Carolina Custom Cues website down

Jobba786

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Any news?

I don't have to contact them. I was just wondering. I have a CC cue myself, and it is a really good and nice cue, one of the first they made.

-Jon BIrger
 

tduncan

Bet something...
Silver Member
I agree, great group of guys. They had another business going & decided to go 100% with that I believe. At least that is what I was told.
 

desertshark

Racks on racks on racks
Silver Member
Aw man. Another quality cue company down. Wish pool would make a come back to keep some of these guys going...
 

JB Cases

www.jbcases.com
Gold Member
Silver Member
Aw man. Another quality cue company down. Wish pool would make a come back to keep some of these guys going...

Pool is saturated with cue makers as it is. Last count was something over 700 active cue makers and more than 1000 brands.

There is no shortage of cues or great cue makers. It's not the lack of customers that is the issue although we agree that if there were more customers it would be better.

It's hard to buy a bad cue these days. There are plenty of cue makers to choose from and because of that competition it would be hard for any cue maker to make it on cues alone even if we added another couple million players in my opinion.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't want to get in to a buy American debate here, that horse has been beat to death many times.
Here's my future prediction.
There will be no more domestic production cue companies only custom makers.
All of the production cues will be imported.
It's just a matter of cost.
 

JB Cases

www.jbcases.com
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't want to get in to a buy American debate here, that horse has been beat to death many times.
Here's my future prediction.
There will be no more domestic production cue companies only custom makers.
All of the production cues will be imported.
It's just a matter of cost.

I think you will see in about five years that the cost of Asian made cues will rise significantly as the cost of labor and materials rises.

Already it's a lot more expensive to live in China than it was 7 years ago. The exchange rate has dropped 25% but the cost of labor has risen over 50%. The cost of materials has risen up to 150% in some sectors. The other day I spent $1.80 for 4 slices of bread at the bakery.

I think American cue companies can survive and thrive. Not all of them but I do see a future for American made production cues.
 

Spimp13

O8 Specialist
Silver Member
Pool is saturated with cue makers as it is. Last count was something over 700 active cue makers and more than 1000 brands.

There is no shortage of cues or great cue makers. It's not the lack of customers that is the issue although we agree that if there were more customers it would be better.

It's hard to buy a bad cue these days. There are plenty of cue makers to choose from and because of that competition it would be hard for any cue maker to make it on cues alone even if we added another couple million players in my opinion.

From a consumer viewpoint this is good as it drives competition to come out with a better product as well as potentially quicker lead times with more options, maybe even better pricing.

On the downside it hurts the cue maker having to compete more...this also can be a good thing pushing them to get better...but it can also be a bad thing if it drives them out of business. I never like to see anyone go out of business and I agree they did seem to make decent cues for decent prices.
 

ChicagoRJ

EEEEEXCELLENT ;)
Silver Member
From a consumer viewpoint this is good as it drives competition to come out with a better product as well as potentially quicker lead times with more options, maybe even better pricing.

On the downside it hurts the cue maker having to compete more...this also can be a good thing pushing them to get better...but it can also be a bad thing if it drives them out of business. I never like to see anyone go out of business and I agree they did seem to make decent cues for decent prices.

Yep. And it seems to me, this is only me, but folks are hanging onto their cues a lot longer. Man, 5 years or more ago, everyone was buying a new cue, custom and production, and then buying another one a year later,, soon they had 5 or 6 cues, and sell one every once in awhile to a buddy or something.... It was kind like shoe buying for woman, we didn't need 6 cues, but damn it, we were gonna have them anyways ;)

Now, I can't remember the last time a teammate even got a new cue ? My last cue was buying a used, beat up Willie Hoppe, and paying someone to restore it. and that was over 2 years ago. I have 3 cues right now and 3 break cues. I look in the wanted section for something that strikes my eye and the price is right, but the prices are not right, and nothing has struck my eye ;)
 

Type79

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
From a consumer viewpoint this is good as it drives competition to come out with a better product as well as potentially quicker lead times with more options, maybe even better pricing.

On the downside it hurts the cue maker having to compete more...this also can be a good thing pushing them to get better...but it can also be a bad thing if it drives them out of business. I never like to see anyone go out of business and I agree they did seem to make decent cues for decent prices.

With quality custom cuemakers selling new cues for as little as $700, I can't imagine prices dropping lower than that. Even at that price point, a cuemaker can't make cues full time.

Unfortunately, too many people look at the cost of the materials and think the profit is high, but don't factor-in the labor costs and costs to purchase and maintain machinery and equipment.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I think you will see in about five years that the cost of Asian made cues will rise significantly as the cost of labor and materials rises.

Already it's a lot more expensive to live in China than it was 7 years ago. The exchange rate has dropped 25% but the cost of labor has risen over 50%. The cost of materials has risen up to 150% in some sectors. The other day I spent $1.80 for 4 slices of bread at the bakery.

I think American cue companies can survive and thrive. Not all of them but I do see a future for American made production cues.

then production will move to India from china.
 

JB Cases

www.jbcases.com
Gold Member
Silver Member
then production will move to India from china.

Well it's already moving to Vietnam and even to Africa. The point is that eventually wages and costs will reach an equilibrium and then it will be only a matter of who has the best service and is most efficient.
 
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