Whyte carbon shaft

SKILLZELITE

Universality
Gold Member
Silver Member
Finally got some time to read through the article you guys provided,definitely a interesting read, lots of good info in there.

Excerpt from the write up ....
-v-v-v
"However, for a given stroke speed and cue elevation, changing the joint or butt can have an effect on CB swerve and therefore net or effective CB deflection (AKA squerve). "

My question is if different styles of joints can affect deflection, wouldnt a loose joint/insert do the same?
 
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marini3105

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Finally got some time to read through the article you guys provided,definitely a interesting read, lots of good info in there.

Excerpt from the write up ....
-v-v-v
"However, for a given stroke speed and cue elevation, changing the joint or butt can have an effect on CB swerve and therefore net or effective CB deflection (AKA squerve). "

My question is if different styles of joints can affect deflection, wouldnt a loose joint do the same?
What I referred to earlier wasn't the joint coming loose. The screw that holds the insert in position would loosen, slightly, and cause a sound similar to a cracked shaft. Less than a half turn on the screw would fix it. I didn't experiment with impact to my shot, I tightened it and moved on.
 

MurrayNevada

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Would I be able to get some low strength (purple) Loctite on those threads? And, where do you order the shaft? I emailed a question to the website and never received an answer. I asked about the shaft taper and probable delivery time.
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
Finally got some time to read through the article you guys provided,definitely a interesting read, lots of good info in there.

Excerpt from the write up ....
-v-v-v
"However, for a given stroke speed and cue elevation, changing the joint or butt can have an effect on CB swerve and therefore net or effective CB deflection (AKA squerve). "

My question is if different styles of joints can affect deflection, wouldnt a loose joint/insert do the same?
You have to read all of it and not be selective. Just prior to that it says "Can the joint or butt of a cue affect CB deflection (squirt)? No!".

And just after that he elaborates by saying that the joint does not affect deflection, but can affect swerve, but even then it only affects swerve if it changes the weight of the cue or the cue's hit efficiency either of which can have a slight affect on the cue ball speed, and it is that change in cue ball speed that can in turn affect swerve. If the joint being loose is not somehow changing the weight or efficiency of the cue (and it wouldn't) then it won't even affect swerve but in no case can it affect deflection.
 

marini3105

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Would I be able to get some low strength (purple) Loctite on those threads? And, where do you order the shaft? I emailed a question to the website and never received an answer. I asked about the shaft taper and probable delivery time.
I did Loctite 242 on my OB. Bad idea. The interchangeable insert screws into a secondary threaded insert. With loctite they both come out. Recoverable situation but 20 minute exercise of not boogering the threads up and then cleaning everything
 

MurrayNevada

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Good info about the Loctite, thanks. I have a shaft in my shopping cart but am waiting to learn the shaft taper and have not found the answer. I've emailed Whyte the question about the taper and the turn-around time this afternoon and am awaiting a reply.
 

smoochie

NotLikeThis
Any1 here knows about the whyte taper? is it similar to the revo's 12.4? also do they have a 12.3 or less? I don't want 12.5 as someone above mentioned.
 

MurrayNevada

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
To me one of the most important things in shaft selection is the shaft taper and that cannot be found to date. Most shaft manufacturers have that info on their websites. I'm sure we will eventually learn the type of taper on these Whyte carbon fiber shafts.
 

Tooler

AhSheetMaDruars
Silver Member
Thank you! where can I see the type of taper of the 12.25 !! I feel that would be good for me. I wanna know if the taper similar to revo 12.4?
I don't think they are similar. They look like a pro taper or "gradual rise" taper similar to the Cynergy.

Maybe someone can take a few measurements..?


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Shawn Armstrong

AZB deceased - stopped posting 5/13/2022
Silver Member
Thats a typical pro taper. I don't think the revo is pro taper but dang I like the revo taper.
A 12” straight section from the ferrule is hardly a “pro taper”. A pro taper usually has slight growth all the way back. With CF, you can do freaky stuff like that, without fear of warpage. If you cut a wood shaft the same way, it would be prone to warping, and would also play like a wet noodle.
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
To me one of the most important things in shaft selection is the shaft taper and that cannot be found to date. Most shaft manufacturers have that info on their websites. I'm sure we will eventually learn the type of taper on these Whyte carbon fiber shafts.
With the old regular deflection solid wood shafts the shaft taper was responsible for the vast majority of the stiffness, feel, and hit of a cue because the shafts were solid maple and maple doesn't vary much in stiffness from one shaft to another. Differing ferrule and joint materials affected feel and hit a little bit as well but they did not affect stiffness at all and overall it was still the taper that made the vast majority of the difference for these shafts especially when it comes to stiffness.

With the wooden low deflection shafts there was a little more to it than just the taper because one manufacturer might have hollowed out slightly more of the shaft length than another, or bored a slightly larger diameter hole than another (and a few even had carbon tube inserts etc), and these things change the stiffness, feel, and hit properties of the shafts some as well but the shaft taper was still the quite dominant factor.

With the 100% carbon fiber shafts things are much different now though. The shaft taper is no longer going to be nearly as dominant in determining stiffness, feel, and hit as it has been in the past with wood shafts. Shaft wall thickness (and whether that thickness is uniform throughout or varies along the length of the shaft) will also play a very dominant role. You can have two shafts with identical tapers, joints, and ferrules and that will on the surface appear to be identical in every way but they will play completely differently if the shaft wall thickness is different between them. It also doesn't take very much wall thickness difference to have a pretty big impact on stiffness, feel, and hit.

I don't know how much shaft wall thickness differences there currently are between carbon fiber shaft manufacturers, but if it ever varies much at all between them then it is forever going to be a dominant factor that has to be considered along with the taper (we obviously won't be able to use that information until we get that information though but it is important to know). Even once we always have the wall thickness information for all the shafts out there it is still going to be tricky to know how some of those shaft's properties will compare and it will take some data and experience because it could be that a shaft with a stiffer taper but thinner wall will play similarly to a shaft with a more lengthy pro taper but a thicker wall, etc. The bottom line is that for carbon fiber shafts the shaft wall thickness is now very important along with the taper.
 
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Shawn Armstrong

AZB deceased - stopped posting 5/13/2022
Silver Member
With the old regular deflection solid wood shafts the shaft taper was responsible for the vast majority of the stiffness, feel, and hit of a cue because the shafts were solid maple and maple doesn't vary much in stiffness from one shaft to another. Differing ferrule and joint materials affected feel and hit a little bit as well but they did not affect stiffness at all and overall it was still the taper that made the vast majority of the difference for these shafts especially when it comes to stiffness.

With the wooden low deflection shafts there was a little more to it than just the taper because one manufacturer might have hollowed out slightly more of the shaft length than another, or bored a slightly larger diameter hole than another (and a few even had carbon tube inserts etc), and these things change the stiffness, feel, and hit properties of the shafts some as well but the shaft taper was still the quite dominant factor.

With the 100% carbon fiber shafts things are much different now though. The shaft taper is no longer going to be nearly as dominant in determining stiffness, feel, and hit as it has been in the past with wood shafts. Shaft wall thickness (and whether that thickness is uniform throughout or varies along the length of the shaft) will also play a very dominant role. You can have two shafts with identical tapers, joints, and ferrules and that will on the surface appear to be identical in every way but they will play completely differently if the shaft wall thickness is different between them. It also doesn't take very much wall thickness difference to have a pretty big impact on stiffness, feel, and hit.

I don't know how much shaft wall thickness differences there currently are between carbon fiber shaft manufacturers, but if it ever varies much at all between them then it is forever going to be a dominant factor that has to be considered along with the taper (we obviously won't be able to use that information until we get that information though but it is important to know). Even once we always have the wall thickness information for all the shafts out there it is still going to be tricky to know how some of those shaft's properties will compare and it will take some data and experience because it could be that a shaft with a stiffer taper but thinner wall will play similarly to a shaft with a more lengthy pro taper but a thicker wall, etc. The bottom line is that for carbon fiber shafts the shaft wall thickness is now very important along with the taper.
So many falsehoods in this post, I wouldn’t know where to start debunking.
 
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