Chalk Transfer Photos

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
are you implying that the more chalk transfered to the ball is good??
why??
if so how do you prove that???
 

logical

apart of their 'semi public'
Silver Member
Yes, please redo the study 7 different ways but first buy a decent scanning electron microscope so we have less subjective results. We'll be here on the couch waiting.
 

The Renfro

Outsville.com
Silver Member
More chalk on the ball is not a good thing as chalk can cause skids... This is the number 1 complaint on the Kamui .98... Since The Great White is a cosmetic grade like the Kamui I had people inquiring as to whether or not it had the same problems... The less transferred and the less sticky it is the more likely it comes off thanks to the cloth on the table... All chalk leaves some residue the balancing act is to not leave too much while still getting the chalk to layer up on the cue tip nicely......
 

The Renfro

Outsville.com
Silver Member
no comparison of white chalk and balabushka ?

Apparenty the Balabushka and Kamui 1.21 are MIA... I have had them both under the microscope in the last few weeks but they eluded me when I packed up to head to the pool room... Will look for them before I go out one evening this week and get some transfer shots of them.....

Chris
 

Nullus

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
are you implying that the more chalk transfered to the ball is good??
why??
if so how do you prove that???

Hmm, I don't think that was it, but if for some reason it was, I'd sure like to hear why. The last thing I want is more chalk all over everything except my tip when playing. Tables and balls get dirty enough as it is and more chalk everywhere can't be good for the game.
 

Fenwick

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've tried to explain to players not to practice with object balls because of chalk transfer.
They don't get the idea of cling. Thanks for the post. Seeing is believing.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
As far as the balls are concerned they had been cleaned by hand with the Aramith compound last weekend.... =)

I stopped using any type of cleaner on the balls years ago.

New balls create inconsistent reactions....as they break in.
When you polish the balls, you are recreating this problem.
 

logical

apart of their 'semi public'
Silver Member
I stopped using any type of cleaner on the balls years ago.

New balls create inconsistent reactions....as they break in.
When you polish the balls, you are recreating this problem.

I'd be interested in what makes you not only believe this but think you can just type it and not be asked to explain your conclusion.
 

Nullus

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'd be interested in what makes you not only believe this but think you can just type it and not be asked to explain your conclusion.

I have to agree here. The only way new balls would play poorly is if the manufacturers put something on them that needed 'worn off'. I find it hard to believe that they would knowingly do this. The only other explanation would be that you think they play better once they start picking up foreign matter, such as dirt, chalk and anything else from normal play, which you must think they need to do to be broken in. Cleaning them would be a good thing before a test if done properly with a cleaner that doesn't leave anything on them, such as some folks do when they use the wrong type of cleaner and/or polish the balls and leave chemicals on them.
 

The Renfro

Outsville.com
Silver Member
Accu-Stats cleans the TV balls each morning before play starts when we are onsite... By hand to eliminate premature wear caused by motorized ball cleaners... There was one instance where the referee cleaned them mid match at his own discretion and that caused an issue where the coefficient of friction changed and the balls threw differently... The players complained that they did not want them cleaned during play....

Dr Dave did a test awhile back on throw because of different cleaners....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_taEBDVQBYQ

For the chalk testing I went with the idea that a clean surface would likely pick up fewer particles than dirty balls and there was about 4 hours play between the cleaning and the photos at the end of the week...

Chris
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'd be interested in what makes you not only believe this but think you can just type it and not be asked to explain your conclusion.

I was hoping someone would inquire....
...and the fact that you're logical is comforting. :wink:

New or polished balls are slippery....as they get hit, some spots appear
that have more friction...those spots don't slip.....
...so just when you've got adjusted to slippery balls angles....then you
have one miss thick.

New or polished balls also produce more mis-cues if you use extreme english.....they slip off the tip more also...you gotta hit closer to center.

This is not new knowledge....it's just been forgotten....
...a hundred years ago, English billiard players would not use a set of
balls in a tournament unless they had been broken in for three weeks.
 

Nullus

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
There is still no science behind your reasoning. The varying degrees of foreign matter on the balls would be harder to adjust to than knowing you had completely clean pool balls every time you play which would, in effect, be easier to adjust and get used to. Fairly simple logic. Sounds more like excuses from those players in days past.
 

The Renfro

Outsville.com
Silver Member
There is still no science behind your reasoning. The varying degrees of foreign matter on the balls would be harder to adjust to than knowing you had completely clean pool balls every time you play which would, in effect, be easier to adjust and get used to. Fairly simple logic. Sounds more like excuses from those players in days past.

I don't know... I think it depends on what you clean them with... I would think he might be more right than wrong if someone was armor alling them or using another product with Silicone or maybe even some forms of wax... at contact there is heat if the balls are slipping and that hot spot may be enough to create the spot that acts different if you strike it there again....

I have no clue if the heat generated is enough from the ball collision but I am 100% familiar with burn marks left on the cueball from miss-cues so it's a possibility... Dr. Dave may have some information on the phenomena but I have not seen it on his site but it is a large site......
 

x3dnd3x

Trainee Chalk Collector
Silver Member
I've always wondered how does the chalk makers actually make the hole into the chalk when they're in the process of making it? :confused:
 

The Renfro

Outsville.com
Silver Member
You can actually mold the indention in during pressing but in our case the top is faced on a sander and masonry ball makes the indention at the same time.. I tried the casting method and the chalk seemed to need to be broken in before it really applied well to the tip... With the facing and grinding it sticks well without a break in... I always hated new masters because it is pretty hard and since I paint the tip with the chalk a new cube was a PITA....

Chris
 

Nullus

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't know... I think it depends on what you clean them with... I would think he might be more right than wrong if someone was armor alling them or using another product with Silicone or maybe even some forms of wax... at contact there is heat if the balls are slipping and that hot spot may be enough to create the spot that acts different if you strike it there again....

I have no clue if the heat generated is enough from the ball collision but I am 100% familiar with burn marks left on the cueball from miss-cues so it's a possibility... Dr. Dave may have some information on the phenomena but I have not seen it on his site but it is a large site......

I believe I stated earlier, as long as they're cleaned properly. :p
 

The Renfro

Outsville.com
Silver Member
I believe I stated earlier, as long as they're cleaned properly. :p

Haha that you did... I used to take a piece of simonis and soak it in silicone that I kept in the trunk of my car... I would then make sure to clean the cueball by putting it in my pocket where the piece of simonis was... I did this to a friend of mine on a bunch of occasions... We were practicing and not gambling so it was a joke more than a move but man ohhh man it was awesome to watch him try and draw the ball a foot and watch it come back 3 or 4 feet..... His face was always priceless and the comment was always "man I hit it too good... AGAIN!!!"
 

x3dnd3x

Trainee Chalk Collector
Silver Member
You can actually mold the indention in during pressing but in our case the top is faced on a sander and masonry ball makes the indention at the same time.. I tried the casting method and the chalk seemed to need to be broken in before it really applied well to the tip... With the facing and grinding it sticks well without a break in... I always hated new masters because it is pretty hard and since I paint the tip with the chalk a new cube was a PITA....

Chris

Let's say I do not have what you mentioned above, what's the easier method to make the hole bigger?

Damn this sounds kinky. :embarrassed2:
 
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