AIM MORE ACCURATELY by Finding Your Ideal Personal VISION CENTER Head Position

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
FYI, I just posted a new video that demonstrates a new, fast, and reliable way to find and test your “personal vision center” head position to help you aim and align better and make more shots. Check it out:


Content:
0:00 - Intro
1:07 - Ball Setup
3:01 - Check Your Vision Center
4:05 - Find Your Vision Center
5:40 - Center-Table Drill
7:55 - Diagonal Shot Drill
9:40 - Wrap Up

As always, I look forward to your feedback, comments, questions, complaints, and requests.

Enjoy!
 

336Robin

Multiverse Operative
Silver Member
FYI, I just posted a new video that demonstrates a new, fast, and reliable way to find and test your “personal vision center” head position to help you aim and align better and make more shots. Check it out:


Content:
0:00 - Intro
1:07 - Ball Setup
3:01 - Check Your Vision Center
4:05 - Find Your Vision Center
5:40 - Center-Table Drill
7:55 - Diagonal Shot Drill
9:40 - Wrap Up

As always, I look forward to your feedback, comments, questions, complaints, and requests.

Enjoy!

This is a real thing with me.

I'm left eye dominant so when I've been not playing for awhile I always go through a break in period with cut shots to the right and straight in but I never seem to key in on it fast enough, but all of sudden all of my shots start going and they do this because the way I perceive them to be falls in line with the way I line them up.

I would bet that as I play more, I'm putting more of my left eye over the cue. I typically have my nose over the cue so cut shots to the right are bit harder to start making. I will try and pay attention to this the next time I play. Last two times I played I felt I was pulling it all back in and Id bet it was my vision center being better aligned.
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
This is a real thing with me.

I'm left eye dominant so when I've been not playing for awhile I always go through a break in period with cut shots to the right and straight in but I never seem to key in on it fast enough, but all of sudden all of my shots start going and they do this because the way I perceive them to be falls in line with the way I line them up.

I would bet that as I play more, I'm putting more of my left eye over the cue. I typically have my nose over the cue so cut shots to the right are bit harder to start making. I will try and pay attention to this the next time I play. Last two times I played I felt I was pulling it all back in and Id bet it was my vision center being better aligned.

Do the test and drills in the video. They well give you answers you can trust.
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
D, Dave...in your study did you consider horizontal alignment?

I cover this some in my article: Aim, Align, Sight – Part II: Visual Alignment (BD, July, 2011). It is best to have the face as square to the shot with the eyes as level as possible. Opening the stance some can help with this. When I opened my stance and got my face more square and eyes more level (with my vision center aligned properly) many years ago, my game took a big boost. For more info, see the videos on the stance resource page.
 

marini3105

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
I struggle with alignment (left eye dominant/right handed, usually have the cue ball miss target to the right), can't wait to try this out. I've been playing with closing my stance to shift my head position relative to my cue. That seems to have helped, of course it could be coincidental...
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
I struggle with alignment (left eye dominant/right handed, usually have the cue ball miss target to the right), can't wait to try this out. I've been playing with closing my stance to shift my head position relative to my cue. That seems to have helped, of course it could be coincidental...

Closing your stance can definitely help get your left eye move over the shot line (and make your left eye even more dominant concerning "vision center"), but you should carefully check your normal-stance "vision center" position first using the test and drills in the video. The downside of closing the stance is creating lots of neck and back strain which can lead to problem (ala John Morra). If you run into this problem my pool physical therapy videos can help. Please let us know what you find.
 

7stud

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Can you post a link to the laser level that you are using? Can it also project the shot line down onto the floor?
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
Can you post a link to the laser level that you are using?

I bought it at a Home Depot store many years ago, but I am sure you can find many options on Amazon. Some are even self-leveling!


Can it also project the shot line down onto the floor?

Yes, assuming you put in beyond the table (e.g., on a stool or ladder). It outputs an entire plane of laser light (forward, up, and down).
 
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Poolmanis

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
nice video Dave. I like especially thing about looking down to diamond to see where cue is. I have used that for years to get more consistent hit on 8- and 10-ball breaks.
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
Dr. Dave, I'm curious what percent of your cue balls return to your cue tip after being hit by the rebounded object ball? 5/10? 3/10?
... as well as it did in the video? ... probably 1 in 20. If I remember right, it happened on my 4th attempt, but I was honestly a little lucky to hit it that well. It is much tougher than it looks. If your aim is off even a hair, or if you have even a hint of sidespin, the CB won't come back to the tip like that. Give it a try.
 

kling&allen

Registered
... as well as it did in the video? ... probably 1 in 20. If I remember right, it happened on my 4th attempt, but I was honestly a little lucky to hit it that well. It is much tougher than it looks. If your aim is off even a hair, or if you have even a hint of sidespin, the CB won't come back to the tip like that. Give it a try.

Thanks for the feedback. I always run all your drills! It's helpful to know the failure rate as it avoids frustration and indicates how to measure success or improvement. You have other drills (following the ball into the pocket) in this video with set goals like 5 in a row.

I've noticed my alignment can vary based on how far I'm reaching over the table. I added a couple more dots on my table so I can check alignment when the cue ball is near the middle of the table. Once you have two dots on the table, you can place the laser level on the cloth and it's really easy to add more.
 

Poolmanis

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks.



That's a good idea to use this trick on a center break.
My 10-ball break i will normally have really close to Diamond between corner and and middle Diamond. You can use it too effectively. About half inch center from that Diamond.
Sometimes cue can go directly over Diamond. Depends how table will break.

This is what i do before match normally in 10-ball competition or match when warm up (or if no warm up then 1st break)
Step 1 : put cueball around that spot when one points cue to head on 1 ball, when cue is going that half inch inside of that next to middle DIamond.
Step 2: Break once hard with slightly elevated cue. It will leave mark to cloth where i did shoot break. Observe where you cue is located before you shoot break.
Step 3. Use that break spot and cue location to fine tune accuracy of your break.
If i get solid hit to 1-ball from that spot i normally have 1 ball really close to corner pocket and i make a ball really good %. Cueball need to have that little hop in air after hit to 1-ball though to break be effective though.

Sorry i have problems to describe process literally in English. I hope you get it :D
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
Cueball need to have that little hop in air after hit to 1-ball though to break be effective though.

Why do you think the CB needs to hop for the break to be effective. Or do you instead mean that if the break is effective with a square hit and good speed, the CB will hop because it is unavoidable due to slight downward hit on the CB from the slight cue elevation needed to clear the rail?
 

Poolmanis

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Why do you think the CB needs to hop for the break to be effective. Or do you instead mean that if the break is effective with a square hit and good speed, the CB will hop because it is unavoidable due to slight downward hit on the CB from the slight cue elevation needed to clear the rail?
In my opinion: cueball hop is happening when timing of stroke is good. It also allows 1-ball head towards corner pocket. Break need to be powerful to make it happen. When it hops controlled, break is powerful enough.
When i teach break shot to bad breakers I just want to them to be able make it hop and they have to break with good timing to make it happen.
When they can make it happen consistent their breaking ability normally take huge leap.
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
In my opinion: cueball hop is happening when timing of stroke is good. It also allows 1-ball head towards corner pocket. Break need to be powerful to make it happen. When it hops controlled, break is powerful enough.
When i teach break shot to bad breakers I just want to them to be able make it hop and they have to break with good timing to make it happen.
When they can make it happen consistent their breaking ability normally take huge leap.

I think CB hop on the break is mostly this: If the break is hit well with a square hit and good cue speed, the CB will hop because it is unavoidable due to slight downward hit on the CB from the slight cue elevation needed to clear the rail. There is no real advantage in the hop itself. For more info, see:

 
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