Snakewood cracks ?

4railer

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Snakewood naturally can take on small splits or cracks . Does anyone have experience with this happening? Would a one piece snakewood handle be more likely to crack ? Is it just luck of the draw? Some of it does some doesn’t?
 

cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Snakewood is almost guaranteed to crack unless stabilized and it is hard to stabilize.
 

cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
The best way I have found to use snakewood is in slabs. Take a 5/8 square of maple and glue 3/8" snakewood slabs to two sides. Then saw the excess off the other two sides and glue two snakewood slabs to those two sides. Turn round and you have a snakewood handle that has the nice figure on all four sides. You can also use thinnner slabs and glue to four sides on a 3/4 inch piece and then router off flats on the in between 4 sides and glue those four up. That 8 sided flats of snakewood is the best looking but also double the work. I used to keep a big pickle jar 3/4 full of Nelsonite and I would drop my snakewood drilled sleeves and slabs in it for a day or so and then let it dry out. If it did not crack while drying it did not crack in the cue.
 
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4railer

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Pat Diveney and I designed a cue together. I wanted a snakewood handle . I didn’t find out till after we went over the build that snakewood can crack . If it’s just tiny cracks I guess that could be ok . I haven’t seen what the cracks actually look like when it happens.
 

Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Pat Diveney and I designed a cue together. I wanted a snakewood handle . I didn’t find out till after we went over the build that snakewood can crack . If it’s just tiny cracks I guess that could be ok . I haven’t seen what the cracks actually look like when it happens.
Funny thing about tiny cracks,
They can get bigger!
 

cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Funny thing about tiny cracks,
They can get bigger!
As soon as they are spotted they need filled with thin epoxy. Not super glue or finish. It needs epoxy to help hold it so it does not crack more. And still it is no guarantee it won't get bigger. I know you already know this, I am just responding to help others.
 

Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As soon as they are spotted they need filled with thin epoxy. Not super glue or finish. It needs epoxy to help hold it so it does not crack more. And still it is no guarantee it won't get bigger. I know you already know this, I am just responding to help others.
I know but
Consider the use of C/A in this section.
Go ahead, laugh
Cause I am!
 
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snookered_again

Well-known member
I used to keep a big pickle jar 3/4 full of Nelsonite and I would drop my snakewood drilled sleeves and slabs in it for a day or so and then let it dry out.
never heard of this stuff.. OT, Ive been working on my front steps and back railings that see full rain. used to be able to get Sikkens Cetol but it was discontinued. all I seem to be able to get is these inferior water based coatings that don't even last a year.
I soaked some of the porch posts in linseed oil and turpentine for a few days. i think it helps with rot but they tend to darken.. I can try asking at a professional wood finishing supply place.
 

Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
never heard of this stuff.. OT, Ive been working on my front steps and back railings that see full rain. used to be able to get Sikkens Cetol but it was discontinued. all I seem to be able to get is these inferior water based coatings that don't even last a year.
I soaked some of the porch posts in linseed oil and turpentine for a few days. i think it helps with rot but they tend to darken.. I can try asking at a professional wood finishing supply place.
Use caution
Nelsonite is nasty, smelly dangerous stuff.
It's no joke, Not kiddin!
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
all I seem to be able to get is these inferior water based coatings that don't even last a year.
I soaked some of the porch posts in linseed oil and turpentine for a few days. i think it helps with rot but they tend to darken.. I can try asking at a professional wood finishing supply place.

For exterior woodwork (NOT pool cues) Penofin is pretty good. Clear exterior grade. They also make some wood-tone colors like Cedar, but as you note, any oil soak finish already tends to darken the wood. Pay attention to the instructions about putting it on, letting it soak, etc, etc, but when it is done absorbing, don't leave any on the surface or it will (eventually) sort of dry to a dirt-catching waxy substance. Well soaked into the wood, it provides decent water and UV protection. It will need recoated within 6 months after first application. Then scuff sand and touch up maybe once a year for a while.

Alternative being spar varnish, which essentially takes the same regimen, but after 7 or 8 years needs stripped and re-applied.

If you are looking for rot resistance under paint, perhaps the exterior Nelsonite formulation would be better.

smt
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
I did a butt sleeve on one cue so I hope it holds up because I really like the look of it but what about this one I just saw on the net. Trouble someday?

IMG_8617.jpeg
 
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