what do you cut a one piece with?

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
I have a metal cutting band saw that can drop down and cut a 57 inch cue in half. But cutting a one piece cue in the middle on a normal band saw does not compute to me. I cut 30 inch shafts in half on my 16 inch band saw to make coring dowels, but not sure how to reach that middle point on a wood cutting band saw like most cuemakers own.
Think outside of the box. Most full length cues you are only cutting the save the butt or on rare occasion the shaft.
Most of the time the shaft is so warped it's kindling for the individuals living in a cold winter state.
If you are trying to save both halves (which I'm not sure why) just cut on an angle. Face both halves off.
Takes 5 seconds to whack one in half.
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
It is pretty straight forward if the shaft is straight, and you are just making a true sneaky pete.

Part the cue in half. Face it off. Drill and bore the hole for the pin. Set the pin.
Face off the shaft. Drill and bore for treading or an insert depending on your pin.
Done.

Adding a joint collar just adds that step.

If the shaft is no good, then just the steps for the butt and then screw on a shaft.

IMG_9486.jpeg


IMG_5309.jpeg


IMG_5396.png
 
Last edited:

DeeDeeCues

Well-known member
Think outside of the box. Most full length cues you are only cutting the save the butt or on rare occasion the shaft.
Most of the time the shaft is so warped it's kindling for the individuals living in a cold winter state.
If you are trying to save both halves (which I'm not sure why) just cut on an angle. Face both halves off.
Takes 5 seconds to whack one in half.

100%.
 

jtrujillo707

Registered
I think maybe he thought of the obvious and maybe thought, it can't be that easy.

20 years ago I asked a cue maker friend about getting weight bolts to size. I thought it was probably done on a lathe which I was new to. He said, cut it with a hack saw.

The upside to stupid questions is they usually end up being someone's entertainment.
This

Thanks everyone for the helpful responses. I know that I can just cut it. I didn't know if there was a "standard" way that it was done. You don't know what you don't know, you know? lol.

I know I can learn by doing, but I can also learn by asking knowledgeable people. Thank you guys.
 

jtrujillo707

Registered
Think outside of the box. Most full length cues you are only cutting the save the butt or on rare occasion the shaft.
Most of the time the shaft is so warped it's kindling for the individuals living in a cold winter state.
If you are trying to save both halves (which I'm not sure why) just cut on an angle. Face both halves off.
Takes 5 seconds to whack one in half.
The reason i am/was trying to save the shaft is because it's still straight after banging around at a pool hall for at least 10 years. It seems like at this point it ain't warping, no?
 

GBCues

Damn, still .002 TIR!
Gold Member
Silver Member
Well, a detail that no one has mentioned is this:
Because the whole cue is tapered, once you cut it into 2 pieces, the diameters of the front and back (or top and bottom if you prefer) will no longer mate up. Inserting a collar, or collars, kind of defeats the whole "Sneaky Pete" concept of having a two-piece cue that looks like a one-piece bar cue.
There are a couple of ways of fixing that, but suddenly your "easy peasy" Sneaky from a one-piece bar cue is not so easy.
YMMV
Gary
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
The reason i am/was trying to save the shaft is because it's still straight after banging around at a pool hall for at least 10 years. It seems like at this point it ain't warping, no?
So now you are tied to the taper that is on the one pc shaft? Isn't that a big part of the reason for wanting to create a "sneaky"? Being able to put your tapered shaft on a house cue looking butt? So you can dupe your opponents into thinking you don't have a clue what you're doing between the rails?
LOL
 

Coos Cues

Coos Cues
The reason i am/was trying to save the shaft is because it's still straight after banging around at a pool hall for at least 10 years. It seems like at this point it ain't warping, no?
Most older house cues are short of 58 inches anyway so using the entire thing ends up with a short cue just like it was before minus what you cut out in the center.

A two for one can work good. One has an ugly butt and is straight. You use the shaft wood cutting it extra long and then cut the good butt a little long too. You end up with a few extra inches of shaft wood before you get to the splice so even if the tip is messed up you can make a nice shaft out of it. When I started out this is how I did my conversions.

There is a fine line between gate keepers and ass hats. This forum has had it's share of both over the years.
 
Top