wooden joint sleeves

perspicaz

o-^-*-^-o
Silver Member
Hi!

I know most joints have stainless steel or phenolic sleeves, but I sometimes see wooden (cocobolo, bocote or maple for example) sleeves.

Are these wooden sleeves convenient for a radial pin or are they more fragile than the SS or phenolic counterparts?

I am going to order a cue and, while I find the wooden sleeves more attractive, I am worried they are going to crack easily.

Thanks.
 

BLACKHEARTCUES

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
perspicaz said:
Hi!

I know most joints have stainless steel or phenolic sleeves, but I sometimes see wooden (cocobolo, bocote or maple for example) sleeves.

Are these wooden sleeves convenient for a radial pin or are they more fragile than the SS or phenolic counterparts?

I am going to order a cue and, while I find the wooden sleeves more attractive, I am worried they are going to crack easily.

Thanks.

Last week I put a new tip on a Q I made 18 years ago. It has a Bacote joint. This is one of many wooden jointed Qs that I have made, including my personal jump/ break Q. It has 2 Cocobolo joints...JER
 

QMAKER

LIVE FREE OR DIE
Silver Member
perspicaz said:
Hi!

I know most joints have stainless steel or phenolic sleeves, but I sometimes see wooden (cocobolo, bocote or maple for example) sleeves.

Are these wooden sleeves convenient for a radial pin or are they more fragile than the SS or phenolic counterparts?

I am going to order a cue and, while I find the wooden sleeves more attractive, I am worried they are going to crack easily.

Thanks.

Besides the woods JER mentioned ebony, especially Gaboon, also makes for a very strong and durable joint material.

Bob Flynn
Denali Pool Cues
 

Chris Byrne

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As long as the cue is used for what it was intended there is no problem with a wood joint sleeve. Chris.
 

Craig Fales

Registered bubinga user
Silver Member
Ages ago I made a pair of cues with cocobolo joints and they have never cracked to my knowledge...they have a very distinct feel to them...
 

RocketQ

It's Not Rocket Science
Silver Member
I prefer to use wood joints. The four I like most are Cocobolo, Bubinga, Morado, and Bloodwood. I am not one much for stainless or phenolic although in a breaker phenolic is thew way to go IMO.
 

d_flash

Rack it up, I'll break it
Silver Member
think about it. if wood joints were a problem, why would everybody and his brother still make sneaky petes ? :p
 

Arnot Wadsworth

Senior Cuemaker
Silver Member
Joint Collars

perspicaz said:
Hi!

I know most joints have stainless steel or phenolic sleeves, but I sometimes see wooden (cocobolo, bocote or maple for example) sleeves.

Are these wooden sleeves convenient for a radial pin or are they more fragile than the SS or phenolic counterparts?

I am going to order a cue and, while I find the wooden sleeves more attractive, I am worried they are going to crack easily.

Thanks.

The purpose of a joint collar is to prevent the forearm and shaft from spliting. Phenolic is much stronger than wood and is the best material from a strength standpoint.

A wood joint collar is not nearly as strong as phenolic.

Good Cuemaking,
 

BLACKHEARTCUES

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Arnot Wadsworth said:
The purpose of a joint collar is to prevent the forearm and shaft from spliting. Phenolic is much stronger than wood and is the best material from a strength standpoint.

A wood joint collar is not nearly as strong as phenolic.

Good Cuemaking,

Hi Arnot, I agree wholly. Wood is not as strong as the modern plastics & phenolics, but I for one have always liked to keep my Qs simple. I love the look of beautiful wood & if I can use it as a joint material, have it perform well & add to the uniqueness of my work, I'll go for it. If any part should fail on my Qs, I will repair or replace it. So far none of these wooden joints have been back, with a failure. The 1st Q I ever saw with a wooden joint collar, was a Q by Ray Schuler in the 80's. I was blown away by the unusual beauty of a Cocobolo joint( my favorite wood, by the way). I couldn't wait to try it & have made I have made a 1/2 dozen or so every year since. Hope this finds you & yours well...JER
 

RocketQ

It's Not Rocket Science
Silver Member
I know this is probably overkill but if strength is an issue why not put a phenolic sleeve under the wood collar. To add strength it only need to be 0.030" thick.
 

Arnot Wadsworth

Senior Cuemaker
Silver Member
Wood Joint Collars (Examples)

RocketQ said:
I know this is probably overkill but if strength is an issue why not put a phenolic sleeve under the wood collar. To add strength it only need to be 0.030" thick.

That is one way to achieve strength but here is the method I use. Click on the thumbnail below for a better view:






Good Cuemaking,
 

Bill the Cat

Proud maker of CAT cues
Silver Member
Question......

For those that do use wood for a joint collar material.

How exactly do you install them? Do you bore the wood to form a "tube" of wood and install over a tenon (like installing phenolic tube) or do you cut a solid piece with a tenon that extends down into the forearm? or?????

Don't know if I described my question well enough :confused:
 

RocketQ

It's Not Rocket Science
Silver Member
Arnot Wadsworth said:
That is one way to achieve strength but here is the method I use. Click on the thumbnail below for a better view:






Good Cuemaking,
Great rings... I didn't think that would look right but once again I am wrong. Great rings....
 

RocketQ

It's Not Rocket Science
Silver Member
Bill the Cat said:
For those that do use wood for a joint collar material.

How exactly do you install them? Do you bore the wood to form a "tube" of wood and install over a tenon (like installing phenolic tube) or do you cut a solid piece with a tenon that extends down into the forearm? or?????

Don't know if I described my question well enough :confused:
Just like the phenolic... Some thread I do not.
 

perspicaz

o-^-*-^-o
Silver Member
Thanks everyone for all the replies. :)

I see everybody cites cocobolo... but I have seen maple and tulipwood joint collars too, are these suitable woods also?
 

Strokerz

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
How about the dymondwood? I have made some joint collars from it before and they turned out very good. Any others use it much?
 
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