Very honest 23-minute video interview w/ John Schmidt about the 626 run and career

arnaldo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Very honest 23-minute video interview w/ John Schmidt about the 626 run and his career.
And on the same page, some Q&A text about his training and mental approach to the game.

There are 2 or 3 vids about John on this webpage; (scroll to the very bottom of the page for a montage of clips from one his attempts at Mosconi's record).

https://www.sportskeeda.com/basebal...eaking-willie-mosconi-s-billiards-record-more

I don't recall seeing this webpage posted here before on AZB. In any case it will be of interest to some folks. I like John's very sincere side as conveyed in the text page and especially in the 23-minute interview. In that interview he's able to laugh at his audacious bets against seemingly far better money players quite early in his road player days.

Enjoy.

Arnaldo
 

u12armresl

One Pocket back cutter
Silver Member
I might be in the minority here, but I'm beginning to question if it should be recognized as a legit run and in the Guinness book.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I might be in the minority here, but I'm beginning to question if it should be recognized as a legit run and in the Guinness book.
The Guinness Book is not the authority responsible for this particular record.
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I might be in the minority here, but I'm beginning to question if it should be recognized as a legit run and in the Guinness book.


From what I've read to date JS did not take the requisite steps necessary to make any of his run attempts qualify as a Guinness record.

Lou Figueroa
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Yeah, right, Guinness pool records....

Longest duration balancing a pool cue on one finger
The longest duration balancing a pool cue on one finger is 4 hr 20 min and was achieved by David…

Greatest distance travelled with cue balanced on a finger
The greatest distance travelled with cue balanced on a finger is 32.4 km (20.13 mi) and was achieved…

Fastest 100 m balancing a pool cue on finger
The fastest 100 m balancing a pool cue on a finger is 16.02 sec and was achieved by David Rush (USA)…

Greatest distance travelled with a pool cue balanced on chin
The greatest distance travelled with a pool cue balanced on the chin is 3,300 m (10,826 ft 9 in),…
And Guinness does not recognize Willie Mosconi's 526. Florian Kohler seems to have more pool records than anyone, including:

The fastest time to jump pot 15 balls on a US table one-handed is 12.16 sec, and was achieved by Florian Kohler (France) in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, on 16 December 2018.
 
Last edited:

PoolPlayer4

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yeah, right, Guinness pool records....

Longest duration balancing a pool cue on one finger
The longest duration balancing a pool cue on one finger is 4 hr 20 min and was achieved by David…

Greatest distance travelled with cue balanced on a finger
The greatest distance travelled with cue balanced on a finger is 32.4 km (20.13 mi) and was achieved…

Fastest 100 m balancing a pool cue on finger
The fastest 100 m balancing a pool cue on a finger is 16.02 sec and was achieved by David Rush (USA)…

Greatest distance travelled with a pool cue balanced on chin
The greatest distance travelled with a pool cue balanced on the chin is 3,300 m (10,826 ft 9 in),…
And Guinness does not recognize Willie Mosconi's 526. Florian Kohler seems to have more pool records than anyone, including:

The fastest time to jump pot 15 balls on a US table one-handed is 12.16 sec, and was achieved by Florian Kohler (France) in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, on 16 December 2018.
I'm stunned that Guinness wasn't listed in Pool's Power 15!

It was probably a close call between them and Florian "Venom" Kohler, what with all the pros players now devoting most of their practice time on behind the back jump shots to spin the cue ball around the hot chicks in the audience.
 

jimmyg

Mook! What's a Mook?
Silver Member
I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the the public....with the exception of the one "claimed" by JS.
 

arnaldo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the public....with the exception of the one "claimed" by JS.
Logically that means you can recall seeing film/video of Mosconi's performance of his world record 526-ball run, and that the film/video is in fact -- readily available for view by the public.

I'd love to view it. Please post details for doing so. What Straight Pool fan wouldn't want to buy a copy of that.

Arnaldo
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Logically that means you can recall seeing film/video of Mosconi's performance of his world record 526-ball run, and that the film/video is in fact -- readily available for view by the public.

I'd love to view it. Please post details for doing so. What Straight Pool fan wouldn't want to buy a copy of that.

Arnaldo


It's not nice to torture logic like that, lol.

Lou Figueroa
logic will come back
and bite you in the butt
 

jimmyg

Mook! What's a Mook?
Silver Member
Originally Posted by jimmyg View Post
I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the public....with the exception of the one "claimed" by JS.

Logically that means you can recall seeing film/video of Mosconi's performance of his world record 526-ball run, and that the film/video is in fact -- readily available for view by the public.

I'd love to view it. Please post details for doing so. What Straight Pool fan wouldn't want to buy a copy of that.

Arnaldo

Did those 1954 cell phones have built-in video cameras? Went to one of his exhibitions, much later, don't recall it being filmed either?

I thought that was pretty obvious.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Did those 1954 cell phones have built-in video cameras? Went to one of his exhibitions, much later, don't recall it being filmed either? ...
What you said earlier was:

I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the the public...

I think I see where there may have been some confusion. The earliest motion pictures were done about 1877 by Eadweard Muybridge:

Muybridge’s experiments in photographing motion began in 1872, when the railroad magnate Leland Stanford hired him to prove that during a particular moment in a trotting horse’s gait, all four legs are off the ground simultaneously. His first efforts were unsuccessful because his camera lacked a fast shutter. The project was then interrupted while Muybridge was being tried for the murder of his wife’s lover. Although he was acquitted, he found it expedient to travel for a number of years in Mexico and Central America ...

Ead's method was flawed by needing one camera per frame. A little later in 1888 William Kennedy Laurie Dickson, working in the West Orange, New Jersey, laboratories of the Edison Company, created what was widely regarded as the first motion-picture camera, which used a roll of film. (Various parts stolen from various sources.)

Bob <-- I told Tommy that he really had something, but he was slow to market it. Poor business sense.
 

jimmyg

Mook! What's a Mook?
Silver Member
What you said earlier was:

I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the the public...

I think I see where there may have been some confusion. The earliest motion pictures were done about 1877 by Eadweard Muybridge:

Muybridge’s experiments in photographing motion began in 1872, when the railroad magnate Leland Stanford hired him to prove that during a particular moment in a trotting horse’s gait, all four legs are off the ground simultaneously. His first efforts were unsuccessful because his camera lacked a fast shutter. The project was then interrupted while Muybridge was being tried for the murder of his wife’s lover. Although he was acquitted, he found it expedient to travel for a number of years in Mexico and Central America ...

Ead's method was flawed by needing one camera per frame. A little later in 1888 William Kennedy Laurie Dickson, working in the West Orange, New Jersey, laboratories of the Edison Company, created what was widely regarded as the first motion-picture camera, which used a roll of film. (Various parts stolen from various sources.)

Bob <-- I told Tommy that he really had something, but he was slow to market it. Poor business sense.

Point I was trying to make, Bob, was Mosconi's run was not filmed, JS's was. Still think that it was pretty clear.

Perhaps I should have said "when most everyone had filming capabilities".
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
Did those 1954 cell phones have built-in video cameras? Went to one of his exhibitions, much later, don't recall it being filmed either?

I thought that was pretty obvious.

It IS extraordinary that in fact, there’s a record on film, and the world can’t see it.
My interest is fading also.
 

arnaldo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Did those 1954 cell phones have built-in video cameras? Went to one of his exhibitions, much later, don't recall it being filmed either?

I thought that was pretty obvious.
Lame, Jimmy.
What is obvious to all, is that with this qualifier (red-fonted) you chose for emphasis:
-------------------------------------------------------------------
"I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the public....with the exception of the one "claimed" by JS."
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. . . you actually de-emphasize the comparison you intended, once a similar record (Mosconi's) "achieved after film was invented" is pointed out. That qualifier insertion seems like a silly way to argue that John needs to make his hypothetical world- record-shattering performance readily available (a premise I agree with and an action that would be appropriate and is long overdue).

Heck, we all know that even if/when the 626 video is released there will be more than 626 reasons given by some viewers why it is or isn't valid evidence of the actual performance.

Arnaldo
 

jimmyg

Mook! What's a Mook?
Silver Member
Originally Posted by jimmyg View Post
Did those 1954 cell phones have built-in video cameras? Went to one of his exhibitions, much later, don't recall it being filmed either?

I thought that was pretty obvious.

It IS extraordinary that in fact, there’s a record on film, and the world can’t see it.
My interest is fading also.

Welcome to Rhetorical Debate Class 101: :wink:

It is, indeed, extraordinary...It is also a tell of sorts, either of the run itself or of the person. Not seeing the video, or knowing the person, I don't know which, or what.

Back to class, not that you need one. Notice how the topic of conversation was magically switched from JS's videotaped run not being available for public viewing to Willie Mosconi's run which isn't available for public viewing but wasn't even recorded ...Damn charlatan that Mosconi.
 

jimmyg

Mook! What's a Mook?
Silver Member
Lame, Jimmy.
What is obvious to all, is that with this qualifier (red-fonted) you chose for emphasis:
-------------------------------------------------------------------
"I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the public....with the exception of the one "claimed" by JS."
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. . . you actually de-emphasize the comparison you intended, once a similar record (Mosconi's) "achieved after film was invented" is pointed out. That qualifier insertion seems like a silly way to argue that John needs to make his hypothetical world- record-shattering performance readily available (a premise I agree with and an action that would be appropriate and is long overdue).

Heck, we all know that even if/when the 626 video is released there will be more than 626 reasons given by some viewers why it is or isn't valid evidence of the actual performance.

Arnaldo

I've already acknowledged that I could have been clearer, I didn't think that anyone would not understand my point or decide to create issue.

Point I was trying to make, Bob, was Mosconi's run was not filmed, JS's was. Still think that it was pretty clear.

Perhaps I should have said "when most everyone had filming capabilities".
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Lame, Jimmy.
What is obvious to all, is that with this qualifier (red-fonted) you chose for emphasis:
-------------------------------------------------------------------
"I cannot recall a sports world record achieved after film was invented that is not readily available for view by the public....with the exception of the one "claimed" by JS."
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. . . you actually de-emphasize the comparison you intended, once a similar record (Mosconi's) "achieved after film was invented" is pointed out. That qualifier insertion seems like a silly way to argue that John needs to make his hypothetical world- record-shattering performance readily available (a premise I agree with and an action that would be appropriate and is long overdue).

Heck, we all know that even if/when the 626 video is released there will be more than 626 reasons given by some viewers why it is or isn't valid evidence of the actual performance.

Arnaldo


There's a reason there's no Mosconi run video available.

Video equipment 1950's vs today.

Lou Figueroa
 

Attachments

  • Unknown.jpeg
    Unknown.jpeg
    9.4 KB · Views: 253
  • Unknown-1.jpeg
    Unknown-1.jpeg
    3.8 KB · Views: 240
Top