Bridge Hand Aiming

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
It's JMO. JUST MY OPINION. I assumed you knew what it meant. My bad.

No, I don't need any. The last paragraph of post #26 is in clear and precise English. That was and still is MY OPINION. If I have a reason, factual or otherwise, it was stated in that paragraph.

Much of my upcoming book review will also consist of my opinions. I will not be answering questions about same.
Then why were you complaining when I suggested using groove aim for beginners? Because you had a strong opinion, but zero facts?

That seems illogical. Do you agree?
Why don't you two get a room? Seriously this childish exchange... I mean it is the aiming forum but geesh guys.

I have no idea what your beef is but can you just agree to disagree and give it a rest already? We get it, you don't like each other. The thing is these exchanges just make both of you look bad.
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
Why don't you two get a room? Seriously this childish exchange... I mean it is the aiming forum but geesh guys.

I have no idea what your beef is but can you just agree to disagree and give it a rest already? We get it, you don't like each other. The thing is these exchanges just make both of you look bad.
If someone posted lies about you on this forum, I would defend you.
 

snookered_again

Well-known member
if someone is really green , id just show them the most common way to bridge and let it go, suggest watching others , trying different things , see what works for them. there's too much to worry about otherwise..

one I was shown and find handy is two fingers out, the other two back making a 4 point contact, this is for when there are other balls in the way and then I can raise my bridge or lower it over quite a large range , to bridge a ball in the way.. shoot over a ball in front of my CB... sometimes there is very little room so that wont even work, then you get creative, or grab a bridge.. No shame in using the one on the side of the table. I see a lot of shots where people miss shots trying to stretch too far, etc. some players are a bit shaky or have disabilities, so a fixed bridge is sometimes a help even with shots within reach.. having a newbie use the fixed bridge a bit more to get used to it and not shy about using it is worthwhile.

a mistake many newbies make is holding the bridge off the table when shooting , its better to lay it on the table at rest, with a hand on top ready to retrieve it if it needs to move away fast. the player should know by his intended shot if removing it fast is going to be necessary or not.

holding the end of the bridge off the table is sometimes necessary due to balls in the way. I think its best if it's left to sit still, and support itself, when possible if it's not at all parallel to the cue, that's ok. It's not an aiming stick.

its common for a newbie to want to set up and fire as quick as someone experienced, tking a bit more time to set up without a lot of pressure on their setup time and stroke might be helpful.. I think its common that newbies play poorly because they feel rushed, because others can do it all faster.. speed is not usually that critical, in a competition there could be limits, for a newbie.. Id say own the table, take your time, make your shot just pay attention and be reasonable and no one will fault a little slower setup time. if you want to walk around the table twice, or take 10 strokes and not 3, that's your right.. if you wanto bridge , find it awkward and need to experiment, change the bridge position, or stand back up and realign, thats ok.. the balls wont normally move on their own anyway.
 
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