Getting Serious About Some Systems

HomeBrewer

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I've decided to focus on learning some three cushion systems in a more dedicated way than I have previously, between the recent threads on systems here and the fact that a health issue will soon keep me confined to my home for several months in 2020 (with a 10' Gabriels in my billiard room -- don't throw me in that briar patch!)

I'd like thoughts from those of you that do regularly and reliably use systems on which are considered to be 'must haves'. For instance, the two I've always had pretty good luck with are spot-on-the-wall for three rails first to a bank shot, as well as the Dani Sanchez one for short, long, ball, long, ball (I'll have to dig up a visual for that).

I own the Sid Banner book as well as the Walt Harris volumes 3 and 4 (1 and 2 are in the mail to me now), but have found them to feel more like reference than instruction. That is not a slight against any book, but I'm missing what a lot of you guys who play socially or have instructors have, namely someone to say 'you REALLY need to know X, Y, and Z'

Obviously I've looked through the books and found the systems for shots the seem to come up a lot for me, but I'd still like to hear which ones you guys find indispensable.

Thanks!
 

Bob Jewett

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I think Byrne covers all the ones I think of as indispensable, and he has pretty good explanations. Corner-5, plus-2, opposite 3, equal angle, maximum side spin
 

HomeBrewer

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Thanks Bob. I should have mentioned the Byrne books as part my my library.

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kilby

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I rather hate to share these, but my preferred systems are obtained from a dozen You Tube videos from a site named Billiard Kingdom. The fellow who describes and demonstrates these Korean systems has completely changed my approach to systems play. Some of his videos which are not tutorials show a level of skill I have never seen before.
 

Bob Jewett

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I rather hate to share these, but my preferred systems are obtained from a dozen You Tube videos from a site named Billiard Kingdom. The fellow who describes and demonstrates these Korean systems has completely changed my approach to systems play. Some of his videos which are not tutorials show a level of skill I have never seen before.

This video illustrates how he calculates a plus-2-style shot. There are no numbers involved except for the fixed offset (1.4 diamonds?) he uses from the third-rail landing point. The rest is making two distances equal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNl4fV0NmDk

It would be interesting to compare the lines given by this system and the standard plus-2 system.

It would be nice if there were English subtitles but his examples are clear enough to let you puzzle out his method.
 

bbb

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i have a hard time understanding his system
anyone else?
 

Texas Carom Club

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Bob Jewett

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i have a hard time understanding his system
anyone else?
He finds where to hit on the third rail. He places chalk about 1.5 diamonds up from that. He finds the line through the cue ball that is the same distance from the far corner as it is from the chalk. (There is always such a line if the shot is possible.) He shoots the cue ball along that line with moderate running follow.

That's pretty clear from the video, I think.

On your table and with your "normal" stroke, the 1.5-diamond number may be different for you. I suppose it can also change if you use extreme or no side spin.
 

HomeBrewer

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This video illustrates how he calculates a plus-2-style shot. There are no numbers involved except for the fixed offset (1.4 diamonds?) he uses from the third-rail landing point. The rest is making two distances equal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNl4fV0NmDk

It would be interesting to compare the lines given by this system and the standard plus-2 system.

It would be nice if there were English subtitles but his examples are clear enough to let you puzzle out his method.

Ok, so beginning at 0:56 in the video:

1) He identifies the third rail arrival point (diamond #4)
2) He subtracts 1.4 (possibly)
3) The remaining distance between the offset on the long rail and the cue butt intersection of that rail are measured
4) That distance 'down' from the top-left corner becomes the first rail aim point

Neat! I'm off to practice.
 

HomeBrewer

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Two obervations:

1) I ain't making them all, but definitely a dang few more than without an aiming system

2) I have had remarkably few kisses. Like, maybe none.

2a) To be fair, that statement applies where the shot actually existed and I wasn't overextending the limits of the pattern/system

This guy has some good stuff. I'm starting to wish I'd studied Korean all those years rather than Spanish and Mandarin. All they got me was fat and married.
 

bbb

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He finds where to hit on the third rail. He places chalk about 1.5 diamonds up from that. He finds the line through the cue ball that is the same distance from the far corner as it is from the chalk. (There is always such a line if the shot is possible.) He shoots the cue ball along that line with moderate running follow.

That's pretty clear from the video, I think.

On your table and with your "normal" stroke, the 1.5-diamond number may be different for you. I suppose it can also change if you use extreme or no side spin.

thanks bob
 

Bob Jewett

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...
3) The remaining distance between the offset on the long rail and the cue butt intersection of that rail are measured
4) That distance 'down' from the top-left corner becomes the first rail aim point
...
Not exactly. You do not know the cue butt intersection until you know the aiming line. It is like a lot of systems when the cue ball is out in the middle of the table. You have to iterate (which means try guesses repeatedly in a smart fashion) until you find a shot line that passes through the cue ball and makes the two distances equal. There is only one such line.

One way to do (really, avoid) the iterations is to use a correct spot on the wall system. Among other things, "correct" means the spot will almost certainly not be on your wall. The spot on the wall works for many situations that would otherwise require iteration.
 

HomeBrewer

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Thanks Bob. After continuing attempts I finally stumbled onto that.

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Bob Jewett

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... One way to do (really, avoid) the iterations is to use a correct spot on the wall system. Among other things, "correct" means the spot will almost certainly not be on your wall....
It turns out that I had never tried the spot on the wall method for the plus-2 system. I tried to do it the other day to demo to a student how spot on the wall works after we had used it for the corner-5. I got a surprise.

The spot on the wall is infinitely far away for the plus-2. If you think about the geometry it becomes obvious. That means that if the cue ball is between reference tracks, you need to do a parallel shift rather than a pivot around the spot on the wall. Most people seem to pivot when they try to do a parallel shift.
 
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