Veneers or Recut? You like one better?

TATE

AzB Gold Mensch
Gold Member
Silver Member
They're not recuts.... They're veneers, albeit a different technique, requiring every bit of that "extreme accuracy" and more, to pull off.

Interesting. I don't think I've ever seen veneers without joints like that.
 

SUPERSTAR

I am Keyser Söze
Silver Member
I like my recuts better.
 

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jasonlaus

Rep for Smorg
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They're not recuts.... They're veneers, albeit a different technique, requiring every bit of that "extreme accuracy" and more, to pull off.

Thanks for the backup on this.


They "look" like recuts, but they are not.
Jason
 

9Ballr

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I prefer the look of veneers and will usually order that.
Typically don't like the outlines on recuts, although there are always exceptions.
 

Wedge

WO Wedge Lock
Silver Member
Twin Point Interrupted Cues

Not sure what you call these points on my McWorter Cues.

Sorry about the crappy pic's taken with my cell phone after a couple cups of coffee.

Wedge
 

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john coloccia

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Greyghost did not answer your question correctly.....although I can see why somebody would think that.

You can actually see a very faint seam in the sycamore (I'm assuming sycamore) right at the 2:00 mark in the video. Maybe he meant that the longest point was recut and then inlaid with a veneered stack. No reason you can't do it like that. I guess someone would have to ask Dennis how he built it.
 

jasonlaus

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You can actually see a very faint seam in the sycamore (I'm assuming sycamore) right at the 2:00 mark in the video. Maybe he meant that the longest point was recut and then inlaid with a veneered stack. No reason you can't do it like that. I guess someone would have to ask Dennis how he built it.

There is no seam, and they are not recut.

Edit: I know how he did it and am assuming Skins does also since Im pretty sure they talk.
 

john coloccia

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There is no seam, and they are not recut.

Edit: I know how he did it and am assuming Skins does also since Im pretty sure they talk.

Its not? I'll certainly take your word for it. It just looks like the sycamore has a seam, but it's always hard to tell just from a camera shot.

Is it some secret technique?
 

skins

Likes to draw
Silver Member
Not sure what you call these points on my McWorter Cues.

Sorry about the crappy pic's taken with my cell phone after a couple cups of coffee.

Wedge

Jerry calls them "Points Interupted" if im not mistaken...
 

ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
A few thoughts: First, there is no margin for error on points or recuts, you get them right or start over. Veneers can serve as filler with some slight give to them to hide less than perfect fit between the major pieces. Also, veneers are usually made of sycamore, a very soft wood. This is probably immaterial as I think they usually end up completely saturated with glue anyway, still, something to think about. Veneers look good but they can hide tiny errors.

From a practical standpoint it probably doesn't matter in the least in a completed cue. Having been a micro-machinist working to dimensions that had to be gauged, they couldn't be measured with normal instruments, the recuts have more appeal to me.

While they can be a bit of a crutch, veneers don't have to be. Some of the best in the business use them. They could weaken a cue and dull the hit slightly, they don't weaken it to a point that matters and when soaked with glue may actually strengthen a cue.

Recuts for me, the builder matters more than if they use recuts or veneers though.

Hu
 

Quesports

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
A few thoughts: First, there is no margin for error on points or recuts, you get them right or start over. Veneers can serve as filler with some slight give to them to hide less than perfect fit between the major pieces. Also, veneers are usually made of sycamore, a very soft wood. This is probably immaterial as I think they usually end up completely saturated with glue anyway, still, something to think about. Veneers look good but they can hide tiny errors.

From a practical standpoint it probably doesn't matter in the least in a completed cue. Having been a micro-machinist working to dimensions that had to be gauged, they couldn't be measured with normal instruments, the recuts have more appeal to me.

While they can be a bit of a crutch, veneers don't have to be. Some of the best in the business use them. They could weaken a cue and dull the hit slightly, they don't weaken it to a point that matters and when soaked with glue may actually strengthen a cue.

Recuts for me, the builder matters more than if they use recuts or veneers though.

Hu
I owned a beautiful Skip Weston it was one of the cues he displayed on his webpage. The milled hardwood veneers were stunning. What technique did he use on his cues?? I have always been curious about this, there was no seam at the tip of his veneers...
 

cubswin

Just call me Joe...
Silver Member
I like whatever Mike Webb does when he sends me pictures of his recent builds. Of course he does it because he knows I want one, and he isn't taking orders.
 
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