Filler at 13

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
Yes, Josh was an early bloomer for sure. By the age of seventeen, if memory serves here, he had a high run in straight pool of 293.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If anything, he has slightly slowed down from the tempo he played at back then! Seeing the way this young man played at age 13 is certainly proof positive that natural talent plays a huge role as to why some of the top professional players are as good as they are.
 

bb9ball

Registered
Yes, Josh was an early bloomer for sure. By the age of seventeen, if memory serves here, he had a high run in straight pool of 293.

FYI,

In this video, the commentators mention his high run in straight pool was 140(at 13). I think this was from something Josh filled out to give them some info about him.
 

overlord

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
The talent is evident to see. I've never understood some people's negative comments regarding Filler.
 

alstl

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've seen him reach for the jump cue and I thought he couldn't kick until I saw him play Chohan in one pocket.

Filler has a complete game. He and Gorst are probably the best young players in the game.

Gorst has one thing in common with Irving Crane. They both learned the game on a 5X10.
 

S.Vaskovskyi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
That video refreshed some good memories about that EC in Luxemburg. I had really enjoyed the time there as a coach together with a junior. Quite a lot of talents, interesting matches. If I remember correctly that EC for youth was the last for such generation of players as Mario He, Max Lechner, Woizech Shevchik, Marc Bijsterbosch and others who had outgrown the junior division.
 

Matt_24

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This goes back to Tin Man's TALENT discussion.

There are levels to this. We could see then what kind of player he was going to be. I believe Justin Bergman, Skylar Woodward, probably SVB were the same at a young age.
 

jason

Unprofessional everything
Silver Member
So what happened to Maslov, who won this match over Filler?

Good question Jay. I looked him up on Fargo and he was a 525 (if that was him). So much talent. Did he quit playing? I'm curious. It honestly looked like he had a little more composure than Filler at that young age. Both played very, very well.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Good question Jay. I looked him up on Fargo and he was a 525 (if that was him). So much talent. Did he quit playing? I'm curious. It honestly looked like he had a little more composure than Filler at that young age. Both played very, very well.

I did the same while watching the video a few days ago. Zero games in the system. He must have quit shortly after this match?
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
This goes back to Tin Man's TALENT discussion.

There are levels to this. We could see then what kind of player he was going to be. I believe Justin Bergman, Skylar Woodward, probably SVB were the same at a young age.

I saw Skylar at about age 13 at DCC, he was a B player about then. A whole different planet. Filler was already pro level at this video.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'd like to comment on the commentators saying for Filler to slow down, and it was hurting his game in general.

I disagree. Someone like Filler is simply smarter at pool then the rest of us. He sees the whole table instantly, and knows instantly what he's going to do. Earl and Ronnie O'Sullivan are the exact same way.

Why would anyone want to slow down any of those 3? It will just aggravate them. I think if you have a kid that plays super fast, let him/her keep that pace. They are hungry to get to the table and make the balls. They are thinking different than the rest of us.

IMO:)
 
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Quesports

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not a big fan of Filler even though he is a phenomenal player. I do like his choice of energy bars in the first link.. Old school right there...lol
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
I'd like to comment on the commentators saying for Filler to slow down, and it was hurting his game in general.

I disagree. Someone like Filler is simply smarter at pool then the rest of us. He sees the whole table instantly, and knows instantly what he's going to do. Earl and Ronnie O'Sullivan are the exact same way.

Why would anyone want to slow down any of those 3? It will just aggravate them. I think if you have a kid that plays super fast, let him/her keep that pace. They are hungry to get to the table and make the balls. They are thinking different than the rest of us.

IMO:)

Agreed 100%. There's a correct pace for everybody. Unless fast playing is accompanied by poor decision making, it's no problem at all.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have done a fair amount of youth sports coaching back when my sons were youngsters- I saw a lot and I would say one of the worst things one can do as a coach or instructor with youngsters who show great talent is to try and adjust their rhythm and even at times their mechanics to meet some " more accepted" method of play. Youngsters who are exceptionally talented, in my opinion, should be let to run at their own pace until/ if at some time in their career they hit a wall and the solution is obvious to very few in the know.

There are some videos of Mosconi almost literally running around the table pocketing balls and getting perfect break shots- not quite as fast as Lou Butera, but a fast pace indeed- I would imagine he played that way since he was a pre-teen . Good thing no one changed his style and rhythm.

I think that some "coaches" who are not as naturally talented as their students ; just cannot understand how an advanced mind can process a game like billiards at such high speeds. Too often in life people want to change things just because they really can't understand how it works - that is not always for the better.
 
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