Question: Why do People Pay to Sign up to get Slaughtered?

BigAlbert333

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Some people can actually afford the hefty entry fee and actually enjoy it "whether they have a chance or not". It's for the love of the game!

In life you have to try! You can't always be negative and think you can't. You're already setting yourself up for failure. It's something I work on myself whenever I get into a match. Believe in myself and ability. I might not always win, but atleast I tried.

I hardly to never play the Super lotto but when it reached 1 Billion dollars about 2 years ago, I had to buy a ticket each time! Why? Because I had a chance just like everybody else! The worst feeling for me would've been not buying a ticket and "wished I would've won"

Good luck to you 👍
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
OK, look at the winner side bracket at the U. S. Open. As the cops say "all the usual suspects." Dennis, Shane, Neils, Max, Jason etc. Why would inferior players, who in their hearts must know that they're no match for any of these guys, pay money and sign up to get embarrassed by these people. Even established pros like Mika, Thorsten and Cory know that they're not going to win so why do they bother to play. At the beginning of any tournament there are ten guys that can win maybe 20 at the most if Taiwan and China are fully represented as clearly they are not this year. Back in Pittsburgh I played in every C tournament there was because I always had some chance of winning. I didn't play in tournaments where A players were going to kill me and I knew it. What am I missing here?

So you think every pool tournament should be played by 20 players? Isn't the same thing happening in every game and in fact every single thing on earth one can do? There are a few hundred pro golfers and tennis players out there that are in the same exact situation, they know there is a good chance the same 10 people will be top 10 in each event, they still show up. Does the NFL do a statistical analysis of the teams and players and then cut out half the teams that don't have a chance to win the super bowl from playing the season?

There is a saying that I heard Bert Kinister use "it's better to try something and fail than do nothing and be really good at it".

For most of the lower ranked players, events like these are basically a vacation and a chance to be around and play with some of the greats of the game and to see how one would do under some pressure and an audience. The reason you did not play with the better players, some would say "no heart". I know plenty of players that are not good but they play in even race events almost every week with better players and get their ass beat and go play again next week, because they like to compete and are trying to get better. I would much rather play even with a better player than be giving up a spot to some weaker one.

One decent win against a top player can make someone's whole pool career. In fact, my son has pretty much the same story line, he was in the Ocean State and was waiting for a losers side match to catch up to him, Jayson Shaw was in that bracket. Two matches to wait, he pretty much knew that Jayson was going to be playing him in a few hours since, well, it's Jayson LOL He called me and said, it's a long wait, and I will probably have to play Jayson, maybe I should go. He did not go. He also called me back in a little bit and said "I just beat Jayson Shaw". Race to 7, 6-4 Jayson, he scratched on the break. My son ran 3 racks to knock out the #1 player in the world. Because he entered and was there waiting for the match. Since that win he has become one of the top area players and has won thousands in tournaments, and regularly goes in the top 5 in the Calcutta in every event if not the top 2. If he just looked at his rating of 580 at the time vs Jayson's 800, none of that would have happened. He is now going up to reach 630 and who knows how high that number will get.
 
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straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Open Tourney, free country...
Except for players that waste the spot. Maybe they bought in. Maybe they "earned" it through a qualifier. Their solution to professional threat seems to be hamming it. OK the pressure IS ADDED and makes people perform out of character but that's a foul of a different feather. I suggest if you have the opportunity to participate in the majors, please bring a game that is commensurate with the event.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
Some people have said there should be a qualifying process.
Seeding solves that problem.
The early rounds ARE the qualifiers...and it works just fine..
...while also leaving the possibility that an unknown could become a star...Keith Thompson comes to mind.
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Some people have said there should be a qualifying process.
Seeding solves that problem.
The early rounds ARE the qualifiers...and it works just fine..
...while also leaving the possibility that an unknown could become a star...Keith Thompson comes to mind.

They tried to make it more exclusive with higher entry fees, did not work as fully as they though it would. I think Earl or someone said all the pro events should be like a $1,000 entry and keep the events top tier. Or we need an actual pro pool tour with world wide or national rankings that are tied together so it's possible to compare the levels with progressively higher payouts in events. Not like the current mess with leagues and handicapped events that encourage cheating to keep rankings low to rob events. I mean if you play for 10,000 and can get away with being a 5 instead of a 7, to many people that is an invitation to cheat. If you are a 5 but the events you are allowed to play in pay you 1,000 instead of 10,000 as a 7 and you are really a 7, and you risk being banned because it's a national rating with no place to hide, well then you go and you play at your real skill to get that extra 9,000
 

Smutzc

Member
I'd say you can break why players turn up into a few categories for pretty much every tournament:

  1. For the experience- This type of player isn't unrealistic, they know they have no chance of winning, but they want to say they've played at a big tournament, maybe win a game or 2 and maybe even take down a big name (short race 9-Ball is one of the few sports where a decent amateur might be able to beat a pro on an off day if they get a bit of luck)
  2. Genuine contenders- As it says, they have a realistic chance to win and they know that, so they turn up
  3. To gain experience- This category of player is highly skilled, but hasn't yet achieved much, they are good in practice, but haven't been able to bring their A game to a large tournament yet
  4. Realistic expectations- This group of players know they are unlikely to win, but they also know they stand a decent chance of cashing in, this is perhaps an older pro on his way down, or a mid-level pro that has never really won anything before
  5. Delusional- This category has completely unrealistic expectations, they view their lack of success as down to bad luck, rather than poor fundamentals and/or a low skill level. They don't want to pay for a coach and will never materially improve, but they are too stubborn to accept it!
I think, given the history of the US Open and the prestige within the pool world, most probably fall into the first category (I may be way off with that, just really going on what I've seen / what people have talked about on here).
I really like this write up, I think you could add one more reason.
6. Money isn’t an issue, and a genuine true pool fan who knows they won’t make it to an elite level could pay 750$ to enter for a chance to play/meet one of their hero’s/idols.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
p.t. barnum nailed it exactly with the quote attributed to him.
"there is a sucker born every minute and two to take him"

i can see entering once as some say to experience the thrill if that means something to you.
but to regularly enter the quote is the reason.
 

Black-Balled

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I played at the last US Open in Vegas. I'm a 569, so I think I was among the bottom 10 in the field. The whole event was my favorite pool experience! From the player's meeting, to the green room, to being surrounded by spectators and idols, and playing a world champion, this was a bucket list thing that came to fruition for me.

I also did this as a learning experience. I wanted to put myself in a pressure situation in order to perform better when the spotlight wasn't so bright. I drew Albin Ouschan my first match. I could have won the first game when Albin missed, leaving me a 3 ball out. I had nerves, but when the score was 6-0, I was more settled and I did win my first (and only) game with a decent out. He beat me 11-1.

I was not embarrassed, because I knew how few chances I had. I also saw (as we're seeing in this year's tournament) lots of lopsided matches between great players. It happens with this format.

I say that you should put yourselves out there as much as possible. If you can't afford this tournament, then try others where you have a chance to play pros, but maybe the entry fee isn't as high. You won't regret it! I think it was among my best decisions and experiences.
Favorite? Seriously?!

Tell me the truth then? Where do I rank?
 

dnschmidt

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So you think every pool tournament should be played by 20 players? Isn't the same thing happening in every game and in fact every single thing on earth one can do? There are a few hundred pro golfers and tennis players out there that are in the same exact situation, they know there is a good chance the same 10 people will be top 10 in each event, they still show up. Does the NFL do a statistical analysis of the teams and players and then cut out half the teams that don't have a chance to win the super bowl from playing the season?

There is a saying that I heard Bert Kinister use "it's better to try something and fail than do nothing and be really good at it".

For most of the lower ranked players, events like these are basically a vacation and a chance to be around and play with some of the greats of the game and to see how one would do under some pressure and an audience. The reason you did not play with the better players, some would say "no heart". I know plenty of players that are not good but they play in even race events almost every week with better players and get their ass beat and go play again next week, because they like to compete and are trying to get better. I would much rather play even with a better player than be giving up a spot to some weaker one.

One decent win against a top player can make someone's whole pool career. In fact, my son has pretty much the same story line, he was in the Ocean State and was waiting for a losers side match to catch up to him, Jayson Shaw was in that bracket. Two matches to wait, he pretty much knew that Jayson was going to be playing him in a few hours since, well, it's Jayson LOL He called me and said, it's a long wait, and I will probably have to play Jayson, maybe I should go. He did not go. He also called me back in a little bit and said "I just beat Jayson Shaw". Race to 7, 6-4 Jayson, he scratched on the break. My son ran 3 racks to knock out the #1 player in the world. Because he entered and was there waiting for the match. Since that win he has become one of the top area players and has won thousands in tournaments, and regularly goes in the top 5 in the Calcutta in every event if not the top 2. If he just looked at his rating of 580 at the time vs Jayson's 800, none of that would have happened. He is now going up to reach 630 and who knows how high that number will get.
I would consider the PGA Tour to be somewhat different. If you make the cut you're going to get $10,000 not pay $1000. A middle of the road PGA tour player is driving a Lambo.
 

Positively Ralf

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Same reason I wish to play in the AMerican 14.1 Championship and US Open 14.1 Championship, to test my nerves and skills vs the best in the world. Will I win? Not a chance, but the experience alone is worth it. How do you think Saud Kantarevic must be feeling after taking down Omar in this tournament? He showed jitters near the end but the experience alone he will forever have after that win is enormous.
 

Fatboy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
OK, look at the winner side bracket at the U. S. Open. As the cops say "all the usual suspects." Dennis, Shane, Neils, Max, Jason etc. Why would inferior players, who in their hearts must know that they're no match for any of these guys, pay money and sign up to get embarrassed by these people. Even established pros like Mika, Thorsten and Cory know that they're not going to win so why do they bother to play. At the beginning of any tournament there are ten guys that can win maybe 20 at the most if Taiwan and China are fully represented as clearly they are not this year. Back in Pittsburgh I played in every C tournament there was because I always had some chance of winning. I didn't play in tournaments where A players were going to kill me and I knew it. What am I missing here?
You are aware Mika doesn’t have to pay a entry fee? Or anyone else who’s won it. Snd other players get free rolled buy private $ or sponsors.

good luck out there,
Fatboy
 

hotelyorba

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Why would inferior players, who in their hearts must know that they're no match for any of these guys, pay money and sign up to get embarrassed by these people.
Why would you think you would get embarrased? That would be only in your head, no one that understands something about pool should think you're an embarrassment if you entered a tournament like the US Open for the experience but lost 9-0 two times. And if they do think that, then that's on them.

Now, if you're delusional and greatly overestimate your Fargo 350 skill level and think you will win the whole thing, that's another matter. But people like that typically don't feel embarrassed then either. They usually have a talent for creating a narrative in their heads where they somehow come out as some kind of winner in the end, no matter what. Either that, or they find some external factor to blame for their loss.
 

hotelyorba

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You quit because you lost the tip of your finger?
Nothing else needs to be said here. SMH
I know, right?
You can always learn to stroke the cue between the knuckles of your fist, I see lots of people do that in my poolroom. Not that they are particularly successful with that, but at least they are playing.
 
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