can remove epoxied weight bolt? if so, how?

evergruven

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
elbow grease/tools have failed so far
as has a solder gun (tho maybe I didn't let it get hot enough?)
if the weight bolt is epoxied (only guessing it is)
is there any way to grab it out, without destroying the cue?
thanks for any help-
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
What type of head is on the bolt?
If you can chuck up a screwdriver or allen wrench and set the lathe to bull gear or lock the chuck you may be able to get more torque on it by turning the cue and not the screwdriver. Depending how deep it goes you may need to leave the iron on it much longer than you have already.
 

Tom1234

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Please, everyone forgive me for this question if there’s a reason to epoxy a weight bolt - why in the world would you epoxy something than was made to remove for any and all changes in cue weight?
 

billsey

Registered
You size the weight bolt to match what your design specs are. Once it's correct you shouldn't even need to change the bolt, hence the epoxy. Tuning the cue to the player is typically only done the one time.
 

Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
elbow grease/tools have failed so far
as has a solder gun (tho maybe I didn't let it get hot enough?)
if the weight bolt is epoxied (only guessing it is)
is there any way to grab it out, without destroying the cue?
thanks for any help-
The most important part of your question is missing.
What kind of cue is it?
Examples
Heubler weight bolts thread thru what looks like a lamp post. Made out of aluminum. They're a sucker to get out easily.

Older Cuetecs just used a metal slug epoxied in place. SURPRISE!

Over seas cues use a very course thread, moisture sets in and rust forms.
 
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Michael Webb

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Please, everyone forgive me for this question if there’s a reason to epoxy a weight bolt - why in the world would you epoxy something than was made to remove for any and all changes in cue weight?
This has always been questionable.
It's a real pain in the ass, especially with the amount of Cue flipping today.
The plain and simple truth is,
The Cue makers who epoxy them and or cover them with epoxy just don't want people to alter the weight of the Butt unless you request them to do it.
The other part for epoxying and sealing it, the weight bolt is more than a weight bolt. It's part of the Butts construction method along with a tenon to hold the Butt bottom on.

NOW, more than ever because of the amount of repair men and or so called repair men. It is good to know what your dealing with before it's attempted.
 

Kim Bye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Tempting to just write "carefully!" But as many others have pointed out, figure out what your dealing with first. If all else fails, you can always use a screw extractor and heat that up with a torch or induction heater. You will need to replace the bolt, but I guess that's why your trying to remove the bolt in the first place..
 

Tom1234

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This has always been questionable.
It's a real pain in the ass, especially with the amount of Cue flipping today.
The plain and simple truth is,
The Cue makers who epoxy them and or cover them with epoxy just don't want people to alter the weight of the Butt unless you request them to do it.
The other part for epoxying and sealing it, the weight bolt is more than a weight bolt. It's part of the Butts construction method along with a tenon to hold the Butt bottom on.

NOW, more than ever because of the amount of repair men and or so called repair men. It is good to know what your dealing with before it's attempted.
Thanks for clarifying; as always you make a lot of sense with your answers.
 

Welder84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You size the weight bolt to match what your design specs are. Once it's correct you shouldn't even need to change the bolt, hence the epoxy. Tuning the cue to the player is typically only done the one time.

That makes zero sense!

1). As "Earl" will tell you we change over time (our bodies) hence the need for possible adjustment.

2). Cue weight bolts do not need epoxy. If you really wanted to lock (not necessary) a weight bolt in you could use a light thread locker.
 

evergruven

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
thanks all for the replies
here are pics of the bolt
it's a cheap production cue
but I like the dimensions
except for the back weight
 

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L I F D 1

L S S T 10
Silver Member
get in there with a very good quality steel cutting drill bit, you may need more than one size.
MOMENT - did anyone see the amount of RUST.
try WD-40 first.
 

Sheldon

dontneednostinkintitle
Silver Member
I like to put a T-handled allen wrench into my bench vice, then put the cue on it and twist the #$%& out of it with both hands. If that fails, you're probably better off just finding another cheap cue.
 

L I F D 1

L S S T 10
Silver Member
I like to put a T-handled allen wrench into my bench vice, then put the cue on it and twist the #$%& out of it with both hands. If that fails, you're probably better off just finding another cheap cue.
what Sheldon said sounds good , let me ask.... anyone think of Heating or Chilling the base of the butt where the screw lye's
I mean wrapping it in a thermal blanket till 150 degrees or so, the entire 5 inches of butt.

:: seriously, with that much rust, don't forget the WD40 (rust can do exactly this) ::
:alien:
 
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kgoods

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
I don't see any signs of epoxy but it could have been put into the hole before the bolt. But that rust could for sure be the problem. I'd be careful with WD-40 or PB Blaster or any liquids as it will make the wood swell which could add to the problem.

If it were my cue I'd try an impact wrench with the air dialed down a bunch. This is a two man job, one on the impact wrench and one holding the cue. Govern the aggressiveness by how much pressure you hold the cue with your hands. Then you can increase the aggressiveness by either increasing the air pressure or not letting it slip in your grip as much. Sometimes the hammering motion will break it loose much better than constant pressure. Just be sure to start out slow and work up, you'll be able to see any problems developing early that way.

Be sure to keep good pressure in the hex bit, you don't want to round it out.

Only after trying this would I resort to some kind of anti rust liquid and then hit it again with the impact wrench. Where there's a will there's a way.

This is all assuming that there's no epoxy in there, if there is and you hit it hard enough you will still get it out but the threads will probably come with it! Then it would need to be drilled/bored and retapped larger if you wanted to add adjustable weight in the future.

Just thought I'd add.... I would only do this to my own cue (if I absolutely couldn't live with the weight) or a crap cue. I would never attempt this on any decent cue, but then again I'd probably never have to. ;)
 
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conetip

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If all attempts to remove the object fail, use left hand drills to drill out the part. To reduce the radial stress on the cue, drill out using a few different sizes.
 

L I F D 1

L S S T 10
Silver Member
I don't see any signs of epoxy but it could have been put into the hole before the bolt. But that rust could for sure be the problem. I'd be careful with WD-40 or PB Blaster or any liquids as it will make the wood swell which could add to the problem.

If it were my cue I'd try an impact wrench with the air dialed down a bunch. This is a two man job, one on the impact wrench and one holding the cue. Govern the aggressiveness by how much pressure you hold the cue with your hands. Then you can increase the aggressiveness by either increasing the air pressure or not letting it slip in your grip as much. Sometimes the hammering motion will break it loose much better than constant pressure. Just be sure to start out slow and work up, you'll be able to see any problems developing early that way.

Be sure to keep good pressure in the hex bit, you don't want to round it out.

Only after trying this would I resort to some kind of anti rust liquid and then hit it again with the impact wrench. Where there's a will there's a way.

This is all assuming that there's no epoxy in there, if there is and you hit it hard enough you will still get it out but the threads will probably come with it! Then it would need to be drilled/bored and retapped larger if you wanted to add adjustable weight in the future.

Just thought I'd add.... I would only do this to my own cue (if I absolutely couldn't live with the weight) or a crap cue. I would never attempt this on any decent cue, but then again I'd probably never have to. ;)
may i suggest...... go with the rust dissolver , get that bullshit bolt out of there
clean the hole , drill , tap , and configure a new bolt , try copper bolt replacement
:alien:
ie ::: after clearing the hole , drill the walls to insure removal of all liquid chemical
can't go wrong with a copper replacement (just a thought , Good Luck)
 

jayman

Hi Mom!
Silver Member
I will admit I didn't read many responses to the original question. Here is an OPINION, If you epoxy in a weight bolt you should die in a bad way then go directly to hell. Ya know, just an opinion. A certain FALCON MADE PREDATOR P.O.S, comes to mind!!
 

evergruven

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
thanks everybody for all the responses
glue not showing is a good point..hadn't really considered the rust either
I emailed a rep for the company that sold the cue
they said the bolt wasn't glued in, but was machine-tightened
I can only take their word for it
but am left with the thing

would anybody here with the tools and knowhow be willing to take a crack at it?
I would of course cover shipping costs and would be happy to pay for the work
if the bolt could come out, I would also be interested in a tip change
not sure if it matters, but this is meant to be a carom cue, and has a wood pin, fyi
thanks again
 
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