Timmy Scruggs

EasyMoneyIzzy

Active member
Here’s is a 80s and 90s Scruggs cues. Both cues play great.
 

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fjk

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don’t own any but have played extensively with two. I can close my eyes and you can hand me a cue and I will most likely know which is the Scruggs.

His cues are holy grails.
I agree and I believe people are starting to catch on. You notice how much his cues are bringing now?

I have owned a real lot of Scruggs cues from probably every decade he was making them. I have never seen one of his cues which wasn't flawless and rock solid. I have no idea how many cues he built in his lifetime, but it must be a few thousand. But despite there be so many out there, there's still not enough supply to fill the demand (thus very high prices when they do hit the market).
 

shooter_Hans

Well-known member
I agree and I believe people are starting to catch on. You notice how much his cues are bringing now?

I have owned a real lot of Scruggs cues from probably every decade he was making them. I have never seen one of his cues which wasn't flawless and rock solid. I have no idea how many cues he built in his lifetime, but it must be a few thousand. But despite there be so many out there, there's still not enough supply to fill the demand (thus very high prices when they do hit the market).
Scruggs is this time period’s Balabushka in my opinion. The man was ahead of his time. Look at his points and inlays, you would think he was a time traveler. His cues were perfect and most importantly played well.

I grew up in California and most of the older guys played with Tads and Ginas. My first encounter of an East Coast guy was Scruggs and this was pre-internet days. I was told it was a holy grail cues.

Used and worn cues are hitting 3k. A good condition and original I see hitting 4-7k easy. Looks like there are a few that went to Japanese owners. The cortland wraps are indicator of being original. They still exist but very few.

Didn't the "who's who of cue making" crossed paths with Scruggs? I heard it was a circle of friends or cue makers? I'm not familiar with the backstories of these guys on the East Coast.
 
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WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
Scruggs is this time period’s Balabushka in my opinion. The man was ahead of his time. Look at his points and inlays, you would think he was a time traveler. His cues were perfect and most importantly played well.

I grew up in California and most of the older guys played with Tads and Ginas. My first encounter of an East Coast guy was Scruggs and this was pre-internet days. I was told it was a holy grail cues.

Used and worn cues are hitting 3k. A good condition and original I see hitting 4-7k easy. Looks like there are a few that went to Japanese owners. The cortland wraps are indicator of being original. They still exist but very few.

Didn't the "who's who of cue making" crossed paths with Scruggs? I heard it was a circle of friends or cue makers? I'm not familiar with the backstories of these guys on the East Coast.
By the 'who's who of cue making," you are probably referring to Bill Stroud and Dan Janes, originally of Joss Cues in Baltimore. Bill later went out west to found Joss West, and Tim worked with Dan at Joss Cues until 1978 when he left to go on his own and create Tim Scruggs Cues.
 

shooter_Hans

Well-known member
By the 'who's who of cue making," you are probably referring to Bill Stroud and Dan Janes, originally of Joss Cues in Baltimore. Bill later went out west to found Joss West, and Tim worked with Dan at Joss Cues until 1978 when he left to go on his own and create Tim Scruggs Cues.
Yea, did they all know one another at some point? Tony for BB too?

I don’t know much about the backstory but this always interests me.
 

WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
Yea, did they all know one another at some point? Tony for BB too?

I don’t know much about the backstory but this always interests me.
Early on, and we're talking the late 60s and maybe early 70s, all three worked together, Bill, Dan, and Tim. Believe it or not, Mike Sigel too, worked with them in the shop, learned cuemaking there. I forget exactly what year Bill left to make Josswest cues, but would have likely been in the early 70s.

Tony Scianella, of Black Boar, yes, he got into cue making I believe in the late 70s and went on to make Black Boar cues. From speaking to Tony, he had a hand in teaching Mike Cochran the art of cuemaking. Why is that important? Because Mike Cochran became Tim's partner from something like 1990 until his death. An outstanding duo of cuemaking to the end.
 
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