Amazing how a tight grip can foul things up.

judochoke

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was practicing this shot last night, and out of 10 shots, 8 went into the side pocket for a scratch. I kept scratching my head, trying to figure out what i was doing wrong. Tried hitting the cue ball harder, no luck, tried hitting easier, no luck. ( it was late, and i think i was a little tired)
I finally stood back, relaxed, thought about the shot, where to hit the cue ball on the rail before the object ball, ect. And I just relaxed, and this time i noticed that i had a nice loose grip.

Boom, tight past side pocket into perfect position. Made 8 in a row, shooting not very hard. A tight grip has messed up my draw shot before, so now I’m making sure to have a loose grip pretty much on all my shots.

But it makes sense, if the back of the cue moves because of that tight grip, it’s not good.
 

judochoke

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The shot
 

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FunChamp

Well-known member
I agree with PJ. The cue doesn't know how you are standing or gripping. The correct motion of the cue to the CB is what matters. That being said, the tighter the grip and more muscles involved in any stroke means more things can go wrong. However, the only thing that truly matters is can you repeat the way you do it consistently and get the correct result. Some methods work better for different folks. Gotta find what works for you.
I can try to copy any player from any era and make it work but most don't feel right bc it's simply not me. Hope that helps
 

tomatoshooter

Well-known member
I think it's usually the grip tightening (clenching) during the stroke that moves the butt and therefore the tip. Both loose and tight grips can work if they don't clench during the stroke.

pj
chgo
I've definitely had that problem and maintaining a firm grip helps a lot. It's pretty hard to use a lot of upper arm strength and keep your hand relaxed. I'm amazed at the number of "power" shots like force follow and long draw that seem to benefit from consciously stroking through the cue ball instead of trying to hit harder. Stunning to the side when there is not much angle still seems to require a lot of power.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've definitely had that problem and maintaining a firm grip helps a lot. It's pretty hard to use a lot of upper arm strength and keep your hand relaxed. I'm amazed at the number of "power" shots like force follow and long draw that seem to benefit from consciously stroking through the cue ball instead of trying to hit harder. Stunning to the side when there is not much angle still seems to require a lot of power.
The sideways carom stroke is probably an illusion as well. If you hit slightly below the center line and swing the cue like it was a follow shot, the sweet spot's probably in there.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
that is a good thought for a draw
Yes if you tend to kill the ball drawing or can't control the speed, that's probably the secret. Same thing with dead ball stops and caroms. The problem might be that zero spin and perfect caroms are so difficult to "zero" in on, they cause a tension reflex. Don't know. Just throwing stuff out here.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Watch the best women players...
Funny as that sounds, it was Chen Si Ming that open my eyes on how to hit the cue ball. Like most "serious" pool players, I had been around a pretty healthy cross section of players and champs but all I cared about was what the balls did and just banged at stuff. Copying that effortless delivery was the biggest technical improvement I ever made.
 

Brookeland Bill

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was practicing this shot last night, and out of 10 shots, 8 went into the side pocket for a scratch. I kept scratching my head, trying to figure out what i was doing wrong. Tried hitting the cue ball harder, no luck, tried hitting easier, no luck. ( it was late, and i think i was a little tired)
I finally stood back, relaxed, thought about the shot, where to hit the cue ball on the rail before the object ball, ect. And I just relaxed, and this time i noticed that i had a nice loose grip.

Boom, tight past side pocket into perfect position. Made 8 in a row, shooting not very hard. A tight grip has messed up my draw shot before, so now I’m making sure to have a loose grip pretty much on all my shots.

But it makes sense, if the back of the cue moves because of that tight grip, it’s not good.

Hold the butt like you would hold a bird. Sam Snead also said the same thing when gripping a golf club.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
...maintaining a firm grip helps a lot.
I think we instinctively tighten the grip to "brace for impact" as the tip hits the ball - fortunately that instinct can be fought with any kind of grip. I like a grip mostly using the thumb and first two fingers, just tight enough to quiet the urge to clench, loose enough to permit a little wrist flexibility.

pj
chgo
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The best way to grip a cue is to shake hands with it…….position your wrist so there is a full hinge and
as tight as you’d shake hands with someone you just met. Grasp not too tight & use a lighter firm grip.
Let the cue rest on the pads of your fingers, knuckles facing the floor & back of your hand facing the wall.
 

dendweller

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Funny as that sounds, it was Chen Si Ming that open my eyes on how to hit the cue ball. Like most "serious" pool players, I had been around a pretty healthy cross section of players and champs but all I cared about was what the balls did and just banged at stuff. Copying that effortless delivery was the biggest technical improvement I ever made.
it's why I like a somewhat tacky handle, allows me to really quiet my hand during the stroke while still feeling like I have control of it.
 
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