Where do you hit the CB to get the most spin in a draw shot?

dquarasr

Registered
If you look at this study you can see that the pros hit all their draw shots with almost the same contact height on the cue ball. I think that by just hitting a ton of draw shots you will find this spot intuitively. The spot is 17.4 mm (11/16inch) from the cloth.

"A group of 20 top elite players (height: 180.2 ± 6.7 cm, mass: 80.3 ± 13.5 kg), all of them ranked under the top 80 of the Euro-tour of the European Pocket Billiard Federation, 5 of them former world champions"


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Interesting as heck. Do you know if the 11/16” quoted is the distance around the circumference of the sphere (where the CB touches the cloth) to where the cue touches the CB, or measured from the cloth directly below the CB contact point?

I would assume it’s the latter.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Interesting as heck. Do you know if the 11/16” quoted is the distance around the circumference of the sphere (where the CB touches the cloth) to where the cue touches the CB, or measured from the cloth directly below the CB contact point?

I would assume it’s the latter.
Yes, it's the height of the hit measured straight up from the cloth, not around the ball's surface. You can tell by the fact that the centerball line is 28+mm high, half of 57.15mm, the height of a ball. And 11/16" is 1/8" higher than the lower miscue limit, which is 9/16" from the cloth (+ a touch for not-quite-level cue).

pj
chgo
 
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FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Be careful about hitting “the same spot” - the miscue limit moves up as you elevate.

pj
chgo
I agree. I think elevating the cue should be a last resort, only when speed and tip placement aren't sufficient. I'm one of those same spot players who prefers to adjust speed rather than move the tip higher. But I'll change the tip position before I resort to changing the angle of attack.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When working on long draw shots I simply say, "Try hitting a little higher than for max draw and see what happens." It's easy. The student gets a feel for it, just as I have. You can't reduce it to formulas because students don't learn by formulas. The physics part helps you understand the phenomenon but it is not required in play. It lets you know that there is something real there rather than some voodoo pool that has no basis in reality.
Yes, understood. But also, as you wrote before, it's counterintuitive. This will have to be a conscious decision, and because it counters the normal flow of a player's logic, it may have to stay as a conscious decision.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
The physics part helps you understand the phenomenon but it is not required in play. It lets you know that there is something real there rather than some voodoo pool that has no basis in reality.
(y)

I also think understanding the phenomenon can help with execution, even after you've "grooved the move".

pj
chgo
 
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