20-30 year old Tim Scruggs Sneaky Pete

jigmoore

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
a buddy of mine found this cue about 20 years ago in a bar...he doesn't play pool at all. basically just stuck it under his bed...played with it maybe 5 times in those 20 years.

he was an old high school friend of mine. we reconnected here a couple months ago. i suggested we go play pool. he comes in and takes out that cue. i'm a 30 year player and not really a cue collector or aficianado, but i did immediately recongnize that this was an old Tim Scruggs. It has wear on it like it was used quite a bit back in the day, Tim has verified that it is one of his cues. my friend really does not appreciate the cue for what it is and i suggested he sell it to someone that does.

But here is my question: it has two very fine hairline cracks by the joint on the butt side. They run longitudinal to the cue and opposite of the grain lines. The cue rolls very straight and hits like a dream. if it were my cue, i'd just hit with it and watch to see if the cracks move at all and not address them unless they appeared to be growing. do you agree? or do you have a suggestion for an easy way to apply superglue into such a small crack? also a suggestion for a place to sell it would be appreciated.

thanks, here are some pics of the cue and the crack.

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SK Custom Cues

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
That can easily be fixed. Glue isn't really the answer. That crack line could start working it's way down wards and then you would have a totally useless piece of wood.

I would take it to a cue maker and have him put a joint collar on it.
 

ridewiththewind

♥ Hippie Hustler ♥
Silver Member
Would this not be a perfect example of a true sneaky being used to break with? IMHO, collars at the joint and shaft would have prevented this.

Definitely looks 'fixable' tho'. :D

Lisa
 

rhncue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This is the reason that I refuse to make Sneaky Petes. Joints are put on cues for a number of reasons and this is the main one. Wood absorbs and disperses moisture almost entirely through it's end grain. Joints and butt caps greatly retard this moisture transfer so helps keeping the wood from checking. Just how often do you find old Sneaky Petes in good shape, that is, if you can find them at all.

The best way to repair this cue is to remove the pin, bore a hole deeper than the cracks, make a plug that is a good fit, put some thin epoxy in the hole and on the dowel and slowly press into the bored hole. This will force the epoxy into any crack that is present and the excess will come to the surface. Wipe off the excess and then clamp the outside of the fore arm forcing the cracks closed again. When dry just reinstall the pin and the forearm will be stronger than before the cracks occurred.

I have some Delrin blocks that I made 25 years ago just for this purpose.They have a hole bored through, turned round and then split in half. I put one on each side of the prong and then tighten a couple of water hose clamps. I fixed dozens of cues in this manner.

Dick
 

j2pac

Marital Slow Learner.
Gold Member
Silver Member
This is the reason that I refuse to make Sneaky Petes. Joints are put on cues for a number of reasons and this is the main one. Wood absorbs and disperses moisture almost entirely through it's end grain. Joints and butt caps greatly retard this moisture transfer so helps keeping the wood from checking. Just how often do you find old Sneaky Petes in good shape, that is, if you can find them at all.

The best way to repair this cue is to remove the pin, bore a hole deeper than the cracks, make a plug that is a good fit, put some thin epoxy in the hole and on the dowel and slowly press into the bored hole. This will force the epoxy into any crack that is present and the excess will come to the surface. Wipe off the excess and then clamp the outside of the fore arm forcing the cracks closed again. When dry just reinstall the pin and the forearm will be stronger than before the cracks occurred.

I have some Delrin blocks that I made 25 years ago just for this purpose.They have a hole bored through, turned round and then split in half. I put one on each side of the prong and then tighten a couple of water hose clamps. I fixed dozens of cues in this manner.

Dick

What he said..............Dick is absolutely correct! Either go his route, or have a joint collar installed if possible. The cue as is, is a timebomb, waiting too become completely worthless. JMHO.
 

Busbee Cue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This is the reason that I refuse to make Sneaky Petes. Joints are put on cues for a number of reasons and this is the main one. Wood absorbs and disperses moisture almost entirely through it's end grain. Joints and butt caps greatly retard this moisture transfer so helps keeping the wood from checking. Just how often do you find old Sneaky Petes in good shape, that is, if you can find them at all.

The best way to repair this cue is to remove the pin, bore a hole deeper than the cracks, make a plug that is a good fit, put some thin epoxy in the hole and on the dowel and slowly press into the bored hole. This will force the epoxy into any crack that is present and the excess will come to the surface. Wipe off the excess and then clamp the outside of the fore arm forcing the cracks closed again. When dry just reinstall the pin and the forearm will be stronger than before the cracks occurred.

I have some Delrin blocks that I made 25 years ago just for this purpose.They have a hole bored through, turned round and then split in half. I put one on each side of the prong and then tighten a couple of water hose clamps. I fixed dozens of cues in this manner.

Dick

That is some very good advice, maybe add some joint collars for more protection.
 

cuemaker03

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I had a customer come in with a cue like that years ago, but worse!!! He had a crack like that at the joint and in the butt. I repaired both with joint color and a whole butt sleave.
 

jigmoore

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks guys for the advice.

I ended up selling the butt and shaft seperately.

The shaft went to someone who already had a Scruggs and needed an extra shaft.

The butt went to someone who wanted a Scruggs and was going to add a collar and would make their own shafts.

Worked out well.
 
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