levelers for clawfoot table ?

redwolf88

Registered
Has anyone here have any expience modifying or retrofitting a clawfoot table with levelers? I have a GC3 table and it was no problem at all seting up and maintaining the level the past 15 years . In January 2020 I bought a used 8 foot table with clawfoot legs for my shore home in NJ. It was a nightmare getting it level ! After about 3 months of play it shows a little tweaking is necessary at the footend. I know it would look a little out of place but if I were to use something similar as on the GC table. I would prefer function over form any time. Here is a link to what I would try.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/6-1-4-Alum...:sc:USPSPriority!08088!US!-1&var=414258102799

When it comes to preferences to beauty, I never was a leg man anyway !
https://forums.azbilliards.com/images/smilies/biggrin.gif
 

tjlmbklr

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Has anyone here have any expience modifying or retrofitting a clawfoot table with levelers? I have a GC3 table and it was no problem at all seting up and maintaining the level the past 15 years . In January 2020 I bought a used 8 foot table with clawfoot legs for my shore home in NJ. It was a nightmare getting it level ! After about 3 months of play it shows a little tweaking is necessary at the footend. I know it would look a little out of place but if I were to use something similar as on the GC table. I would prefer function over form any time. Here is a link to what I would try.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/6-1-4-Alum...:sc:USPSPriority!08088!US!-1&var=414258102799

When it comes to preferences to beauty, I never was a leg man anyway !
https://forums.azbilliards.com/images/smilies/biggrin.gif

EDIT: I found my old post and the pics are still hosted, how about that.

https://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=28019


Yes I do but I unfortunately don't have pics anymore or have that table either. I had an Olhausen that was on a weak wood floor of a finished attic and it was always settling. I took each leg off and notched about 1.5" up from base and 2-2.5" in from back using a band saw and then I recessed a hole with a fortsner bit to accept a T-nut and drilled a deep hole to accept leveler legs bolt. I hope all that makes sense. From the front you could not see the levelers, only from the back/sides. I was happy with the results. This was also a mid/low grade Olhausen, I may not have done this on a very high end or antique table.
 
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trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
Great idea!!!

I have installed t-nuts and levelers in a similar way, but, notching out the foot like that is a good idea!

TFT


EDIT: I found my old post and the pics are still hosted, how about that.

https://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=28019


Yes I do but I unfortunately don't have pics anymore or have that table either. I had an Olhausen that was on a weak wood floor of a finished attic and it was always settling. I took each leg off and notched about 1.5" up from base and 2-2.5" in from back using a band saw and then I recessed a hole with a fortsner bit to accept a T-nut and drilled a deep hole to accept leveler legs bolt. I hope all that makes sense. From the front you could not see the levelers, only from the back/sides. I was happy with the results. This was also a mid/low grade Olhausen, I may not have done this on a very high end or antique table.
 

Ron Padilla

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well over a year ago I was looking for something to us as well and went to Amazon and did a search, I found some and they are still being sold! They are called Flatjax pool table levelers and run 199.00 shipped. There maybe other types that you might be interested but the one's above work without the table legs being modified!
 

tjlmbklr

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well over a year ago I was looking for something to us as well and went to Amazon and did a search, I found some and they are still being sold! They are called Flatjax pool table levelers and run 199.00 shipped. There maybe other types that you might be interested but the one's above work without the table legs being modified!

Those is pretty neat, pricey but very cool.

Link if anyone cares.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KCQSNQH?tag=duckduckgo-ffcm-20&linkCode=osi&th=1&psc=1
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

redwolf88

Registered
That is another interesting idea. Probably better for my situation as I do not have the wood working tools or experience to cut cut the clawfoots. Thank you for your input.
 

redwolf88

Registered
I use these machine levelers for machines.....and for furniture.

https://www.carrlane.com/en-us/prod...ing-feet/stud-leveling-feet-steel-zinc-plated

For a pool table, the pad size is obscure, but might need a plate under it on a weak floor. Would be fine on concrete.

I usually buy in quantity direct from Carr-Lane.

However, here's a representative retail price for similar item

https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tn...3AhZQTcM8TbALDaRw_cQjBexfZ14jsKcaAhQIEALw_wcB

smt
Another interesting solution to leveling a pool table! thank you !!
 

tjlmbklr

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
That is another interesting idea. Probably better for my situation as I do not have the wood working tools or experience to cut cut the clawfoots. Thank you for your input.


No problem, glad to help. Use masking tape on the areas and surrounding that you intend to cut to avoid scratches from the bed of the bandsaw. I experimented with a few ideas but a bandsaw was the way to go.
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I only posted the smallest size that i would consider for price comparison.
If you go down the Carr-Lane chart, the 5/8" rod has 2-1/2" pads; which is probably the size i would use on a clawfoot/furniture style.

However, the specs on the 1/2" rod, is going to be way stiffer than the legs themselves. IOW, any "wobble" is from the inherent architecture of the table leg, not the pad.
(Assuming a well thought out and craftsmanlike installation. Without that, it's easy to make a wobbly connection for any add-on)

Any of the options will need recessed or counter bored to keep the table height down. I make my own threaded inserts with either a Hex broach or a slot, to drive them in the wood.

3/4"-10 rod comes with a 3" pad. I'm thinking about using them if i ever get to work on my old BBC T-rail table. Though at that point, i have the machine shop and familiarity to make anything i want.

BTW. it is not necessary to get the swivel base feet. However, IME, they are more compliant, and hence set better with less deflection.

All the above stated. I have no skin in anyone else's game :)
Just posting a perhaps less common option that is quite well engineered to support machine tools without wobble or vibration so long as sized to the task.

smt
 

redwolf88

Registered
I only posted the smallest size that i would consider for price comparison.
If you go down the Carr-Lane chart, the 5/8" rod has 2-1/2" pads; which is probably the size i would use on a clawfoot/furniture style.

However, the specs on the 1/2" rod, is going to be way stiffer than the legs themselves. IOW, any "wobble" is from the inherent architecture of the table leg, not the pad.
(Assuming a well thought out and craftsmanlike installation. Without that, it's easy to make a wobbly connection for any add-on)

Any of the options will need recessed or counter bored to keep the table height down. I make my own threaded inserts with either a Hex broach or a slot, to drive them in the wood.

3/4"-10 rod comes with a 3" pad. I'm thinking about using them if i ever get to work on my old BBC T-rail table. Though at that point, i have the machine shop and familiarity to make anything i want.

BTW. it is not necessary to get the swivel base feet. However, IME, they are more compliant, and hence set better with less deflection.

All the above stated. I have no skin in anyone else's game :)
Just posting a perhaps less common option that is quite well engineered to support machine tools without wobble or vibration so long as sized to the task.

smt
So you don't think that the swivel type would move the table when you lean against it ? I am guessing that the total weight of the table pressing down would counter any lateral movement from leaning against it. Hmmm
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Force wise, it's like a straight pin into the floor. Except it has a shaped cup to protect the floor and keep the pin from sinking in, that allows the cup to conform without adding a bending moment to the pin. The stiffness of the system will depend oh how well it (or any) threaded rod is incorporated and fit into the existing leg.

Put it in a big sloppy hole with a thin T-nut for the threaded part retained by a couple bent prongs, and that will be a node in the system that reduces rigidity. If. OTOH, the nutplate or insert is "substantial" & a tight fit in the hole, which is also threaded above the nut/insert into the wood, it will be pretty stiff.

So there's 2 ways to think about the system. One as above, with a rigid connection into the existing wooden leg & a compliant system at the floor.

The second would be a threaded rod that is rigid in the foot, & the foot is large. Either the rod can thread up into the leg, or the foot can thread up & down on the rod. So long as it is rigid when tight (jam nut, say). Then the bending takes place at the connection into the wooden leg. So that has to be somewhat more compliant (flexible).

Either method can work.

There's other ways to make effective systems, but all systems get back to optimizing the adjustment range while minimizing the installation effort, factored by long term stability and ease of adjustment. :D

I can certainly see how the non-swivel would be an easier install for most people. No downside to it, either, so long as you can drill reliably straight perpendicular holes.
The swivel foot method implies you need to be very good about the details of the leg connection, but don't necessarily have to drill perfectly straight holes. :)

Again, don't let me put anyone out of their comfort zone. There's other perfectly good, many possibly better, solutions. So get the one you can effect in a way that is comfortable for your situation.

smt
 
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