Does this ad bother you?

Does this type of advertising bother you, that which includes an F-bomb?

  • Doesn't bother me, 30 y.o. or younger

    Votes: 1 1.5%
  • Doesn't bother me, 30-50 y.o.

    Votes: 22 32.8%
  • Doesn't bother me, 50 or older

    Votes: 26 38.8%
  • Bothers me, 30 y.o. or younger

    Votes: 1 1.5%
  • Bothers me, 30-50 y.o.

    Votes: 2 3.0%
  • Bothers me, 50 or older

    Votes: 15 22.4%

  • Total voters
    67

SeniorTom

Well-known member
Does this ad bother you? It contains an F-bomb within its body of text, and seems a bit inappropriate due to the fact it reaches all facets of society. Some people might not think twice about it, but others may think it's inappropriate. It just seems a bit unprofessional to me.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20231128_143311_Gmail~2.jpg
    Screenshot_20231128_143311_Gmail~2.jpg
    80.6 KB · Views: 728

jason

Unprofessional everything
Silver Member
I would expect a letter after buying something from them that said something to the effect..."F___ it! We decided not to send your product."

Yes, it is an inappropriate Ad, but not surprisingly shocking in today's world.
 

Benelli

Well-known member
Does this ad bother you? It contains an F-bomb within its body of text, and seems a bit inappropriate due to the fact it reaches all facets of society. Some people might not think twice about it, but others may think it's inappropriate. It just seems a bit unprofessional to me.
As a CMO I can tell you that they have a really good read on segmentation of who buys the most stuff from them and the copy in that email is tailored to appeal to that demographic.

You are not that demographic, hence the cognitive dissonance when you read it.

Right now all advertising is in a huge state of flux as marketers struggle with how to be more relevant to their target and key segments while not alienating the fringe segments. At some tipping point, the data tells the marketer that the benefits outweigh the disadvantages and boom you get a pretend F-bomb in an email.

You have two options, 1. Unsubscribe from their marketing and find a vendor that is better aligned with your values. 2. Move on, let go, and realize that you may not be important to that vendor but still want to do business with them.
 

Monti

Active member
Doesn't bother me at all.
An advert is supposed to get people talking about it or paying attention and thanks to you many of us will see it that wouldn’t otherwise! I’d say ask them for a percentage

Plus the word is not written, it’s an expression that’s heard often. Many many more offensive ads out there

Ps Are you their marketing manager 😉
 

couldnthinkof01

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You may be missing the point. Many people use the f word, but the question is whether it's appropriate from a business perspective. The word doesn't have much impact to me unless it is spoken in an inappropriate setting .
I'd say it is at least effective and that's probably all that matters to them.
Like Benelli said, that's their target market language.
 

slide13

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Doesn’t bother my in the slightest. Is it a choice I’d make if I were running a business, probably not. But they may have their reasons or it may just be a reflection of the company.

If you’re expecting “class” from a site called pooldawg.com, you may be looking in the wrong place.
 

Banger

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Right now all advertising is in a huge state of flux as marketers struggle with how to be more relevant to their target and key segments while not alienating the fringe segments. At some tipping point, the data tells the marketer that the benefits outweigh the disadvantages and boom you get a pretend F-bomb in an email.

This may well be their logic, but I believe they are misguided. The only things the buying public wants from a company, are fair prices, and honest service. That will bring in the customers, and won't alienate anyone. All they needed to say was "Hey, we're starting our Black Friday sale early. Check out our low prices, right now."

As for me, I'm not offended by the F-word, and probably use it too often myself. And I'm not looking for anything from a company, but honesty. I just think there is a time and place for everything. I also think I'm entitled to judge a company by their actions, and words.

If unprofessional is the reputation they want to establish, they are well on their way.
 
Last edited:

Flakeandrun

Well-known member
They didn't say the F word, they simply implied it. They could have meant 'fudge' :ROFLMAO:
As consumers, we have the choice where we want to shop? If you deem it unprofessional. Shop somewhere else... (likely we will abandoned all care when we notice they have something we want, or a price that can't be beat - what morals? lol)
 

Tennesseejoe

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If I had a problem with their products...would that be their response? More than merely sub-standard...but I'm 'old school'.
 

SeniorTom

Well-known member
I am reading 'they can do what they want', 'it doesn't bother me', etc. What about integrity? If they use such tactics, can I trust them as much as a store that treats people with more respect? For me, no. I am a person that occasionally uses the F-bomb, but in my private with others that I know it's acceptable. I don't go spewing the word in stores, churches, and family get togethers. Because of this, I have chose not to buy from them anymore. Somebody's got to stand up for what is Honorable. I will shop at Seyberts or others. To me it looked and sounded very childish and I don't need that type of business to patronize.
 

Benelli

Well-known member
This may well be their logic, but I believe they are misguided. The only things the buying public wants from a company, are fair prices, and honest service. That will bring in the customers, and won't alienate anyone. All they needed to say was "Hey, we're starting our Black Friday sale early. Check out our low prices, right now."

As for me, I'm not offended by the F-word, and probably use it too often myself. And I'm not looking for anything from a company, but honesty. I just think there is a time and place for everything. I also think I'm entitled to judge a company by their actions, and words.

If unprofessional is the reputation they want to establish, they are well on their way.
Banger I appreciate your line of thought but you are fundamentally wrong. You are projecting a belief of what consumers want lensed entirely through your beliefs and views.

This is no different than that dumbass Bud Light marketing Exec that made a massive marketing decision not based on her demographic and segmentation data but her own personal beliefs.

I can assure you that Pooldawg is marketing to an audience that is 35 and under, almost exclusively because that is who is buying a majority of the products they sell.

Are you under 35 years old, not with a Regan quote in your sig file, no you are not...

Quite simply this advertising approach is not aimed at you and that's ok but don't second guess their marketing manager because you don't have one single iota of the data that person is using to base their copy decisions.

Maybe someone from Pooldawg is on this forum and can find out what the unsub rate was from that email and if it was high, lower, or the same as their other email comms...
 
Top