Will Cleaning Simonis Cloth With a Wet Cloth Permanently Make It Slower?

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Like most topics on here, it seems like there’s a completely wide range of responses. Some say wetting it down with a wet cloth is fine and some don’t. I think I’ll stick to a damp cloth as opposed to wetting it down more aggressively with a rung out wet towel.
I don't think anyone has condoned using a wet towel... Only a damp one. I only had to do it because it was already completely soaked... I could have wrung it out. So I already had it in mind that I would have to replace the cloth anyway. I had nothing to lose to try it. I went ahead and saturated the rest of the cloth to make it even. Then toweled the whole thing dry the best I could.
 

chalkdust

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't think anyone has condoned using a wet towel... Only a damp one. I only had to do it because it was already completely soaked... I could have wrung it out. So I already had it in mind that I would have to replace the cloth anyway. I had nothing to lose to try it. I went ahead and saturated the rest of the cloth to make it even. Then toweled the whole thing dry the best I could.
How did it play?
 

tableroll

Rolling Thunder
Silver Member
My buddy, who also has run a pool room for a very long time says that if you wipe down Simonis cloth with a wet towel to clean and bring back the color to it, it will permanently slow it down, unless you iron the cloth after it dries.

He says if you iron it after it appears dry, it will maintain the same speed, but if you let it dry without ironing it, it will play slower. Any thoughts on this by anyone who knows?
Damp towel is the same water that is in the air. Humidity. Will not hurt the playability of the cloth. If you have a dehumidifier, good to keep going from time to time to keep humidity low.
 

whammo57

Kim Walker
Silver Member
The clothe I replaced was absolutely filthy and wasn't simonis, I really wanted to throw it in the washer and reinstall just to see what happened but I'm way to lazy to cover a table twice just for an experiment lol
I have taken the dirty cloth to the dry cleaners............ it came out nice....... do not wash it.......... it will shrink

Kim
 

WildWing

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My buddy, who also has run a pool room for a very long time says that if you wipe down Simonis cloth with a wet towel to clean and bring back the color to it, it will permanently slow it down, unless you iron the cloth after it dries.

He says if you iron it after it appears dry, it will maintain the same speed, but if you let it dry without ironing it, it will play slower. Any thoughts on this by anyone who knows?
Although vacuuming is best, a damp towel over the table is just fine. Picks up most dust and chalk.

It doesn't slow the cloth down. If anything, it speeds the cloth up a bit, as the cloth will tighten up a bit as it dries. Remember, damp, not soaking wet. And keep the iron off the table. It can damage the seal, whether beeswax, bondo, or plaster.

Oh, and stop taking advice from that buddy.

All the best,
WW
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
I've never done that but just recently my son took a shower, got dressed and then changed his shirt and threw his semi wet shirt on top the table. He didn't realize it was wet and I didn't catch it for hours, and now I have a permanent water stain the size of a football.

Guess my point is unless you wet it down even then you'll have stains
It wasn’t just water it had something in the shirt then. Plain water does not stain cloth
 

CaptainBly

Registered
I vacuum first then wipe with wet cloth making bed very wet, dry with fan. Cloth will shrink and tighten up and be slick as a whistle.
I have done this with tables where I worked and on my home tables with Simonis. Never had a problem afterwards and it seemed to speed them up a little not slow them down.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Something I found interesting about worsted wool is that it can absorb up to 30% of its mass in water and not feel wet. So a wipe down with a damp cloth will remove surface junk but not get it really wet to the point that it won't dry fairly quickly. Even if it does get really wet it will dry fine because the fibers are woven so densely it won't 'fluff up' like cheaper woolen cloth.
 

Al Spez

New member
Windex???? WTF???
Believe it or not, YES!!! Just a couple of months ago, the owner of the only pool hall in my area (in operation for more than 30 years with 16 tables) told me that they sprayed blue Windex on their tables--all covered in Simonis cloth-- for years to address blemishes and restore uniform color. The owner said you must use blue Windex (no generic stuff) to reactivate the dye in the wool. For some reason, it works well with green cloth but not blue. We didn't talk about any other colors. You spray the entire table (not just a spot here or there) and the Windex-dampened dye will take care of most discolorations. Dry with a microfiber towel. Supposed to do a good job but it won't fix burn marks. I'm guessing other pool room operators are aware of this maintenance routine. Unfortunately, it's no help to those who have gone to Tournament Blue.

I haven't had the need to use Windex, or any other cleaner, on my cloth so far. I had my 8-foot home table covered with Simonis 860 HR a little over a year ago and keep it clean with a small, hand-held vacuum cleaner and the X-1 pad that Simonis sells. I use those things nearly every day. (I'm a beginner on the table 3-4 hours a day trying to learn how to play.) I've been able to clean even pronounced chalk marks caused by long practice sessions just by using the vacuum and pad.

Please note: I don't know whether this trick is specific to Simonis cloth or might work with materials manufactured by others.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Believe it or not, YES!!! Just a couple of months ago, the owner of the only pool hall in my area (in operation for more than 30 years with 16 tables) told me that they sprayed blue Windex on their tables--all covered in Simonis cloth-- for years to address blemishes and restore uniform color. The owner said you must use blue Windex (no generic stuff) to reactivate the dye in the wool. For some reason, it works well with green cloth but not blue. We didn't talk about any other colors. You spray the entire table (not just a spot here or there) and the Windex-dampened dye will take care of most discolorations. Dry with a microfiber towel. Supposed to do a good job but it won't fix burn marks. I'm guessing other pool room operators are aware of this maintenance routine. Unfortunately, it's no help to those who have gone to Tournament Blue.

I haven't had the need to use Windex, or any other cleaner, on my cloth so far. I had my 8-foot home table covered with Simonis 860 HR a little over a year ago and keep it clean with a small, hand-held vacuum cleaner and the X-1 pad that Simonis sells. I use those things nearly every day. (I'm a beginner on the table 3-4 hours a day trying to learn how to play.) I've been able to clean even pronounced chalk marks caused by long practice sessions just by using the vacuum and pad.

Please note: I don't know whether this trick is specific to Simonis cloth or might work with materials manufactured by others.
Whatever. I'd never use it or recommend it. Windex(regular kind) has ammonia in it and that can't be good for the cloth.
 

BasementDweller

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I use a tightly rung out rag (so more than damp) on mine from time to time. The damper the more it will slow the table down temporarily, as it most likely raises the fibers a bit. If you do this just once you'll be amazed how much chalk you get out and you'll never look back. Vacuuming just doesn't do the job well enough. I did mine just last night and I did just barely beyond a damp cloth and it didn't slow my 760 down a bit but it sure did clean it up. I think it actually prolongs it's life as it keeps the balls cleaner and there's just not as much dust on the table, which wears it out faster. But I really don't care about cloth longevity as it's really a marginal expense over the long run.
 
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