Purchasing CueStick - WHere to start? Help

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FearlessInc

Guest
I'm thinking about shelling out $200 for a new cuestick. I play regularly, and I'm starting to be serious in the game. I probably will never go pro or anything but any local tournaments or anything similiar, I would definitely be interested in joining. I'm just not sure where to start, with buying a cuestick. I'm not exactly a beginner. I know my fundamentals and I'm improving after each loss. Now just where to start. Thanks!
 

dmgwalsh

Straight Pool Fanatic
Silver Member
The price you mention sounds like used at ebay. I bought a good viking for about $125 and a new one for about 325 ( listed at 500). I don't know much about other cues. Am using a Bert Kinister Widowmaker now. McDermot, Schon, Jacoby Viking are all good names used in your price range. good luck. Dennis
 
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FearlessInc

Guest
Thanks. I guess I should go to a billiard store to ask or see about length, weight, etc. And then later, buy it online, at a reliable store? Hopefully it is straight but then again, I don't know. I might even bump to $300 for a stick.
 

penguin

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Take a look at DZ Custom Cues by Bob Dzuricky. His cues start at $275 and will be much better for your money than any production cue you could find. I'm sure other members of this forum would share good opinions about his work as well.

http://www.dzcues.com
 

Joseph Cues

Cue Nut
Silver Member
penguin said:
Take a look at DZ Custom Cues by Bob Dzuricky. His cues start at $275 and will be much better for your money than any production cue you could find. I'm sure other members of this forum would share good opinions about his work as well.

http://www.dzcues.com
I agree.
Find out what weight and tip diameter you want and give DZ your business.
 

Zims Rack

Promoting the Cueing Arts
Silver Member
Go to your local pool hall on a busy night or before a tournament. Buy a 6 pack of beer/coke, walk around and ask the players practicing if you can shoot a game with their cue for a beer/coke. Don't ask anything about the cue, just shoot a game like you normally would. When you're finished, ask details like maker, weight, shaft taper, ferrule material and what kind of tip. Try out about 6 different cues by different makers. Once you've shot with them you'll have an idea what you like or what feels right to you and it only cost you a six pack. Not satisfied or didn't find what you're looking for, buy another six pack and repeat. Once you've found your cue style, start searching the internet stores or local retail stores. It's good to post a poll or ask questions about cue makers here on AzBilliards, but remember...what you read will be OPINIONS and from different styles of players. Take what you read for what it's worth to YOU!

Best of luck!!!
Zim
 
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A

amateur

Guest
As a relatively fresh player...2 things.

1. Don't spend too much...1000$ cue will be only slightly better than 200$ cue
2. Don't buy graphite cue...it's the worst mistake you can make...they get very sticky quickly and you absolutely need a glove to play with those
 

maughanm

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Go ahead and add another $100 and get you a cue...My opinion, a decent cue starts at around 300 bucks.....and get you a good tip on it when you buy it.....that is half the cue.....Moori and Talisman are my favorites and there are many other good ones also.....mike
 
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Billy Jungle

Guest
DZ

I concur with the penguin . A great hitting great looking cue that will actually increase in value.
 
J

jnj

Guest
zim's right. Remember the opinion's stated here are just that.
Try out the cues never mind the brand (if possible) , once you like the feel that's the time you ask for the brand. You might be surprised its that cue from Kmart
 

Gideon

Registered
I really like this "sneaky pete" by DZ...
sp07.jpg

Kind of a twist on the whole sneaky pete idea...

And awww, memories, my first cue was a $12 Bud Light stick from K-mart.

Would be kind of fun to have that one and have people think "Oh here is a sucker."

I think Im gonna have to get one. hehe
 
F

FearlessInc

Guest
Yeah...I don't think I'll go for the custom cue that quick yet. Hopefully a $200 stick or so, from vendors like Vikings or Predator, or whatever (going to have to do some research)

Well, the local people @ my poolhall, I don't think I've seen much people using their own cues, basically because its filled with college kids probably.

I was asking for some suggestions, because I was hoping to have a few names in my head so if I check out the billiards shop, I can ask to see the ones I heard and see how they shoot, and feel. :)
 

twiztid_cue

Tweak!
Silver Member
I happen to like the hit and feal of the Lucasi cues. I own one and then i own a custom cue by Dominiak. every once in a while i like to switch cues and play with the lucasi. I liek it and other people that have used it liek it. Also you might want to try playes cues. I know people dont like them cause they are cheap but the owner of the pool hall i go to has been playing with one for years and doesnt play with anything else. try a bunch of different cues and find one you like.
 
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FearlessInc

Guest
I guess I should just go to a billiards store and just check them out. Don't the owners usually let you at least get a feel for them? And hopefully even take a shot with them?

Anything I should beware of if buying from a billiards store? Like them trying to sell me a bad stick or etc, etc.
 

Joseph Cues

Cue Nut
Silver Member
FearlessInc said:
I guess I should just go to a billiards store and just check them out. Don't the owners usually let you at least get a feel for them? And hopefully even take a shot with them?

Anything I should beware of if buying from a billiards store? Like them trying to sell me a bad stick or etc, etc.
They'll try to sell you cues they can't sell.:D
Make sure the cue is straight if you buy one.
If you're going to buy a production cue, I highly recommend Joss cues.
 
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FearlessInc

Guest
I was thinking about just checking out some Lucasi, Viking, Pechauer sticks.
 

Zims Rack

Promoting the Cueing Arts
Silver Member
For under $200...try McDermott, Viking, Lucasi, Players. You can't go wrong with a McDermott or Viking when starting out and you'll get something that looks good and plays good too! Most places will let you take a shot or two WITHOUT CHALKING it, but you wont get a good feel with just 1 shot! Sounds like to me, you're in the market for what I've listed. Pretty much any dealer will stock these or have access to them. I've got some! (had to put a plug, right?)

Zim
 

Banker Burt

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I am new to this forum, but not new to this game. I concur with Zim & Chuck's position about "Trying and then buying". The best players typically play in the best of rooms, and with the best of cues. Also, typically these rooms attract the best amatuers, and then every room has their regular patrons. This obviously becomes an excellent place to start looking for a cue. As a matter of fact, on any given night you may find a cue that is right for you, and a player whose mood is right to sell this cue (that you like)? You may just get it for half its value.

My suggestion though (while shopping for a cue), is to know what your personal game requires. Knowing what style of player you are in relation to your stroke, such as a finesse player like Varner, or a power player like Strickland will help emensely.

Then, buy a high quality "SneakyPete" with two shafts, both shafts 13-13.5mm & with a straight taper (just about all cue manufacturers produce simple models from $100-350). Now, practice REGULARLY with just one of the shafts. You may discover that it is too stiff. If so, find a good local cue-maker and explain how the cue feels (reacts) currently, and how you would like it to feel in your game.

Down-sizing the shaft (turning) by .25 mm will dramatically change how the cue feels, but don't change the taper. Now practice REGULARLY with this new feel and if necessary have it turned again. (west coast rate for turning a shaft is 30.-50.)

In 1-2 months of REGULAR pracitice you will now have the feel you are looking for in a cue, or you have turned the shaft to far (or too small), then go back to the best of all diameters and have the other shaft turned to that specification.

If this fails, you might consider lessons to deterimine a stroke that is best for you; because at this point it is not the cue.

By the way, a good cuemaker should know what you need by watching you hit a few balls. This is also a good way to know if a cue-maker really knows the equipment that they make, and how it applies to different players.

I may have raised a couple of issues about a straight taper and a good cue maker. Any comments...? It's your game and money at stake...
 
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