Break Stats -- 2019 Diamond Las Vegas Open (9-Ball), July 2019

AtLarge

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Here are some aggregate break statistics from the 2019 Diamond Las Vegas Open 9-Ball event played July 17-20 at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada with free streaming on CueSports International's YouTube channel.

This was a double-elimination event with 106 players. All races were to 7 until the final match, which was to 9. Niels Feijen won the event.

Conditions -- The conditions for the streamed matches included:
- Diamond 9-foot table with new blue Predator XK2 cloth;​
- Predator Arcos II balls, including a black-triangles cue ball;​
- triangle rack;​
- rack your own with the 1-ball on the foot spot;​
- alternate breaks from anywhere behind the head string;​
- 3-point rule in effect: the break is illegal (and non-breaker has an option to shoot) unless at least 3 balls cross the head string or are pocketed;​
- jump cues allowed;​
- foul on all balls;​
- no shot clock; and​
- all slop counts, including the 9-ball on the break.​

The stats are for all 16 matches (170 games) that were streamed by CSI, listed here in the order in which they were played. These 16 matches were 7.6% of the event's total of 210 matches played

Wed. July 17
Niels Feijen defeated James Aranas 7-6​
(Kevin) Cheng Yu-Hsuan d. Roberto Gomez 7-5​
Raymund Faraon d. Darren Appleton 7-4​
Ko Ping-Chung d. Naoyuki Oi 7-2​

Thurs. July 18
Francisco Bustamante d. Max Eberle 7-0​
Skyler Woodward d. John Morra 7-6​
Feijen d. Ko Pin-Yi 7-0​
Mieszko Fortunski d. Billy Thorpe 7-5​

Fri. July 19
Fabio Rizzi d. Kristina Tkach 7-5​
Chang Jung-Lin d. Joshua Filler 7-1​
Carlo Biado d. Albin Ouschan 7-4​
Eklent Kaçi d. Corey Deuel 7-0​

Sat. July 20
Aranas d. Shane Van Boening 7-5​
Feijen d. Fortunski 7-2 (Hotseat Match)​
Fortunski d. Woodward 7-4 (Semifinal)​
Feijen d. Fortunski 9-7 (Finals)​

Overall results

Successful breaks (broke legally, made at least one ball, and did not foul) -- 74% (64 of 87) for match winners, 67% (56 of 83) for match losers, and 71% (120 of 170) in total​
Breaker won the game -- 79% (69 of 87) for match winners, 46% (38 of 83) for match losers, and 63% (107 of 170) in total​
Break-and-run games -- 45% (39 of 87) for match winners, 28% (23 of 83) for match losers, and 36% (62 of 170) in total​
Illegal breaks -- 3% (3 of 87) for match winners, 6% (5 of 83) for match losers, and 5% (8 of 170) in total​

Here's a breakdown of the 170 breaks (for match winners and losers combined).

Legal, made at least one ball, and no foul:
Breaker won the game: 88 (52% of the 170 games)​
Breaker lost the game: 32 (19%)​

Illegal, made at least one ball, and no foul:
Breaker won the game: 1 (1%)​
Breaker lost the game: 0 (0%)​

Fouled (includes 1 break that was both fouled and illegal):
Breaker won the game: 0 (0%)​
Breaker lost the game: 8 (5%)​

Legal, dry, and no foul:
Breaker won the game: 17 (10%)​
Breaker lost the game: 18 (11%)​

Illegal, dry, and no foul:
Breaker won the game: 1 (1%)​
Breaker lost the game: 5 (3%)​

Therefore, whereas the breaker won 63% of all games (107 of 170),
He/she won 73% (88 of 120) of the games in which he/she broke legally, made at least one ball, and did not foul (successful breaks).​
He/she won 100% (1 of 1) of the games in which he/she broke illegally, made at least one ball, and did not foul.​
He/she won 0% (0 of 8) of the games in which he/she fouled on the break (whether wet, dry, legal, or illegal).​
He/she won 49% (17 of 35) of the games in which he/she broke legally, dry, and did not foul.​
He/she won 17% (1 of 6) of the games in which he/she broke illegally, dry, and did not foul.​
He/she won 38% (19 of 50) of the games in which the break was illegal, fouled, or dry (all unsuccessful breaks).​

Break-and-run games -- The 62 break-and-run games represented 36% of all 170 games, 58% of the 107 games won by the breaker, and 52% of the 120 games in which the break was successful (made a ball, legal, no foul).

With alternating breaks, B&R "packages" of the normal type are not possible. But we can still look at the breaks of a given player and see how many he or she ran on his or her own successive breaks, and we can call these "alternate-break packages." The 62 break-and-run games consisted of 1 alternate-break 4-pack (by Feijen), 5 alternate-break 3-packs (two by Aranas and one each by Morra, Chang, and Fortunski), 12 alternate-break 2-packs, and 19 singles.

9-balls on the break -- The 62 break-and-run games included 4 9-balls on the break (2.4% of the 170 breaks).
 
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AtLarge

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Miscellany from the data for the 2019 Diamond Las Vegas Open 9-Ball event
[This relates only to the 16 streamed matches, not to all matches in the event.]

• The most balls made on a single break was 4 -- done thrice, once by Faraon (B&R), once by Kaçi (a win, but not by B&R), and once by Fortunski (B&R).

• The average number of balls made on all breaks was 1.1. On successful breaks (legal, made at least one ball, and did not foul), the average was 1.5.

• 58% (98 of 170) of the games ended in one inning – 36% (62) won by the breaker (B&R) and 21% (36) won by the non-breaker. Just 5% (8 of 170) of the games lasted more than 3 innings.

• 48% (81 of 170) of the games were run out by the player who was at the table following the break. These run-outs were:
- By the breaker after successful breaks (B&R games) – 52% (62 of 120)​
- By the non-breaker after wet but illegal breaks -- 0% (0 of 1)​
- By the non-breaker after fouls on the break – 100% (8 of 8)​
- By the non-breaker after dry breaks – 27% (11 of 41)​

• The player who made the first ball after the break:
- Won the game in that same inning 68% of the time (113 of 166)​
- Won the game in a later inning 15% of the time (25 of 166)​
- Lost the game 17% of the time (28 of 166)​
[Note -- total games used here are 166 rather than 170 to eliminate the 4 games in which no ball was made after the break.]​

• In the 15 races to 7, the loser won an average of 3.3 games. Two matches went hill/hill and three matches were whitewashes.

• The average elapsed time for the 15 races to 7 was 58 minutes, averaging 5.6 minutes per game. The elapsed time was measured from the lag until the winning ball was made (or conceded), so it includes time for racking and timeouts.

• The race to 7 that was longest in elapsed time, at 79 minutes, was Rizzi d. Tkach 7-5. The match highest in average minutes per game, at 7.2, was the Finals -- Feijen d. Fortunski 9-7.

• The match that was shortest in elapsed time, at 36 minutes, was Chang d. Filler 7-1. The match that was lowest in average minutes per game, at 3.9, was Faraon d. Appleton 7-4.

• Breaking fouls averaged 1 for every 21.3 games, other fouls 1 for every 6.8 games, and missed shots about 1 for every 2.3 games.

• About 33% of the games involved one or more safeties.
 
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AtLarge

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Illegal breaks (violation of the 3-point rule) were quite low in this event compared with others that I have tracked. Just 5% of the breaks were illegal in the streamed matches for this event; in other events it has averaged about double that.

And illegal breaks on otherwise successful breaks (made at least one ball and did not foul) numbered just 1 here, remarkably low. [Actually, a second "wet" illegal break occurred, but the players seemed unaware of it; so I did not count that one.]

I think all of the other events I've tracked that used a 3-point rule also used a breaking template, whereas here they racked with a regular triangle. It's not clear to me whether that should have had any effect on breaking legally.
 

spartan

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9-balls on the break -- The 62 break-and-run games included 4 9-balls on the break (2.4% of the 170 breaks).

Thanks for the stats, AtLarge
I think the golden breaks in this event must be one of highest. It may anecdotal but I do not recall seeing 2 golden breaks in matches I watched in an event before


Illegal breaks (violation of the 3-point rule) were quite low in this event compared with others that I have tracked. Just 5% of the breaks were illegal in the streamed matches for this event; in other events it has averaged about double that.

And illegal breaks on otherwise successful breaks (made at least one ball and did not foul) numbered just 1 here, remarkably low. [Actually, a second "wet" illegal break occurred, but the players seemed unaware of it; so I did not count that one.]

I think all of the other events I've tracked that used a 3-point rule also used a breaking template, whereas here they racked with a regular triangle. It's not clear to me whether that should have had any effect on breaking legally.

There was one match (I forgotten which one) where JJ and other commentator said it was illegal break but breaker continued shooting
I would think to properly implement this, need table ref not zonal ref.
Also if I am not mistaken, in Matchroom events where they use regular triangle, they have ref to do racking and no rerack allowed.
:wink:
 

AtLarge

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... I think the golden breaks in this event must be one of highest. It may anecdotal but I do not recall seeing 2 golden breaks in matches I watched in an event before

With a racking template, the 9-ball generally remains close to where it started, and golden breaks are more rare. With a regular triangle, as in this event, the 9-ball tends to move around more often. Turning Stone, for example, has always used a regular triangle and no break box, and 9's on the break have been 2.0% or more quite a few times.

Also note that with such small numbers, a couple of additional or fewer 9's on the break changes the percentage quite a bit.


There was one match (I forgotten which one) where JJ and other commentator said it was illegal break but breaker continued shooting
I would think to properly implement this, need table ref not zonal ref.
Also if I am not mistaken, in Matchroom events where they use regular triangle, they have ref to do racking and no rerack allowed.
:wink:

Yes, that illegal (but wet with no foul) break was by Deuel in Game 2 of his match with Kaçi. They seemed to not be aware, and played on. So I didn't count that one in the stats, because the game would have changed entirely (Kaçi undoubtedly would have chosen to shoot) had they called the illegal break.
 

AtLarge

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Illegal breaks (violation of the 3-point rule) were quite low in this event compared with others that I have tracked. Just 5% of the breaks were illegal in the streamed matches for this event; in other events it has averaged about double that.

And illegal breaks on otherwise successful breaks (made at least one ball and did not foul) numbered just 1 here, remarkably low. [Actually, a second "wet" illegal break occurred, but the players seemed unaware of it; so I did not count that one.]

I think all of the other events I've tracked that used a 3-point rule also used a breaking template, whereas here they racked with a regular triangle. It's not clear to me whether that should have had any effect on breaking legally.

I imagine one significant factor in the small number of illegal breaks in this event compared with other events using a 3-point rule was the fact that there was no break box in this event. Many of the events producing much higher rates of illegal breaks used a narrow break box.
 

Cron

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It looked like Corey was aware of it, he just stood there and chalked very still for a length of time that seemed to suggest "You going to call it?". If you believe in karma, then how he was shooting from that point on would be no surprise.
 

pt109

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I imagine one significant factor in the small number of illegal breaks in this event compared with other events using a 3-point rule was the fact that there was no break box in this event. Many of the events producing much higher rates of illegal breaks used a narrow break box.

I think racking with a triangle is the reason for less illegal breaks.
...I saw more players hitting them hard.....
...Niels looked like Billy Johnson on some hits....Shane stopped being cute also.
 

AtLarge

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It looked like Corey was aware of it, he just stood there and chalked very still for a length of time that seemed to suggest "You going to call it?". If you believe in karma, then how he was shooting from that point on would be no surprise.

Could be. Unfortunately, karma doesn't often show up immediately in the form of 7-0 shellackings.

[but I'll still give him the benefit of the doubt]
 
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