What does pumping the cue over and over up in the air before their shot do for the pros?

fastone371

Certifiable
Silver Member
I have to write "bull sh-t" on looking good if your not a pro doing the air "sky swish."
Who cares what people do before they get down on a shot, how in the world does that affect your game???? What if people use body english, does that make you miss or distract you? Some people follow thru on the break to the point of bending their shaft on the table, is that worse than the alleged "air slash" as someone coined the term??? FYI, its not a slash, that would entail side to side movement, I have never seen that, it seems some people need to pay more attention. If this is one of the biggest things going on in the pool world its a slow week in pool. I have to go practice tipping the 8 ball in the rack from on top of the other balls with my thumb when I am racking now. SMH.
 

APA Operator

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I do it now, not out of habit (yet), but out of necessity. When I was younger, my vision was better and I had the muscle memory required for a straightish stroke, so I could just step into a shot and it was all coordinated. Then I had mini strokes that destroyed my ability to trust that muscle memory. So I had to find another way to coordinate everything. Enter "feeding yourself". At first after the strokes I couldn't even hit my mouth correctly with a fork full of food. But I quickly re-developed that muscle memory. It's very hard, however, to "unforget" muscle memory. It's all subconscious and after you have strokes your brain doesn't know it's no longer valid - your brain needs conscious feedback. So now before I shoot a shot I stand behind it and "feed myself". That shows me what line my stroke is on and I put the rest of my body in line with that stroke so I can trust it. Maybe some day I will have developed enough new muscle memory that I can just trust the stroke, but maybe not, so for now this seems to help.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I do it now, not out of habit (yet), but out of necessity. When I was younger, my vision was better and I had the muscle memory required for a straightish stroke, so I could just step into a shot and it was all coordinated. Then I had mini strokes that destroyed my ability to trust that muscle memory. So I had to find another way to coordinate everything. Enter "feeding yourself". At first after the strokes I couldn't even hit my mouth correctly with a fork full of food. But I quickly re-developed that muscle memory. It's very hard, however, to "unforget" muscle memory. It's all subconscious and after you have strokes your brain doesn't know it's no longer valid - your brain needs conscious feedback. So now before I shoot a shot I stand behind it and "feed myself". That shows me what line my stroke is on and I put the rest of my body in line with that stroke so I can trust it. Maybe some day I will have developed enough new muscle memory that I can just trust the stroke, but maybe not, so for now this seems to help.
I developed the habit of air shooting my shots to get the cue line right. It's way more consistent than than just lining up your face.
 

SmoothStroke

Swim for the win.
Silver Member
Feeling the weight of the cue, propelling mass. The swing arm controls the weight pulling it forward.
It doesn't hurt to feel the weight when analyzing a shot, the cue speed, and stroke, it's all one dance.
Shortening or lengthening the grip is common.
I air stroke hip to hip with my arms down, others take out ceiling tiles.

I may be 3 inches from the object ball and want to float forward 3 inches, or I have baby nip shot, a bunt.
I shorten my grip slightly, it's not major movement.
I'm air stroking short smooth movements, feeling the weight of the cue and stroke prior the shot.

If I have to move the cue ball a good distance I will slide back on the grip and take longer and slower
air strokes. Moving the hand to different grip positions is very suttle but you feel the weight shift.
You're not holding it close to the joint or off the butt cap. Most of the time it's not noticeable to anyone but you.

Short Stroke, Mid Stroke, and Long Stroke technique are best achieved with the proper grip for each.
Air stroking and feeling the shot is part of the flow for a smooth rhythm.
Baseball players, golfers are feeling the stroke, the weight of their tools.
The Cue Ball is the name of the game.
I'll add to my original post.
Watch people who don't move their arms while walking, it's the walking dead. They move stiff legged and flat footed,
they look like they need an intervention.
No rhythm, so stiff you can use them as a cutting board, guaranteed not to be an Olympic Athlete.
Nobody's telling you to saw wood, just move it, once, twice, etc. let your hair down Shirley.
Air stroke the damm cue and find your flow. Ape Index and Body Gait are all connected. The sooner you learn
how to use it the better you will dance.
https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-definition/stiff+legged
 
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SmoothStroke

Swim for the win.
Silver Member
I've become so good at air strokes I now throw cue balls in the air and stroke stop
shots from across the room. I want to see Florian beat that.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Air strokes help me set my bridge hand perfectly and get into stance perfectly. Not some crazy windmill action but it gets the cue set properly for the upcoming shot. It's almost a subconscious thing. When I'm playing dead nuts I do it and my stance is utterly rock solid with the perfect grip to apply the stroke. Hard to describe, but almost like pulling a bow back.

If I'm playing bad it feels less like a dance and more like standing blindfolded in front of a firing squad. Tense and bad.
 
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