Suggestions for Dymondwood turning?

Tommy-D

World's best B player...
Silver Member
> I have a 40" rod of the cocobolo Dymondwood that I plan on cutting down to a small enough diameter to make joint protectors out of. I have only used my small Enco machine to turn down a set that was already made but oversized,so I have NO experience taking a cut on it in a full-sized machine. Any input as far as a feed/speed for it? Depth of cut?

The rod has rough,frayed ends,like a broken broomhandle,so I'll have to cut the end off with a bandsaw,then face and center drill. Without a rear chuck,will the rod flop around in the spindle if I turn it at say 80 RPM to face and center drill? The rod is currently 1.066,my intended diameter is .875,I can finish turn and tap them in my Enco from there.

Live tooling or a saw machine is not an option.

The machine is a 14x40 Grizzly toolroom lathe,very much like the one Joe from Cue Components has,minus the QC toolpost and rear chuck. This machine was bought by the school I attend less than a year ago. I have access to HSS,cemented carbide,and indexable carbide single-point tooling. Will a wide radius work better in this case than "sharp" tooling?

I'll be turning this rod out of the chuck using a live center on the other end,as opposed to totally between centers,I HATE the idea of using a "dog".

I'm asking this because the rod was purchased by a friend,on the condition that we split whatever I make off selling these,so wasting the material I have is NOT an option. I'm aware that I'll use up some length using a bandsaw or part-off tool cutting it to length for joint protectors,I just don't want to ruin it before I get to that point. Thanks in advance,Tommy D.
 

RocketQ

It's Not Rocket Science
Silver Member
Chuck it up tight and spin it 500 face center drill move it out 6" or whatever rest on live center and turn. A good sharp tool radius on high speed is good enough. If you are worried about it flopping around make a bushing out of wood or whatever laying around to fit the back of the headstock and the od of the wood.
 

Jon

Custom User Title
Silver Member
Another option is to just cut it to smaller lengths.
They would be easier to manage, as you wouldn't have to worry about anything flopping around.
After center drilling, just chuck up on one end, live center in the other and turn it down as close to the chuck as you feel comfortable with, then flip it around and clean it up without moving your tool.
Lather, rinse, repeat and you're done.
 

JoeyInCali

Maker of Joey Bautista Cues
Silver Member
Saw it in half, 20 inches.
Make a nylon bushing that fits the ID of your spindle ( a hair under ) bore a 1 inch hole. Take it to a bandsaw and cut one slit so the thing can expand.
Then machine.
 

chuckpilegis

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
A piece of coco dymondwood 28 inches long is only like 11 bucks at Atlas so I wouldnt worry too much about wasting it
Here are some I made on my mini-lathe
shaftclamp004.jpg
 

rhncue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
chuckpilegis said:
A piece of coco dymondwood 28 inches long is only like 11 bucks at Atlas so I wouldnt worry too much about wasting it
Here are some I made on my mini-lathe
shaftclamp004.jpg

I was going to say that I bought some 1 inch Pacawood one time that is very similar to Diamondwood. I called the company and got cut offs that were different lengths up to around 4 foot for 2.00 a foot. They had a large number of different types including Cocobolo.

Dick
 
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