Statement from Dennis Orcollo

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Okay the question then becomes why aren't some Europeans experiencing problems with staying in the US?
Maybe you haven't been paying attention. What happened to Dennis is at the sole discretion of the immigration/customs officer at the airport. There is no cast in stone rule, it's open to interpretation. Perhaps the Euros aren't staying here as long and coming as often as Dennis . Perhaps they are but just haven't encountered an agent enforcing a decision.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Okay the question then becomes why aren't some Europeans experiencing problems with staying in the US?
My guess is they pay closer attention to the total time they spend here or some may be getting green cards. I know Immonen and Hohmann live here a lot so they may have gotten GC's. Also some Euro's only come over for an event or two and go home. Dennis stays and plays lots of gambling matches. Its the long stays here and short one's back home that put you at risk.
 
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garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
why dont he just file dual citizenship?
The process can take forever for one. Your also now bound by two sets of laws and the possibility(likelihood) of dual taxation. There are both good/bad sides to doing it. Easier to just stay on top of your stay lengths.
 

sos911

Active member
The process can take forever for one. Your also now bound by two sets of laws and the possibility(likelihood) of dual taxation. There are both good/bad sides to doing it. Easier to just stay on top of your stay lengths.
Yeah i knew a person could become a U.S. Citizen. from what i read it could take 5yrs or so ...
 

gxman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I hope they don't browse youtube and the internet and see posters of him in action matches for 100K++. Not a good look.

But they should see him paying taxes on his U.S tournament earnings. That's a good thing.
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my heros.
Silver Member
Dilemma: Illegals crossing the border for a better life and jobs. Legals that have been here for generations and want to live off the dole (food stamps, Medicade, SSI, WIC etc.).


Deport all of them, let the one witness no criminal records get at back ofline to enter as legal as limmigrant.
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
I met my wife over six years ago in Angeles City, Philippines. It took six months for us to get her visa to come here at a cost of over $3,000. The fiancee visa was good for 90 days and we had to marry or she would be sent back. We married within one month and it took a year to get her conditional Green card, that was good for two years (two thousand dollars later). After eighteen months she applied for her "permanent" Green card which is good for ten years and is renewable over and over again for another ten years, like a passport. We have been waiting for a year and a half now and she is on "conditional" status here until she gets it. About $2,000 spent on this process. We have been told it can take 2-3 years now to get the permanent Green card. So we are in limbo, after she has been in the USA (and married to me) for four and half years. The delays are long due to the Pandemic, and we have no way of knowing how much longer it will be. All we can do is check the mailbox every day.
 

ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
Dilemma: Illegals crossing the border for a better life and jobs. Legals that have been here for generations and want to live off the dole (food stamps, Medicade, SSI, WIC etc.).

Those illegals usually either bring their family with them or get them over here later. Over a decade ago Oklahoma found that every illegal cost them over thirty dollars in social services for every hour they worked. Cheap illegal labor is only cheap for the employer and may or may not save the customer a few bucks upfront. In return we all pay on the back end.

If we really need more people over here working some jobs make it easier for people to come legally. If what is needed is subhuman workers that can be worked for less than minimum wage or in illegal conditions for the business to survive then the business needs to die. Most operations I see that are probably using illegal aliens are still charging the hell out of customers, just more profit for the businesses operating illegally.

Off topic for the thread but I see Jay posted while I was typing. Like many in the military my brother married overseas. When he brought his wife home long before 1911 it was still no cakewalk to get citizenship. I would be willing to bet that seven out of ten native Americans couldn't pass the citizenship test without extensive study themselves. I forget all of the other requirements but I do remember it wasn't just come here and go grab your papers. The process took years then, about the same as Jay is talking about now.

I can't fault Dennis for tripping over an unwritten rule of thumb that can be applied differently by every immigration agent, even different on any occasion by the same agent. I imagine a lot more people have difficulties when the agent just had a big fight with their spouse before coming to work or they are having other difficulties in their life. Field agents of every type usually exercise some discretion but being able to hammer somebody for five years maybe just because the agent is in a bad mood is ridiculous.

Hu
 

FeelDaShot

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I met my wife over six years ago in Angeles City, Philippines. It took six months for us to get her visa to come here at a cost of over $3,000. The fiancee visa was good for 90 days and we had to marry or she would be sent back. We married within one month and it took a year to get her conditional Green card, that was good for two years (two thousand dollars later). After eighteen months she applied for her "permanent" Green card which is good for ten years and is renewable over and over again for another ten years, like a passport. We have been waiting for a year and a half now and she is on "conditional" status here until she gets it. About $2,000 spent on this process. We have been told it can take 2-3 years now to get the permanent Green card. So we are in limbo, after she has been in the USA (and married to me) for four and half years. The delays are long due to the Pandemic, and we have no way of knowing how much longer it will be. All we can do is check the mailbox every day.
Wow Jay, the USCIS offices here in Cleveland move much faster, which still feels like a snail's pace.

Below is my wife's timeline. She is also from the Philippines but she was here on a J-1 visa when I met her. She came to the US in 2016 as an exchange visitor through an Au Pair program.

Marriage: 11/03/17
Green Card Issued (Conditional - 2 YR): 5/10/18
Green Card Issued (Permanent - 10 YR): 1/20/21
Naturalization/Citizenship Issued: 06/03/21

Now we're working on my mother-in-law's green card. Feel free to reach out if you ever need help with the process. I'm quite seasoned at this point.
 
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