STRONGEST FIELD so far this year-Las Vegas Open (1-4 Sep), 10 Ball/9 ft table, Winner $15K

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The absolute best part about this event, IMO, that I have NEVER, EVER, EVER seen in pool before, is all the matches are starting to the second on time. That has got to be one of the most frustrating thing about being a pool fan. Nothing EVER starts on time. Thank you CSI for bucking the trend!!!
 

sjm

Older and Wiser
Silver Member
The absolute best part about this event, IMO, that I have NEVER, EVER, EVER seen in pool before, is all the matches are starting to the second on time. That has got to be one of the most frustrating thing about being a pool fan. Nothing EVER starts on time. Thank you CSI for bucking the trend!!!
The Turning Stone Classic also adheres extremely well to the published match schedule.
 

sjm

Older and Wiser
Silver Member
Congratulations to Wu Kun Lin and to all who were successful at this event, but seriously, this format forces every player to go to battle with a cheap suit of armor. If all one has to do to beat someone is split races to four and then prevail in a shootout, then the better player's edge is way too small.

The first time I saw a spot shot tiebreaker in pool was at Darren Appleton's World Pool Series in 2017, but the races were long and the tiebreaker was only used when matches went double hill. There weren't many tiebreakers, but the few they had were exciting, as the cue ball had five different positions from which to pocket a ball on the spot and a couple of them were super-tough. Tiebreakers, more often than not, were over in five shots.

The format used at the Las Vegas 10-ball event ensured that countless matches were decided by spot shots, and that's not how matches should be decided at this level. While such a format remains a test of skill rather than luck, I'm giving a big thumbs down to this format.

I'll give CSI some credit for trying something new, but this format is terrible. I guess I'll have to ask around a bit, but I'd be hard pressed to believe that this format finds favor with either the pro players or with the fans, although it's probably a big hit with dead money players. Speaking as a fan, I'll do what I can to steer clear of attending any events utilizing this format.
 

BeiberLvr

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't know if this would be considered a Major event. It surely had enough good players.

Let's say it was a major event.

Does anyone know how often the finals of a major had BOTH players that were outside of the top 50 in FR? Looks like Wu was 52 and Omar was 71.
 

sjm

Older and Wiser
Silver Member
I don't know if this would be considered a Major event. It surely had enough good players.

Let's say it was a major event.

Does anyone know how often the finals of a major had BOTH players that were outside of the top 50 in FR? Looks like Wu was 52 and Omar was 71.
It's most definitely not even close to being a major, but it's field was elite due to it's being a prep for the World 10-ball. Fargo Ratings have only been around in recent years, so this question can be a bit misleading.

Still, I don't think it's terribly rare that two players outside the top 50, or even the top 100 in the world meet in the final of a significant event. I found it far more shocking that two players outside the top 50 by Fargo medaled in the 2021 World Pool Championships (Szolnoki, Al-Shaheen).

Still as you suggest, this is fairly rare and it is, indeed, noteworthy.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As a fan, I liked the format. To me it was exciting and held my attention. I don’t think it led to more upsets than a standard race to 8 format.

The only thing I didn’t like about the spot shot was it took too long to set up. The ref would not touch the cb until it stopped, then he’d clean both balls, then spot them. If that whole process would take 1/3rd of the time it would be the appropriate speed, imo.
 

JAM

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This is, by far, the best pool extravaganza I've seen in a long time, mixing leagues with pros and juniors a la Super Billiards Expo style.

I think CSI should be praised for putting on a first-class—no—world-class event. Many of the pros were at the recent Texas tournament at Skinny Bob's, so it was a hop, skip, and a jump to go to Vegas. Good timing by CSI!

I did not like this format, however, for the pro event, but that's just me. I loved seeing pool's super stars at the pro event, though. Good stuff!

Congrats to Wu and Omar, two great warriors! I wonder what Matchroom's U.S. Open will bring. Omar is rising to the top quite often. It just might be his turn to snatch the almighty win in Atlantic City. Time will tell.

Good shooting, Wu-Wu!
 
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iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’m surprised there were so many ways to shoot the spot shot. Also surprised Shane and a couple others hit it low and played the cb sharp around the cornets.

If anyone remembers Russian Kenny, he would probably bet he can make 30 of these in a row, and he’d win. He rolls the ball.
 

JAM

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’m surprised there were so many ways to shoot the spot shot. Also surprised Shane and a couple others hit it low and played the cb sharp around the cornets.

If anyone remembers Russian Kenny, he would probably bet he can make 30 of these in a row, and he’d win. He rolls the ball.
Reminds me of Mr. Spot Shot, Kenny Kiddy, who grew up in rural Maryland. Mr. Spot Shot shot 1,250 spot shots in a row

 

skogstokig

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i agree on the format being weird. however, given the pandemic absence of ~1.5 year i'm not sure wu kun's fargorate is accurate. maybe the guy have been in an 1.5 year boot camp with the ko brothers, kevin cheng, JL chang and the other monsters of formosa. we don't know. he sure didn't miss much.
 

Joe_Jaguar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As a fan, I liked the format. To me it was exciting and held my attention. I don’t think it led to more upsets than a standard race to 8 format.

The only thing I didn’t like about the spot shot was it took too long to set up. The ref would not touch the cb until it stopped, then he’d clean both balls, then spot them. If that whole process would take 1/3rd of the time it would be the appropriate speed, imo.
There was no reason at all for Leyhman to be slowing it down by going to retrieve the cueball every time. Just dumb. If the players wanted to wipe it off they could. He likes to be a little too much of the show.
 

mattydrva

New member
Embarrassingly bad format in every possible way. Pool in USA needs a "Pro Tour" so was excited to see this series unveiled when announced though now resigned to chalking this up to yet another disappointment for the game. It sometimes feels like there is a cosmic force out there working against professional pool. Predator could not have come up with a worse format. Sad. #poolworld Haha
 

AtLarge

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... The format used at the Las Vegas 10-ball event ensured that countless matches were decided by spot shots, and that's not how matches should be decided at this level. While such a format remains a test of skill rather than luck, I'm giving a big thumbs down to this format. ...
I agree, Stu. It's possible (not likely) for a player to win a match under that format by losing 7 of 11 games and making 1 spot shot in 4 tries. And I dislike settling any game-based pool match with the somewhat different skill of shooting spot shots, even with the better format used in the Appleton events.
 
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JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
How would you like to hit some 14 spot shots and lose? 10 were from the first diamond iirc. Poor CJ Lin .
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i agree on the format being weird. however, given the pandemic absence of ~1.5 year i'm not sure wu kun's fargorate is accurate. maybe the guy have been in an 1.5 year boot camp with the ko brothers, kevin cheng, JL chang and the other monsters of formosa. we don't know. he sure didn't miss much.
Agree. The dude shoots as straight as Filler and Shaw and has simple patterns .
 

spartan

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't know if this would be considered a Major event. It surely had enough good players.

Let's say it was a major event.

Does anyone know how often the finals of a major had BOTH players that were outside of the top 50 in FR? Looks like Wu was 52 and Omar was 71.
Interesting question.
This event is not a major though it has killer field.
The notable "fluke" winners of majors in past few decades were Daryl Peach (W9B) , Yukio (W9B), Huidji See (W10B). There was no Fargo years ago, so they could be outside top 50 WPA ranking then. Their opponents in final were Roberto Gomez, Alcano and Fu Jian Bo respectively. Alcano and Fu Jian Bo definitely in top 50 in those days. Roberto Gomez was relative unknown more than 10 years ago- I think he was a journalist and playing pool part time and below players like De Luna, Gandy Valle.
So that Daryl Peach v Roberto Gomez W9B final could be candidate for major finalists outside top 50 :LOL:
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
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.... The format used at the Las Vegas 10-ball event ensured that countless matches were decided by spot shots, and that's not how matches should be decided at this level. ...
Exactly. Between equal players, there is a 50% chance of a shootout. With a difference of 70 rating points that drops to 38%. That means you could expect something like 40% of all the matches to end in a shootout and likely a higher percentage towards the end.

I don't like it.
 
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