Rear chuck

bubsbug

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I am thinking about scrapping my rear chuck adapter idea. I got my new rear chuck yesterday. It has internal threads and measures 1.478 I.D. My spindal on my lathe also has internal threads, it measures, 1.532. Wouldnt I be better off finding what the thread pitch are for both and making a nipple so that I could screw into both sides. My only worry would be that one side or the other may loosen up when it spinning. I already made an adapter that just slides over the o.d. of the spine, but I havnt drilled for set screws yet. Any ideas, Thanks!
 

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cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Step up to a small shoulder in the middle between the two thread types. This gives you a nice flat face area for the spindle and chuck to bottom out to.
 

cutter

Steve Klein Custom Cues
Silver Member
Better idea than your previous aluminium gadget. Hard part will be the internal threads. If you have an import, it will be metric. Cutting interior threads is a pain, you can't really see what you are doing inside the adaptor. Use a little loc tite and it won't come loose.
 

cutter

Steve Klein Custom Cues
Silver Member
Sorry should have looked at the pictures first. Hope you didn't pay to much for that chuck. Your going to have to shim everything you put in it.
It may scroll, but it won't be consistent. If you are using it to just keep things from flopping around it's ok, but if you want to hold one end of the cue while you bore the other, you have to indicate it perfectly straight.
With this type of chuck, you have to shim to correct it. I have adjust tru on both ends and makes life a lot simpler. As lite as that thing is, aluminum is probably ok. I bet if you take the back nut off of the spindle, you'll find a set of threads you can mount your adaptor on. By the time you put a nipple inside the bore, you'll lose a lot of your ID. My jet had a double nut, I just took one off and screwed the adaptor on.
 
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olsonsview

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have one of those chucks on my general purpose lathe

It is ok for quick jobs, and tips, But for working on components like the A-Arm the lathe spindle is too long, and the A-arm too short to be held by the chucks. So for major close tolerance work I use the main chuck and a center rest with a 35 mm id ball bearing in it, I made bushings for the 35 mm id to hold shafts and butts for putting in pins and boring. If you hold your cue parts in bushings, and all the bushings are the same size OD, you can true up both the chucks to run very true for one size opening. Even a run-true type chuck is only dead nuts at one size I believe. But you have to commit to a bushing size, and make a lot of them in small step increments if you want to use the chuck you have. It is nice to not have 30-50 lbs of iron spinning out there. Makes me nervous.
 

Jon

Custom User Title
Silver Member
Here are some pictures of an adapter I made recently.
I think the best way to machine the adapter is by using an expanding mandrel, when machining the final O.D.'s and threads.
And yes, in the second pic (1267), i think a little more thread cutting oil could have been used :D .
But damn, i love that picture.
 

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Jon

Custom User Title
Silver Member
Jon said:
Here are some pictures of an adapter I made recently.
I think the best way to machine the adapter is by using an expanding mandrel, when machining the final O.D.'s and threads.
And yes, in the second pic (1267), i think a little more thread cutting oil could have been used :D .
But damn, i love that picture.
Here are a couple more pics.
 

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QMAKER

LIVE FREE OR DIE
Silver Member
REAr CHUCK

bubsbug said:
I am thinking about scrapping my rear chuck adapter idea. I got my new rear chuck yesterday. It has internal threads and measures 1.478 I.D. My spindal on my lathe also has internal threads, it measures, 1.532. Wouldnt I be better off finding what the thread pitch are for both and making a nipple so that I could screw into both sides. My only worry would be that one side or the other may loosen up when it spinning. I already made an adapter that just slides over the o.d. of the spine, but I havnt drilled for set screws yet. Any ideas, Thanks!

Hi: Save yourself a lot of trouble and use your center rest with a bearing as described on several post here. That method is dead on and most of all SAFE.
If you just have to have a dual chuck system buy a lathe from Hightower for your light work. Good luck.

Bob Flynn
Denali Pool Cues
 

olsonsview

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Like I said earlier

I have both systems. That same small chuck you bought and the center rest with the bearing. I like the small chuck for long pieces that can be held by both chucks, and yes it is not a perfect chuck for accuracey. If you are holding with that second chuck , make darn sure your main chuck is tight, and doing the work of keeping the mass spinning, or you will find your nice cue and little chuck unthreading in a heartbeat. The little chuck will mess with your accuracey more as you cut further away from the jaws of the Main chuck. For short parts, like a handle sleeve, or an A-arm, or where you want dead nuts accuracey like for a pin installation, the center rest is the way to go. You may also have to modify the center rest to fit a large OD ball bearing, that is another story.
As far as the little lathes like the hightower, they are great for some jobs, I really wish i had one sometimes. But for very accurate work you can never do better than a properly set up metal lathe. Yes, slower to make useable for cues, but when you dial it in ... wow!
 
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bubsbug

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
rear chuck

Jon said:
Here are a couple more pics.
What is the wall diameter of the adapter that fits the chuck end. I have the same chuck. I made an adapter today except for external threading, and notice my wall to be .083 thick with a through hole of 1.4. Do you think this wall is thick enough, its made out of steel instead of aluminum.
 

bubsbug

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
QMAKER said:
Hi: Save yourself a lot of trouble and use your center rest with a bearing as described on several post here. That method is dead on and most of all SAFE.
If you just have to have a dual chuck system buy a lathe from Hightower for your light work. Good luck.

Bob Flynn
Denali Pool Cues
Are you saying that a setup like this one is more accurate than a rear chuck?

http://forums.azbilliards.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=13284&d=1136432143
 

QMAKER

LIVE FREE OR DIE
Silver Member
Center Post Set-up

Hi: YES, a center post is more accurate than trying to adapt 2 chucks to run dead on. You just get a cheap magnetic dial indicator set from Grizzley and dial in your test bar. Once it is set, it is set forever. No more shimming or wondering what went wrong with that last pin you installed. Go to DZ Cues Web site. He explains it perfectly. Good luck.

Bob Flynn
Denali Pool Cues

bubsbug said:
Are you saying that a setup like this one is more accurate than a rear chuck?

http://forums.azbilliards.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=13284&d=1136432143
 

Jon

Custom User Title
Silver Member
bubsbug said:
What is the wall diameter of the adapter that fits the chuck end. I have the same chuck. I made an adapter today except for external threading, and notice my wall to be .083 thick with a through hole of 1.4. Do you think this wall is thick enough, its made out of steel instead of aluminum.

The taig chuck isn't all that heavy.
So you don't need the wall as thick as some might think.
I think the I.D. of my adapter is around 1.325".
As i was boring it out, i just stopped when the wall started to look a little thin.
On the chuck end of the adapter, I believe the wall thickness is around .080 to .090 thick FROM THE MINOR DIAMETER of the threads.

It would be best for you to acquire some expanding mandrels.
Bore your adapter out to around 1.000 I.D. and use the mandrel to machine the outside, then after all of that is done, bore it out to final size.

Jon
 
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