in Fl pointed out to me i was reading it wrong. I still don't see a cf shaft spinning it more. More forward power? A tiny bit with some shafts but thats about it.
 
Last edited:

David in FL

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i don't believe that. you're saying you get no sidespin? no possible way. also, to another post, you don't get more spin with cf shaft. tip offset is what determines amount of spin. Dr.Dave's test show a slight increase with a low-deflec. shaft but its tiny.
I think he saying that he feels that he gets more side spin. You may not be visualizing the shot the way I think he means it…
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Has anyone done the legwork to figure out how many players that are 750 Fargo and better are still using wood shafts compared to say carbon fiber shafts. Post a link if you have found the research posted somewhere.
What’s stopping you from doing the research?
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I think he saying that he gets more side spin. You may not be visualizing the shot the way I think he means it…
ok. i thought he was shooting to the head rail. i got it now. either way a cf shaft doesn't spin it more. i've test played quite a few and have noticed no extra english. maybe a TAD more power but that's it.
 

Island Drive

Otto/Dads College Roommate/Cleveland Browns
Silver Member
Intresting topic, I agree with this above. A lot of factors come into play here. The biggest thing, is the tip you use. When your talking about getting more spin out of the ball.
I don't use CF Shafts. So I can't say it will improve my game.

Isn't it more about, how well you know how to use it? Or like bavafongoul said it more about, how well you master Deflection? If you can do that, then it doesn't really matter.
There will always be traditions in pool. Wood shafts will always be one of them.
I always think of it as such.
Draw shot straight in and 2' away from object ball, I'll get 4' of draw with a 4mph swing/carbon shaft/all carbons are different/somewhat I think. With maple shaft I'd probably need a 6 mph swing speed.
It's because of this thinking, I make my decision to try em.
One of em I, liked the sounds the cue made when struck properly.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
All the cf shafts i've hit have been stiffer than almost any wood shaft. I guess shafts made for 3c may be as stiff as carbon. You do seem to get a little more power in that driving the cb forward around the table is easier. Again, this difference is small but noticeable. The Revo 12.9 i tried was a powerhouse in this regard.
 
Has anyone done the legwork to figure out how many players that are 750 Fargo and better are still using wood shafts compared to say carbon fiber shafts. Post a link if you have found the research posted somewhere.
I’m not sure, but if I was a pro player over 30 years old then I probably wouldn’t switch unless there was a LOT of sponsor money incenting me to.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
I have a revo. Carbon fiber shafts far superior to wood. You don't see tennis players using wooden rackets anymore do you? The only thing I prefer wood for is masse's....not the trick shot ones...actual in the game shots.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
please not necessarily you, but anyone tell us what makes a shaft made out of a different material better than another similar one.

other than a change in what weight might work.
 

Zerksies

Well-known member
I’m one of the guys that resisted Carbon fiber for the longest time. I really feel stupid for waiting so long now.

The one thing that I’ve always hated about wood shafts are the slight changes that happen with temperature and humidity changes. It’s such a relief that I switched to CF I get none of them changes. It took me about two weeks to fully adjust to the CF shaft, but I felt the change instantaneously. It hit just like my 314-3, but I noticed less vibration on the shaft. And it’s consistent from day to day.

I always had my wood shafts glass smooth. So it’s great to have a shaft that is super smooth. No fear of dents in the shaft now either. I never used a glove and it’s a relief I don’t need one for a CF shaft. My hands don’t turn black from CF, and I don’t have any more calluses from CF. I really don’t see why people need them or use them things.

I’m hoping to have a butt someday made out of Carbon Fiber
 

phreaticus

Well-known member
The biggest benefit of wood is the ability to have it turned and tapered to your exact specs. If u have a favorite shaft. U can measure it (everything... taper. . diameter length... ferrule..material and length.. overall weight hell even grain count. give the specs to a cue maker and he can match it all pretty damn close.
There are increasing options to get fully customized CF shafts. Also, there is a wide enough selection of CF shaft designs, where one can pretty much get whatever one wants. To me, it's actually the opposite issue - the dependability & consistency of CF is the best part. Once I found a CF that I really liked, its just $400 and a few mouse clicks to get another exact mirror copy to my door in one week. In my experience, falling in love with a custom wood shaft is a painful journey, because if/once it gets dinged, damaged, etc - it can be super hard & maybe impossible to get another one with same exact feel.

I think similar to politics & religion, some folks think of shafts only as two binary camps; wood vs CF… the reality is there are all types of deflection, energy transfer, balance & feel variables among all of the different makes, models, and materials. There are super low deflection wood shafts and CF shaft with plenty of deflection... Also, some people seem able to adapt quickly to new shafts, for others changing shafts is a painful 6+ month experience.

Generally speaking, I think its always been quite hard to get a traditional maple shaft with 12.5mm diameter (or smaller) with a long pro taper to play stiff & solid. Possible, but very hard & takes really special maple & talented cue builder. CF materials & newer wood shaft building techniques (eg Keilwood, laminates, radial splices, CF cores) makes these tradeoffs much easier, and has opened up a much broader range of features & performance variables that can be designed into a cue.

Its curious to me why such pro & anti CF passion exists in the pool world; do people feel this passionate about joint materials or cue length? Are there folks out there who care & ask how many pros use steel joints vs ivory, vs phenolic? Or big pins vs small pins? Or 58, vs 59 vs 60, vs 64” extra long cues? We see huge diversity of equipment prefs among the pros, clearly there is no magical material, feature or style that rises above the rest…

I play in all sorts of locations and am a bit rough on my cues, so the biggest draw to CF for me was the fact that CF is essentially immune to dings. After trying all the major ones over a 6 mo period or so, I settled on the Cynergy 12.5. Its exactly the specs I like and to me it feels & sounds not much different than wood and plays pretty similar to a 314v2. I had essentially zero adjustment time, liked it immediately. I now have 3 of them; one with 3/8-10 on my playing cue that lives in my truck, one with 5/16-14 on my playing cue at the house and another 3/8-10 as a backup. All look/feel/sound/play identical, are in perfect like -new condition after 2 years of abuse, and I’m never without when getting a new tip etc.

For me, CF does have some drawbacks; can’t do minor masse and jump shots with it, which I normally do with any maple player. So I grab house cues and use a jump cue more than I ever did before. Also due to the very stiff CF hit, I’ve migrated to softer tips which require more maintenance and don’t last as long. I find both of those issues annoying but still prefer the overall durability/consistency advantages of the CF. Those are my pros/con tradeoffs - this same calculus may not apply for someone else.

Try new stuff, or don’t try stuff. Find something you like, according to what criteria matters most to you, and enjoy it. If you like it, no need to proselytize it to others. If you hate it, no need to demonize it to others.

Go play pool.
 
Last edited:
Top