Filler at 13

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have done a fair amount of youth sports coaching back when my sons were youngsters- I saw a lot and I would say one of the worst things one can do as a coach or instructor with youngsters who show great talent is to try and adjust their rhythm and even at times their mechanics to meet some " more accepted" method of play. Youngsters who are exceptionally talented, in my opinion, should be let to run at their own pace until/ if at some time in their career they hit a wall and the solution is obvious to very few in the know.

There are some videos of Mosconi almost literally running around the table pocketing balls and getting perfect break shots- not quite as fast as Lou Butera, but a fast pace indeed- I would imagine he played that way since he was a pre-teen . Good thing no one changed his style and rhythm.

I think that some "coaches" who are not as naturally talented as their students ; just cannot understand how an advanced mind can process a game like billiards at such high speeds. Too often in life people want to change things just because they really can't understand how it works - that is not always for the better.

Indulging enthusiasm is one thing but if your goal is to produce players, you need subjects that can navigate obstacle courses. Learning these skills is especially not high speed work. Leave the drag racing to drag racing.
 

overlord

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Players that slow down the pace of Nine Ball, butcher the game in my opinion.

Nine Ball was meant to be a fast and loose game.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Players that slow down the pace of Nine Ball, butcher the game in my opinion.

Nine Ball was meant to be a fast and loose game.

I was talking about the learning/preparation process. Playing is different. It's the show and that should go as smoothly as possible.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Indulging enthusiasm is one thing but if your goal is to produce players, you need subjects that can navigate obstacle courses. Learning these skills is especially not high speed work. Leave the drag racing to drag racing.

I was Not talking about teaching fundamentals- I was talking about letting HIGHLY gifted/talented players play at their own pace/rhythm- Not some pace that fits a coaches mold. Do you disagree with that concept? I can't tell from your response why you were quoting me- your response has nothing to do with my statements.

Perhaps you need to slow down yourself and actually read and understand a statemnt before quoting it.
 
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straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was Not talking about teaching fundamentals- I was talking about letting HIGHLY gifted/talented players play at their own pace/rhythm- Not some pace that fits a coaches mold. Do you disagree with that concept? I can't tell from your response why you were quoting me- your response has nothing to do with my statements.

Perhaps you need to slow down yourself and actually read and understand a statemnt before quoting it.

Tsk tsk. High strung is a weakness as well. I WAS speaking of pace as related to anyone's development. And you left the area open; unless of course your yoots is awl accomplished playuhs.

General non scientific example:

Rempe, Davenport, Mcready, Morris, I'm sure there is a ton of guys from that style, all sidelined. On the other side of the coin, Reyes and any of the current crop of "slow, "game butchers" still playing and taking it down with competence.

I like Filler, Shaw, etc. but they're already prepped to run and they'll slow down after they get a few cracks anyway. Then there's the followers who can zip through a pack or two; lotta appeal to developing that approach, but what's that? a few minutes of dead outs? Can you distinguish between the Fillers and the "fillers" ?
 
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