Gandy Repair

RUMMY

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Picked this thing up for free. The owner was moving the rails as a single unit and his help was carrying it by the skirts, yielding this result. I resold the table the next day and used some carriage bolts to refasten the brackets on the skirts. I think I hit my goal of attempting a factory-like look.





 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Did you consider glue and wood screws from the inside? Or a threaded insert or t-nut? Even some long set epoxy and a couple of clamps would have worked.
 
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RUMMY

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Did you consider glue and wood screws from the inside? Or a threaded insert or t-nut? Even some long set epoxy and a couple of clamps would have worked.

All good ideas, but I didn’t want to go with just an adhesive due to the particle board like material that Gandy uses. Insert would be good for concealment but again, I feel the particles board would separate over time
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
All good ideas, but I didn’t want to go with just an adhesive due to the particle board like material that Gandy uses. Insert would be good for concealment but again, I feel the particles board would separate over time

I think long cure epoxy would have held forever. That is, until the next time someone decides to remove the rail using the skirt.
 

trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
All good ideas, but I didn’t want to go with just an adhesive due to the particle board like material that Gandy uses. Insert would be good for concealment but again, I feel the particles board would separate over time

I think you made an excellent repair! Definitely permanent and will not pull apart again :) Keep up the good work!

Trent from Toledo :thumbup:
 

mchnhed

I Came, I Shot, I Choked
Silver Member
I think you made an excellent repair! Definitely permanent and will not pull apart again :) Keep up the good work!

Trent from Toledo :thumbup:

Good repair but.....not good looking.

Gorilla glue and some clamp time would have been the best.
 

trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
Good repair but.....not good looking.

Gorilla glue and some clamp time would have been the best.

Not true, it is mdf and would have came loose again. This was the most permanent fix and still looks good. You centered the bolts and they will not come out 😂
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not true, it is mdf and would have came loose again. This was the most permanent fix and still looks good. You centered the bolts and they will not come out 😂

I don't know, Trent. It looked glued from the factory and the only reason it came loose/broke was because someone didn't take the table apart properly. I think the glue would have held for years to come.
 

trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't know, Trent. It looked glued from the factory and the only reason it came loose/broke was because someone didn't take the table apart properly. I think the glue would have held for years to come.

It was most likely glued and stapled, which ='s it will come loose. Not seeing how what he did is bad. It is a low budget table and he fixed the issue permanently. As for the "look" of it, I guess that is up to the person who bought the table. I personally would be totally fine with it. Not sure why either negative "nancy" posts were necessary. Just saying something to argue I guess....


Trent
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It was most likely glued and stapled, which ='s it will come loose. Not seeing how what he did is bad. It is a low budget table and he fixed the issue permanently. As for the "look" of it, I guess that is up to the person who bought the table. I personally would be totally fine with it. Not sure why either negative "nancy" posts were necessary. Just saying something to argue I guess....


Trent

Not being negative, just pointing out other potential fixes. The repair is suitable and permanent. Mission: accomplished.
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I must be bored.
Actually, trying to avoid going back to work in the shop on a saturday after late lunch :D

Gotta agree with Trent and the OP.
The thing about perfect glue and procedures with particle board is....it's still particle board and the layer that is glued will pop off. No glue failure; board failure. Also fwiw, would the naysayers have a problem if the bolts were SS, mirror polished? :)

smt
 

Lawnboy77

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I must be bored.
Actually, trying to avoid going back to work in the shop on a saturday after late lunch :D

Gotta agree with Trent and the OP.
The thing about perfect glue and procedures with particle board is....it's still particle board and the layer that is glued will pop off. No glue failure; board failure. Also fwiw, would the naysayers have a problem if the bolts were SS, mirror polished? :)

smt

I was thinking the same, I wouldn't sweat that repair when dealing with particle board, just go the quickest, most functional route and call it done.

If folks don't like the shiny bolt heads they can always be touched up with paint that matches the formica.
 

trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
The thing about perfect glue and procedures with particle board is....it's still particle board and the layer that is glued will pop off. No glue failure; board failure. :) smt

Ding ding ding! We have a winner! :) It is a cheap table and def a permanent fix. Would I do this on an Anniversary or Gold Crown 3 or higher? Not a chance.

Trent from Toledo

Not funny at all, about as funny as watching paint dry.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
Ding ding ding! We have a winner! :) It is a cheap table and def a permanent fix. Would I do this on an Anniversary or Gold Crown 3 or higher? Not a chance.

Trent from Toledo

Not funny at all, about as funny as watching paint dry.
Again, a fix for one kind of table does not mean it's the same fix for another, unless Brunswick made particleboard skirts for the Anniversary, Centennials, and GC's, you can't relate the same fix to any of those tables. I guarantee you it took some effort to break off those mounting blocks. So, bottom line is what would YOU have done to fix those skirt blocks?
 

trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
Again, a fix for one kind of table does not mean it's the same fix for another, unless Brunswick made particleboard skirts for the Anniversary, Centennials, and GC's, you can't relate the same fix to any of those tables. I guarantee you it took some effort to break off those mounting blocks. So, bottom line is what would YOU have done to fix those skirt blocks?

GOOD MORNING COBRA!!!

Not going to entertain your offer of an argument over this one, I already stated I was very confident in the fix the OP offered.

If you read carefully I was clearly against trying to use that fix for GC Anny or Centennial because of the fact that those models have real wood aprons. Rather than "stirring" the pot, why not put your opinion into the conversation? I hope all is well out west, I am sure it is already cold as ice out there!

Trent from Toledo
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
If you read carefully I was clearly against trying to use that fix for GC Anny or Centennial because of the fact that those models have real wood aprons

If you read clearly, there was no discussion on how to fix solid wood rail skirts, so your comment has no bearing on the subject, does it? Apples to oranges have nothing in common!
 

trentfromtoledo

8onthebreaktoledo
Gold Member
Silver Member
If you read clearly, there was no discussion on how to fix solid wood rail skirts, so your comment has no bearing on the subject, does it? Apples to oranges have nothing in common!

I have seen no comment from you that has any bearing on the subject!! I was clearly stating what I would not do!

You ornery old snake!

Trent from Toledo
 
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