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Reload this Page Obvious Signs of an Amateur
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Ssonerai
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Today, 07:47 AM

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I can’t believe an aircraft mechanic would write such crap.
I'm sure he can defend himself, but i didn't quite take it the way you did. No doubt he is torquing fasteners (& spark plugs!) that are called out and normal practice. But there are an awful lot of bolts on an AC that might not be torqued to typical limits because doing so would affect the structure or such under it. One reason to have so many versions of anti-loosening nuts in so many places on AC, for one thing.

I'm pretty sure it was in one of the aviation rags (Light Plane Maintenance, maybe?) that reported a study (elsewhere) of skilled mechanics' sense of torque. Most were quite good at it and hit rather precise limits. Unfortunately, for good or bad, what most accurately sensed was the torque-to-yield regime, which is not always applicable, say in the other areas of an AC mentioned above.

Probably similar with pool tables. At max limit, you might sense when the slate gave or nut started to pull; bolt yield would be almost an order of magnitude higher. Then you would learn to never get that close again, and might under-strain the bolt for optimal table performance.

Torquing table bolts would never have occurred to me, but it makes perfect sense and seems the only prudent method for any well designed system. (one in which the components are uniform, repeat precisely in function, and are stressed to near the limit of one or more of the components)

Always worth having more info and another tool in the arsenals, metaphoric and practical.

smt

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Today, 01:50 PM

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Originally Posted by jtompilot View Post
I can’t believe an aircraft mechanic would write such crap. Of course many components can be tightened by feel but so many need a specific torque for bolt stretch in side an engine. How about those wheel bearings? I had to buy a 2 1/2 socket so I could torque ours. Do you torque spark plugs?

I believe rail bolt torque is important.

Don't you think if the manufacturers wanted the techs to use torque wrenches on the rail bolts they would of specified a torque range? As for the hardware that I torque as an A/C mechanic it is strictly up to the manual, if the manufacturer's manual list a specific torque range it gets torqued with a certified torque wrench (Not a Harbor Freight product either).

I'm not faulting Glen for sharing his experience here, like I said before I think he is passing along good info for the guy who doesn't turn wrenches on table rails and may do damage to wooden rails by over tightening bolts if a measurement is not stated.

Last edited by Lawnboy77; Today at 01:55 PM.
  
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Today, 02:18 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ssonerai View Post
I'm sure he can defend himself, but i didn't quite take it the way you did. No doubt he is torquing fasteners (& spark plugs!) that are called out and normal practice. But there are an awful lot of bolts on an AC that might not be torqued to typical limits because doing so would affect the structure or such under it. One reason to have so many versions of anti-loosening nuts in so many places on AC, for one thing.

I'm pretty sure it was in one of the aviation rags (Light Plane Maintenance, maybe?) that reported a study (elsewhere) of skilled mechanics' sense of torque. Most were quite good at it and hit rather precise limits. Unfortunately, for good or bad, what most accurately sensed was the torque-to-yield regime, which is not always applicable, say in the other areas of an AC mentioned above.

Probably similar with pool tables. At max limit, you might sense when the slate gave or nut started to pull; bolt yield would be almost an order of magnitude higher. Then you would learn to never get that close again, and might under-strain the bolt for optimal table performance.

Torquing table bolts would never have occurred to me, but it makes perfect sense and seems the only prudent method for any well designed system. (one in which the components are uniform, repeat precisely in function, and are stressed to near the limit of one or more of the components)

Always worth having more info and another tool in the arsenals, metaphoric and practical.

smt
You are exactly right! There are many cases where torquing is not required, or intended by the manufacturer, and in that case there are good safety devices used to prevent loosening of the hardware. In many cases bolts are designed to be loaded in shear only, and putting a torque tension load will decrease the strength. The bottomline is...it is of the utmost importance to do exactly what the manufacturer states.
  
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