Veneers or Recut? You like one better?

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
Recuts just don't get me going like veneers, anyone else have a opinion?

it depends.....i like them both......imop recuts would be the stronger structurally , which actually isn't an opinion lol...if done correctly a recut would def be stronger and more structurally sound.
 

Texas Carom Club

play 1cushion & balkline
Silver Member
both

I like em both as well but I've only got a veneered one atm
 

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slide13

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Recuts are cool for how they're done, but they rarely look as good to me. I like classic veneered points the best.

Though I've seen some pretty sweet recut Sugartrees, so that is one I wouldn't mind having!
 

slide13

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
could someone explain the difference please?

Veneers are thin pieces of wood, usually dyed a color, that are stacked around the point wood stock before being placed into the forearm.

Recut points are standard points that are put into the forearm, then another point groove cut into that first point wood and another point done within the first point. Can be repeated multiple times. With recuts you usually have solid wood bordering solid wood, there is no seam like there is with veneers at the tip of the point where the two sides meet.
 

deanoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I like the looks of the traditional cues.Points like Barry,Gus,George,Scruggs,White and South west use

I realize south west are different slightly,The others are mitered and I forget the name for how Jerry and Laurie use.

I seldom buy a recut,some people make 8 point cues with veneers that feature recut and mitered
veneers

i do like the looks of sharp points,and veneers,any technique that produces this is my personal favorite

Jerry Rauenzahn makes the 8 point,sharp ,with veneers and recut points that look great to me

just my preference

I have never seen the Searing new work,but I think they are recut not mitered veneers,although
I am not sure
 
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Chopdoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If I have to choose it will be veneers. But I don't necessarily dislike recuts.

Also, the two techniques can be combined.



.
 

Wedge

WO Wedge Lock
Silver Member
My Corey Barnhart with recut points

Example of a recut point cue.
 

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Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Veneers or recut points......Hmn.......full splice or partial spice.......Hmn again.......

Wrap or wrapless.......Anuda Hmn........Joint type.......never mind, too many choices.

My point is there are so many alternatives & options that I prefer to just go by what I see n' like.



Matt B.
 

franko

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Love

While I love the look of well done veneers and have cues with them, I am a disciple of Tony Scianella and Black Boar cues. Tony does not do veneers and says he does not like to even call his recuts because some will mistake that for a veneer. He says he deep cuts several points in and feels this actually adds to the structure of the cue.
I had just purchased a 6 pointer at SBE and took it to show Tony saying " I just picked up one of your 6 pointers " and that is when he explained it, saying in reality the cue actually had 12 points.
 

TATE

AzB Gold Mensch
Gold Member
Silver Member
I dont think I'd call those recuts - doesn't fit the definition

They looks like recuts to me, no miters visible.

In my opinion, recuts are more difficult to do on a milling machine than putting together traditional veneers. They require extreme accuracy and a very stable machine to get uniform thickness, when showing the same width as veneers. Theoretically they will be stronger and less prone to lifting and separation in the long haul.
 
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Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Recuts just don't get me going like veneers, anyone else have a opinion?

All 4 disciplines of veneering in cues gets me excited.
1-Overlapped veneers
2-mitered veneers
3-Milled veneers
4-Actual re-cut points.
The percentage of people who actually understand the difference is the funny part.
People understand overlapped veneers and mitered veneers very well. But can't seem to grasp the difference between a milled veneer done outside the forearm and then put together and glued all at once in the channel's.
Then RE-CUT..........?
Example.
Cut 4 vee channel's and install 4 points. After drying. Turn the excess off. Re-index and re-cut the channel in the points until your desired thickness off wall is left. Repeat etc.etc.etc.
Simple isn't it. lol
 

jasonlaus

Rep for Smorg
Silver Member
They looks like recuts to me, no miters visible.

In my opinion, recuts are more difficult to do on a milling machine than putting together traditional veneers. They require extreme accuracy and a very stable machine to get uniform thickness, when showing the same width as veneers. Theoretically they will be stronger and less prone to lifting and separation in the long haul.

They are not recuts, just a different way of doing things.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
These are recuts, an old cue I hate I had to sell
I don't think recuts are done with veneer

Veneers are thin pieces of wood, usually dyed a color, that are stacked around the point wood stock before being placed into the forearm.

Recut points are standard points that are put into the forearm, then another point groove cut into that first point wood and another point done within the first point. Can be repeated multiple times. With recuts you usually have solid wood bordering solid wood, there is no seam like there is with veneers at the tip of the point where the two sides meet.

recuts can and are made with dyed woods though....go check out the searing i took the video of......its quartersawn sycamore so you can see the "quilting" on the edges.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIrBPdb1d2k&ab_channel=GreyghostPool

thanks guys for answering my question
 

Double-Dave

Developing cue-addict
Silver Member
Recuts just don't get me going like veneers, anyone else have a opinion?

For me it depends on the cue. For example, a classic maple forearm cue with ebony points
I prefer some nice veneers. From what I have seen most makers who do stacked veneers
seem to pull these off a little better then the mitered veneers but I don't really have a preference
there (mitered vs. stacked) as long as they are both tight and well done.

On a dark forearmed cue with dark points however I really like a recut of, for example, some high
figure curly maple, you just don't get that type of figuring on a regular veneer.

gr. Dave
 

skins

Likes to draw
Silver Member
They looks like recuts to me, no miters visible.

In my opinion, recuts are more difficult to do on a milling machine than putting together traditional veneers. They require extreme accuracy and a very stable machine to get uniform thickness, when showing the same width as veneers. Theoretically they will be stronger and less prone to lifting and separation in the long haul.

They're not recuts.... They're veneers, albeit a different technique, requiring every bit of that "extreme accuracy" and more, to pull off.
 
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