ONE STROKING

bbb

AzB Gold Member
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Silver Member
C'mon. Let's get real here. It's nothing but idle curiosity to you. Regardless of what anyone says here, it's not like you're going to suddenly decide to devote a year of your pool-life to drop and shoot. If you are struggling with a problem with your game, I'll be happy to weigh in with the other instructors with an opinion that might help.
i missed this post when i posted above
FRAN
C'mon. Let's get real here.
let you get real
i asked a sincere question
not out of "idle curiosity"
but to sincerely get opinions from instructors/players more experienced than me.
if the consensus says its no good
why would i want to waste a year doing it?
other instructors such as randy and bob jewett were kind enough to share their thoughts ...THANK YOU VERY MUCH
all you have done is bust my chops .......i dont know why
 
I actually NOW make no 'practice" strokes. I did NOT consciously make the change to that. It just happened before I one day noticed the change.
I think one should have a very good reason for "consciously" trying to make such a change to one way or the other.
I do not even know why the change happened to me... but I would surmise that it was caused 'naturally" for whatever reason.
My focus is on "playing" the game. I almost never give any conscious thought to my stroke unless it pertains to making a change as in connection pressure or some other adjustment for some game related purpose.
 
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i missed this post when i posted above
FRAN
C'mon. Let's get real here.
let you get real
i asked a sincere question
not out of "idle curiosity"
but to sincerely get opinions from instructors/players more experienced than me.
if the consensus says its no good
why would i want to waste a year doing it?
other instructors such as randy and bob jewett were kind enough to share their thoughts ...THANK YOU VERY MUCH
all you have done is bust my chops .......i dont know why
Ms. Crimi can certainly answer for herself.

However,

I think it is because you come across as one just asking questions to be asking questions. There are guys in the Main Sec. who ask what color cloth they should put on their table. Perhaps it is the way you asked the question. Why could you not have simply asked, s"i there any advantage at all in not taking any practice strokes?

Just some thoughts
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I actually NOW make no 'practice" strokes. I did NOT consciously make the change to that. It just happened before I one day noticed the change.
I think one should have a very good reason for "consciously" trying to make such a change to one way or the other.
I do not even know why the change happened to me... but I would surmise that it was caused 'naturally" for whatever reason.
My focus is on "playing" the game. I almost never give any conscious thought to my stroke unless it pertains to making a change as in connection pressure or some other adjustment for some game related purpose.
thanks for the reply
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Ms. Crimi can certainly answer for herself.

However,

I think it is because you come across as one just asking questions to be asking questions. There are guys in the Main Sec. who ask what color cloth they should put on their table. Perhaps it is the way you asked the question. Why could you not have simply asked, s"i there any advantage at all in not taking any practice strokes?

Just some thoughts
i appreciate the feedback
but i think i did that
this my thread and first post
ONE STROKING
meaning no "feathering" or warm up strokes once down
is bad?
get down /address the cue ball (minor adjustment ok )
pull back and shoot
is it bad to do this?
 

Welder84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There's outliers to justify any argument. I could copy'n'paste a list of the last 10yrs of world champion players and none of them one stroke. They can, like we all can, but they don't play the game that way for a reason.

Reliable consistency regardless of the method is the point I think you're making. I agree completely.

Sorry I am not an instructor. I was reading the NEW thread section. Disregard my comment... ( Unprofessional opinion)
 

Cameron Smith

is kind of hungry...
Silver Member
I remember reading that it was a good way to test your trust in your alignment. I've tried it on occasion and can play fairly well without feathering. But it always sort of feels like a train that is going too fast and is wobbling on the turns.
 
i appreciate the feedback
but i think i did that
this my thread and first post
ONE STROKING
meaning no "feathering" or warm up strokes once down
is bad?
get down /address the cue ball (minor adjustment ok )
pull back and shoot
is it bad to do this?
Nope. I do not that is anything near like what I wrote.
 

One Pocket John

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As mentioned above this one stroke method is used to make certain that you fall down on the shot line correctly. CJ Wiley demonstrates this in one of his video's.

Nothing wrong with practicing this for a short time. If it doesn't fit into your normal rhythm naturally I would avoid using it in competition.

Another player uses this one stroke method all the time. Lee Brett.

John
 
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As mentioned above this one stroke method is used to make certain that you fall down on the shot line correctly. CJ Wiley demonstrates this in one of his video's.

Nothing wrong with practicing this for a short time. If it doesn't fit into your normal rhythm naturally I would avoid using it in competition.

Another player uses this one stroke method all the time. Lee Brett.

John
I disagree with your first statement... unless it is only being use in practice. How in a competition can it be used to "make certain" that you have fallen down correctly on the shot line? Please see my earlier post about how it somehow just became a new part of my game before I even consciously noticed it.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i appreciate the feedback
but i think i did that
this my thread and first post
ONE STROKING
meaning no "feathering" or warm up strokes once down
is bad?
get down /address the cue ball (minor adjustment ok )
pull back and shoot
is it bad to do this?
It's reckless for sure. I got to see Keith Mcready in my first couple years at pool and tried to adopt that kind of delivery. I could bang in dead outs but there's no substitute for competence and deliberate application.
 

One Pocket John

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I disagree with your first statement... unless it is only being use in practice. How in a competition can it be used to "make certain" that you have fallen down correctly on the shot line? Please see my earlier post about how it somehow just became a new part of my game before I even consciously noticed it.
Yes, it is only used in practice.
How in a competition can it be used to "make certain" that you have fallen down correctly on the shot line?
Practice thousands and thousands of times.

Here is another idea to practice being on the shot line. From a standing position, you have already determined the shot line and you get into the shooting position, using your normal amount of strokes, you look at the cues position on the cue ball, you look at the object ball, you then look at the cue ball, draw your cue back, but this time you don't look at the OB as you deliver the cue to the cue ball (see the tip of the cue strike the cue ball), you keep your focus on the cue ball and shoot. This practice will immediately let you know if everything was lined up correctly with the shot. This type of practice helps you to ask yourself, what in the hell am I doing wrong. Or, I'm doing real good.
This method is for practice only. I am aware that there are times when your focus has to be on the cue ball and not on the OB. :)

John
 
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Ratta

Hearing the balls.....
Silver Member
Using "One Stroking" often with students. Very often interesting, that a big amount of players makin more balls ( big percentage numbers!) and "suddenly" start to really deliver the cue better.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
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Silver Member
Using "One Stroking" often with students. Very often interesting, that a big amount of players makin more balls ( big percentage numbers!) and "suddenly" start to really deliver the cue better.
It doesn't allow their damn brain to get in the way. (y)

Another "no brain allowed" drill is to shoot wing shots. You don't have time to think.
 

3kushn

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I remember reading that it was a good way to test your trust in your alignment. I've tried it on occasion and can play fairly well without feathering. But it always sort of feels like a train that is going too fast and is wobbling on the turns.
I heard it was a good drill if you fall out of stroke.
Eyes closed is an add-on to the drill.
 

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
Mosconi didn't wiggle around much, just walk into the shot and shoot. I'm trying to emulate that rhythm a bit more.

Was he hashtagging?


Jeff Livingston
 
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