coring photos

Ernie eyocues

Ernie Omori
Silver Member
just testing some experimental coring photos
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1087.JPG
    IMG_1087.JPG
    38.7 KB · Views: 60
  • IMG_1088.JPG
    IMG_1088.JPG
    53.1 KB · Views: 63
  • IMG_1089.JPG
    IMG_1089.JPG
    59.3 KB · Views: 62
  • IMG_1090.JPG
    IMG_1090.JPG
    58.4 KB · Views: 65

Korsakoff

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
just testing some experimental coring photos
I remember your posting these back in September 2023. At the time, I worked on them a bit in Photoshop to enhance the detail.

As I suggested back then, there is too much light when photographing the coring, so the detail is blown out. If you have an iPhone 15, it takes very good low-light photos. Just turn off the flash.

If not, then you can try either (a) adding more light but further away (like a table lamp or floor lamp), or (b) stretch a bit of cloth over your camera's flash. The latter is difficult because the flash is so close to the lens in mobile phones. You'd probably have to secure it with a bit of tape. You don't want a tight weave fabric, as it will be too opaque to let some of the light from the flash through. Another alternative would be to tape a bit of semi-opaque plastic over the flash. That, or buy a inexpensive camera just for photographing your work.

At any rate, good luck. Below are the enhanced pictures I posted as an example back in September.

Splice Lighting Adjustment 01.jpg


Splice Lighting Adjustment 02.jpg
 

Korsakoff

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Light absorbing material.*

I see the mistake everyday, the blue bed used as a back drop or background is reflecting and bouncing the flash all over the place, including directly into cameras lense.

Use light absorbing material.

Could be an old bed sheet or something worn out that's presentable, clean, not shabby.
Non reflecting.

If you can't find anything at home, visit a salvation army thrift store.
That is another good suggest regarding reflected light.

I think attention needs to be given both to reflected and direct light, though, based upon what I see in the photographs.
 

Coos Cues

Coos Cues
If I want sharp detail I set my camera to manual and put it on a tripod. No flash just play with shutter speed until you like the result. Start at f6. iso 400
 

Korsakoff

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
If I want sharp detail I set my camera to manual and put it on a tripod. No flash just play with shutter speed until you like the result. Start at f6. iso 400
Yes, completely agree.

But, from the posted photos, it does not seem the OP has an SLR or similar, no would the OP have the photographic skills to decipher your post.

Now, you can get into the debate regarding "should they", etc., but it appears they don't.

I was trying to assume limited resources and providing limited suggestions to obtain better result.

Whatever is posted, if instructional or demonstrative and not blown-out, I can fix it and repost for them. Unless, of course, they don't want that. It's possible to be correct in helping and wrong at the same time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bbb
Top